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A beautiful mind trapped in a crazy world .

Are You Living in a Computer Simulation? Many works of science fiction as well as some forecasts by serious technologists and futurologists predict that enormous amounts of computing power will be available in the future. Let us suppose for a moment that these predictions are correct. One thing that later generations might do with their super-powerful computers is run detailed simulations of their forebears or of people like their forebears.

Because their computers would be so powerful, they could run a great many such simulations. Suppose that these simulated people are conscious (as they would be if the simulations were sufficiently fine-grained and if a certain quite widely accepted position in the philosophy of mind is correct). Then it could be the case that the vast majority of minds like ours do not belong to the original race but rather to people simulated by the advanced descendants of an original race. The structure of the paper is as follows. Memory seems to be a no more stringent constraint than processing power.

Binary. List of computer simulation software. The following is a list of notable computer simulation software. Open Source[edit] Proprietary[edit] Biohacking. Biohacking is the practice of engaging biology with the hacker ethic.[1] Biohacking encompasses a wide spectrum of practices and movements ranging from Grinders who design and install DIY body-enhancements such as magnetic implants to DIY biologists who conduct at-home gene sequencing.[2][3][4][5] Biohacking emerged in a growing trend of non-institutional science and technology development.[1][6][7] Many biohacking activists, or biohackers, identify with the biopunk movement as well as transhumanism and techno-progressivism.[2][8][9] "Biohacking" can also refer to managing one's own biology using a combination of medical, nutritional and electronic techniques.

This may include the use of nootropics and/or cybernetic devices for recording biometric data.[5][10] Ideology[edit] Contemporary biohacking movements[edit] One of the larger biohacking movements is the DIY biology movement. Notable persons[edit] Meredith L. Groups and organizations[edit] Current projects[edit] See also[edit] Artificial Stupidity. Artificial Stupidity by Ali Minai "My colleagues, they study artificial intelligence; me, I study natural stupidity. " —Amos Tversky, (quoted in “The Undoing Project” by Michael Lewis). Not only is this quote by Tversky amusing, it also offers profound insight into the nature of intelligence – real and artificial. Most of us working on artificial intelligence (AI) take it for granted that the goal is to build machines that can reason better, integrate more data, and make more rational decisions. What the work of Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky shows is that this is not how people (and other animals) function.

If the goal in artificial intelligence is to replicate human capabilities, it may be impossible to build intelligent machines without "natural stupidity". The work of Tversky and Kahneman focused on showing systematically that much of intelligence is not rational. One of the biggest gaps between AI and natural intelligence is speed. Two things may provide some insight here. Divergent thinking. Divergent thinking is a thought process or method used to generate creative ideas by exploring many possible solutions. It is often used in conjunction with its cognitive opposite, convergent thinking, which follows a particular set of logical steps to arrive at one solution, which in some cases is a ‘correct’ solution. By contrast, divergent thinking typically occurs in a spontaneous, free-flowing manner, such that many ideas are generated in an emergent cognitive fashion.

Many possible solutions are explored in a short amount of time, and unexpected connections are drawn. After the process of divergent thinking has been completed, ideas and information are organized and structured using convergent thinking. Traits associated with divergent thinking[edit] Psychologists have found that a high IQ (like Albert Einstein) alone does not guarantee creativity. Promoting divergent thinking[edit] Playfulness and divergent thinking[edit] Effects of sleep deprivation on divergent thinking[edit] 1.

The Elements of Change. ‘Without accepting the fact that everything changes, we cannot find perfect composure. But unfortunately, although it is true, it is difficult for us to accept it. Because we cannot accept the truth of transience, we suffer.’ ~Shunryu Suzuki Post written by Leo Babauta. Change can be a difficult thing. Most people want to change their lives, in some way, but find it difficult to either get started or to sustain the change for very long. I’m happy to report that after years of studying it, I’ve become fairly good at it (though happily failing all the time). What have I learned from my changes? It can be incredibly difficult, or it can be wonderfully joyous. My Recent Changes I’ve made dozens of changes over the last few years (read My Story for a partial list), but here’s a short list of a few I’ve made just this year: Lost over 40 lbs since last year.

