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Home - Science of Learning Research Centre. How to praise your child: why simply saying 'well done' is not helpful. How do you react when you hear expressions like “well done”, “another A grade”, “aren’t you clever” and “great work”?

How to praise your child: why simply saying 'well done' is not helpful

Maybe you use them yourself with your children in the belief that it will encourage them to work hard and do well. It turns out that praise like this is not helpful and can actually damage children. Stanford University researcher Carol Dweck has shown that generalised praise of this kind can all too easily create learners who have what she calls a “fixed mindset”. These children are afraid to make mistakes, unlikely to put in the necessary effort and, most importantly, unwilling to really practise because they have a fixed view of how smart they are. When you label a child as “clever” you are not helping them. Instead we need to be specific with our praise and focus on how the outcome was achieved: I really noticed how much effort you put into selecting interesting vocabulary in your opening paragraph. How to give effective feedback Why does that matter?

8 Flipped Classroom Benefits For Students And Teachers - eLearning Industry. 7 Neuroscience Fundamentals For Instructional Designers - eLearning Industry. The brain is a beautiful thing.

7 Neuroscience Fundamentals For Instructional Designers - eLearning Industry

It's also one of the most complex and complicated structures known to man. Every emotion, thought, and memory involves countless chemical reactions and neural pathways. To learn new information, our minds must be primed for the task. Which is why eLearning professionals should consider these 7 neuroscience fundamentals for their Instructional Design. 1. Our brains are often likened to machines. 2.

Learning isn't as simple and straightforward as some might think. 3. The human memory is finite. 4. It probably comes as no surprise that humans love rewards. 5. Everyone needs a bit of personalized praise from time to time. Search for "Spaced eLearning" - eLearning Industry. Carol Tomlinson. Differentiating Your Classroom with Ease - The Brown Bag Teacher. For me, differentiating no longer means creating separate games/activities/learning targets.

Differentiating Your Classroom with Ease - The Brown Bag Teacher

It doesn't mean that some students do more work or students are being taught different content. It does mean tweaking activities, so they have the just-right scaffolds and pushes for my students. To me - right now - differentiation means... Believing these things, our team has developed structures and organization to help us be intentional in our planning.

Today I'm sharing some ideas, resources, and specific examples that have worked in my classroom. What do I need? Like most teacher stories, it all starts with school supplies. How do you group and organize for your groups? We flexibly group our friends into these 3 groups - green (below grade-level), yellow (on grade-level), and blue (above grade-level) for math and reading. Color-coding groups really helps with planning and organizing my small-group materials. What does DI actually look like in your Reading Block? Research – Flipped Learning Simplified. Welcome. Connecting educators to what works. Students are not hard-wired to learn in different ways – we need to stop using unproven, harmful methods. In our series, Better Teachers, we’ll explore how to improve teacher education in Australia.

Students are not hard-wired to learn in different ways – we need to stop using unproven, harmful methods

We’ll look at what the evidence says on a range of themes including how to raise the status of the profession and measure and improve teacher quality. In health there are well-established protocols that govern the introduction of any new drug or treatment. Of major consideration is the notion of doing no harm. In education there are no such controls and plenty of vested interests keen to see the adoption of new strategies and resources for a variety of ideological and financial reasons. Teachers need to be critical consumers of research – as with medicine, lives are also at stake – yet with the best will in the world and without the knowledge and time to do so, decisions may be made to adopt new approaches that are not only ineffectual, but can actually do harm. Lack of evidence Psychologists and neuroscientists agree there is little efficacy for these models, which are based on dubious evidence.

Think. Learn. Innovate. Kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram. David Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory (ELT) Having developed the model over many years prior, David Kolb published his learning styles model in 1984.

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram

The model gave rise to related terms such as Kolb's experiential learning theory (ELT), and Kolb's learning styles inventory (LSI). In his publications - notably his 1984 book 'Experiential Learning: Experience As The Source Of Learning And Development' Kolb acknowledges the early work on experiential learning by others in the 1900's, including Rogers, Jung, and Piaget.

In turn, Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory are today acknowledged by academics, teachers, managers and trainers as truly seminal works; fundamental concepts towards our understanding and explaining human learning behaviour, and towards helping others to learn.