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Meditation - Its not what you think

Meditation - Its not what you think
It seems everyone is interested in meditation...talking about the wonderful benefits, recommending classes and discussing the different ways to "do it". But, for a beginner, just what is "it"? And how do you do "it"? Our busy, hectic, lifestyles may seem to prohibit this peaceful practice, or provide a convenient "excuse" not to begin, or continue, to meditate...but, the happy news is, you CAN successfully benefit even if you practice for short periods. With the simple technique described below, you will begin and incredible journey. There are 100's of styles, traditions and forms of meditation, but this simple practice has always been highly recommended. Sit comfortably, preferably upright and alert. To sit on a mat, cushion or pillow, sit cross-legged, half or full lotus, depending on your ability. You may close your eyes (unless this causes you to fall asleep) or gaze with almost-closed eyes as if looking downward and inward.

Concentration Exercise — Concentration is the secret key to a whole world of possibilities, enabling you to keep out distractions and focus on attaining your life goals. In addition it is an absolute prerequisite if you want to learn the art of meditation, as it helps ‘clear the road’ of any mental obstacles. However if anything the average concentration span is decreasing as life gets busier and busier and the world becomes filled with more things to distract and scatter our attention. Here is one very easy-to-learn concentration exercise which was taught to me by my meditation teacher Sri Chinmoy. It can reap tremendous rewards in terms of clarity, productivity and efficiency in your life, and it can be done with just a few minutes practise every day. People commonly view concentration as purely a mental exercise; but here we are also going use our heart centre, that space in our chest we point to when we say ‘me’ – helping to take some of the burden away from our tension filled minds. Requirements: Related:

How to Meditate - Guided Meditation Techniques - Buddhist Meditations Magickal Athenaeum - WikiPagan The Magical Athenaeum is the largest collection of magickal PDF books on the internet, with several hundred files. The resource is maintained by Asiya's Shadows. Books are in the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) and may be viewed and printed using Adobe Reader. Magical Athenaeum Paganism & Witchcraft The Odin Brotherhood Odinism and Asatru Pagan Classics at Scribd The Eddas. Grimoires & Classics General Hermetics Thelema Chaos Magick Qabalah Christian Mysticism Rosicrucianism Tarot Theosophy

Brain Waves During Meditation Brain Activity During Meditation The brain is an electrochemical organ (machine) using electromagnetic energy to function. Electrical activity emanating from the brain is displayed in the form of brainwaves. They range from the high amplitude, low frequency delta to the low amplitude, high frequency beta. During meditation brain waves alter. The four categories of these brainwaves: Beta Waves or beta rhythm, is the term used to designate the frequency range of human brain activity between 12 and 30 Hz (12 to 30 transitions or cycles per second). Alpha Waves are electromagnetic oscillations in the frequency range of 8Ð12 Hz arising from synchronous and coherent (in phase / constructive) electrical activity of thalamic pacemaker cells in humans. Theta Waves is an oscillatory pattern in EEG signals recorded either from inside the brain or from electrodes glued to the scalp. Delta Waves are high amplitude brain waves with a frequency of oscillation between 0Ð4 hertz. Theta State ShareThis

Free Guided Meditation Transcendental Meditation Transcendental Meditation (TM) refers to a specific form of mantra meditation called the Transcendental Meditation technique,[1] and can also refer to the organizations within the Transcendental Meditation movement and to the movement itself.[1][2] The TM technique and TM movement were introduced in India in the mid-1950s by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (1918–2008). The Maharishi taught thousands of people during a series of world tours from 1958 to 1965, expressing his teachings in spiritual and religious terms.[3][4] TM became more popular in the 1960s and 1970s, as the Maharishi shifted to a more technical presentation and his meditation technique was practiced by celebrities. At this time, he began training TM teachers and created specialized organizations to present TM to specific segments of the population such as business people and students. History[edit] Among the first organizations to promote TM were the Spiritual Regeneration Movement and the International Meditation Society.

» 12 Essential Rules to Live More Like a Zen Monk “We have more possibilities available in each moment than we realize.” - Thich Nhat Hanh By Leo Babauta I’m not a Zen monk, nor will I ever become one. You probably don’t want to become a Zen monk either, but you can live your life in a more Zen-like manner by following a few simple rules. Why live more like a Zen monk? One of my favorite Zen monks, Thich Nhat Hanh, simplified the rules in just a few words: “Smile, breathe and go slowly.” However, for those who would like a little more detail, I thought I’d share some of the things I’ve discovered to work very well in my experiments with Zen-like living. “Zen is not some kind of excitement, but concentration on our usual everyday routine.” - Shunryu Suzuki Do one thing at a time. “Before enlightenment chop wood and carry water.

Your source for Wiccan, Pagan, Occult, Ritual and Spiritual supplies Is meditation the push-up for the brain? (Medical Xpress) -- Two years ago, researchers at UCLA found that specific regions in the brains of long-term meditators were larger and had more gray matter than the brains of individuals in a control group. This suggested that meditation may indeed be good for all of us since, alas, our brains shrink naturally with age. Now, a follow-up study suggests that people who meditate also have stronger connections between brain regions and show less age-related brain atrophy. Having stronger connections influences the ability to rapidly relay electrical signals in the brain. Eileen Luders, a visiting assistant professor at the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, and colleagues used a type of brain imaging known as diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI, a relatively new imaging mode that provides insights into the structural connectivity of the brain. The study appears in the current online edition of the journal NeuroImage. But there is a "but."

Mindfulness Research: Pictures, Videos, Breaking News The Five Tibetan Rites - Excercises for Healing By Mary Kurus Copyright Mary Kurus 2001, All Rights Reserved Background In 1985 a book called The Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth written by Peter Kelder was published which for the first time fully described an exercise program for "youthing". Potential Benefits of the Five Rites The authors provide many examples of the benefits of the "Five Tibetan Rites" including the following: looking much younger; sleeping soundly; waking up feeling refreshed and energetic; release from serious medical problems including difficulties with spines; relief from problems with joints; release from pain; better memory; arthritis relief; weight loss; improved vision; youthing instead of aging; greatly improved physical strength, endurance and vigor; improved emotional and mental health; enhanced sense of well being and harmony; and very high overall energy. How the Five Rites Work Chakras Chakra is an Indian Sanskrit word that translates to mean "Wheel of Spinning Energy". Detoxification Rite #1 Rite #2

BEGINNER'S GUIDE ... © 1995 Dharman Craig PressonAll Rights Reserved “Zen is not what you think!” -- anonymous Preface The purpose of this little book is to assure that all studentsunderstand the mechanics of Zen practice and the basic teachings ofBuddhism. Part 1: Practice Sitting, Breathing, Walking Seated meditation (J. zazen, Ch. The Sitting Posture (asana) There are several good postures for zazen: four cross-legged, onekneeling, and one using a straight chair or camp stool, as illustrated[Add illustrations of full lotus, half-lotus, sukhasana, Burmese, seiza,and chair sitting]. Breathing One may be given specific instructions by a teacher regarding theproper focus of awareness during zazen. Do not force or control the breath in any way. Walking (Kinhin) Walking meditation may be practiced between sessions of sitting.This relieves the legs of cramps and “pins and needles”, andallows one to begin the process of carrying one’s practice off thecushion and into daily activity. Part 2: Theory The Buddha The Dharma

Purple Phoenix Tarot Science Explores Meditation's Effect on the Brain

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