Again, this is a short list — there are others that are less noteworthy, and probably a few I’m forgetting. The Elements of Change 1. 2. 3. 4. Nondualism. Nondualism, also called non-duality, "points to the idea that the universe and all its multiplicity are ultimately expressions or appearances of one essential reality. " It is a term and concept used to define various strands of religious and spiritual thought. It is found in a variety of Asian religious traditions and modern western spirituality, but with a variety of meanings and uses. The term may refer to: Its origins are situated within the Buddhist tradition with its teaching of sunyata, the absence of inherently existing natures; the two truths doctrine, the nonduality of the absolute and the relative; and the Yogacara notion of "pure consciousness" or "representation-only" (vijñapti-mātra).

The term has more commonly become associated with the Advaita Vedanta tradition of Adi Shankara, which took over the Buddhist notions of anutpada and pure consciousness and provided an orthodox hermeneutical basis for heterodox Buddhist phenomology. Definitions[edit] Indian Buddhism[edit] D. 1. The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies. Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning.

However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. In this column and the next, using the story of Goldilocks and The Three Bears, we can learn from Irv about how to improve our question asking so that students learn more from text and from the world around them. Questioning, Thinking skills. 20 History Questions They Refuse To Answer In School. Traditional educational systems basically teach us that the history of man only dates back to about 8,000 years ago while religious texts date mankind to approximately 6,000 years ago. It is more than obvious that there a massive push to occlude our true history and origins. While you may not agree with some of the questions, please try to view them with an open mind. As you’ll see, the history we have been taught has been manipulated and obscured from us.

Ask yourself (or others) the following questions and feel free to comment at the end of the article! A map drawn on a gazelle skin of an unfrozen Antarctica was found in 1929. 1. The last time Antarctica was not frozen was at least 4,000 BC, so… 2. A tiny figurine made of baked-clay (right) was brought up in amongst the debris churned out by a huge drill bit during the drilling of a well in Nampa Idaho in 1889. 3. 4. According to Darwinism, man evolved from ape. 5. 6. In Ecuador, one large Jade cup and 12 smaller Jade cups were found. 7. Why Atheists Don't Really Exist. Confirmation bias is the tendency to ascribe greater significance to information which supports our pre-existing theories and lesser significance to information which contradicts those theories.

We often do this subconsciously. For example you get a new car, and suddenly you notice that type of car on the road with a much greater frequency than you had noticed before. But though confirmation bias generally refers to the inclusion or exclusion of data, there are other ways we can shoehorn the obvious to make it fit within our world view. Last month in The Atlantic, Matthew Hutson wrote a fascinating article titled: “The Science of Superstition: No One Is Immune to Magical Thinking.” Actually as an article it’s really not that fascinating, but as an illustration of the mental contortions one must make to defend atheism, it is Olympic. Skeptics call this patternicity, or projecting pattern where there is none.

Fr. When C.S. The life and works of Alan Watts. Zen. Zen is a school of Mahayana Buddhism[note 1] that developed in China during the Tang dynasty as Chán. From China, Zen spread south to Vietnam, northeast to Korea and east to Japan. Zen emphasizes rigorous meditation-practice, insight into Buddha-nature, and the personal expression of this insight in daily life, especially for the benefit of others. As such, it deemphasizes mere knowledge of sutras and doctrine and favors direct understanding through zazen and interaction with an accomplished teacher. The teachings of Zen include various sources of Mahāyāna thought, especially Yogācāra, the Tathāgatagarbha Sutras and Huayan, with their emphasis on Buddha-nature, totality, and the Bodhisattva-ideal. The Prajñāpāramitā literature and, to a lesser extent, Madhyamaka have also been influential in the shaping of the "paradoxical language" of the Zen-tradition.

Etymology[edit] Zen practice[edit] Dhyana - Zen meditation[edit] Central to Zen is the practice of dhyana or meditation. Lay services[edit] It's All InYour Mind. HyperPhysics. The observer effect. Neurological System | Jigsaw Health. Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers. Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers by Terry Heick Clocks and old watches are miracles. If you’ve ever taken one apart and had a look at the intricate gears with their jutting teeth reaching out with just the right math to tick in rhythm with the pulse of the universe, you’ll see that whatever mind conjured the thing and all its parts is mad.

Imagine the dogged pursuit of a proper clock-maker, day after day bound up in design and measurement and function and orderly thinking, forcing exactitude on little bits of metal that never asked for it. And then finally getting it right–so many decisions and matters of design suddenly set the clock off ticking forever. Get inside the mind of a clock-maker—one who still experiments with matters of design, improving their craft with minor revisions of planning and execution—and suddenly you’re seeing from ground zero how things come to be, first in a humble glow, then a blinding white starlight that bleaches everything.

There’s a lesson here. Google Videos. Psychological manipulation. Psychological manipulation is a type of social influence that aims to change the perception or behavior of others through underhanded, deceptive, or even abusive tactics.[1] By advancing the interests of the manipulator, often at another's expense, such methods could be considered exploitative, abusive, devious, and deceptive. Social influence is not necessarily negative. For example, doctors can try to persuade patients to change unhealthy habits. Social influence is generally perceived to be harmless when it respects the right of the influenced to accept or reject and is not unduly coercive.

Depending on the context and motivations, social influence may constitute underhanded manipulation. Requirements for successful manipulation[edit] According to psychology author George K. Simon, successful psychological manipulation primarily involves the manipulator:[2] How manipulators control their victims[edit] According to Braiker[edit] According to Simon[edit] Other Techniques[edit] See also[edit] Perfect Persuasive Messages. Craft messages that change minds using these 20 principles of persuasion, all based on established psychological research. Perfection is hard to achieve in any walk of life and persuasion is no different. It relies on many things going just right at the crucial moment; the perfect synchronisation of source, message and audience. But even if perfection is unlikely, we all need to know what to aim for.

To bring you the current series on the psychology of persuasion I’ve been reading lots of research, much more than is covered in recent posts. As I read, I noticed the same themes cropping up over and over again. Here are the most important points for crafting the perfect persuasive message, all of which have scientific evidence to back them up. Change minds You should be aware that many of these factors interact with each other. Argument strength is also critical. Image credit: Maigh. A Universe From Nothing (Lecture) The observer effect. Hyperspace Physics. Like Minds. The Nature of Reality. Free Science Learning Materials. Jordan Maxwell. SCHOPENHAUER'S 38 STRATAGEMS, OR 38 WAYS TO WIN AN ARGUMENT. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), was a brilliant German philosopher.

These 38 Stratagems are excerpts from "The Art of Controversy", first translated into English and published in 1896. Carry your opponent's proposition beyond its natural limits; exaggerate it. The more general your opponent's statement becomes, the more objections you can find against it. The more restricted and narrow his or her propositions remain, the easier they are to defend by him or her. Use different meanings of your opponent's words to refute his or her argument.

Ignore your opponent's proposition, which was intended to refer to a particular thing. Rather, understand it in some quite different sense, and then refute it. (abstracted from the book:Numerical Lists You Never Knew or Once Knew and Probably Forget, by: John Boswell and Dan Starer) Religion May Cause Brain Atrophy -- Science of the Spirit. List of cognitive biases. Cognitive dissonance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - StumbleUpon.

Blaze 3D. Eye Direction and Lying - How to detect lies from the direction of an individual's gaze / visual accessing cues. Freedom School - Texas. Freedompool. 50 Questions That Will Free Your Mind. 5 Ways To Hack Your Brain Into Awesomeness. 15 Styles of Distorted Thinking.