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Hypercities Earth

Hypercities Earth

http://hypercities.ats.ucla.edu/

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Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies - DECIMA: The Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive, and the Project for a Geo-Spatial and Sensory Digital Map of Renaissance Florence Find using OpenURL DECIMA: The Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive, and the Project for a Geo-Spatial and Sensory Digital Map of Renaissance Florence In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: A project at the University of Toronto, with funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC), is developing a mapping tool that will allow for the spatial organization of early modern historical, cultural, and sensory materials. Called the Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive (DECIMA), it uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software to map, house by house, a 1561-62 Florentine tax census onto one of the best city maps produced in the sixteenth century.

Centre for Global Economic History - Utrecht, the Netherlands Urban data and global economic history Coordinated by Eltjo Buringh (Utrecht University) Much of the recent work done by economists and economic historians analyzing long-term trends in the world economy has used urbanization as a proxy for economic development, and has analyzed data on the number and size of cities and/or the urbanization ratio as measures of the economic success of regions and countries (e.g. Acemoglu et.al. 2005; De Long and Shleifer 1993). Estimates of the size of cities are indeed among the few more or less reliable data available for the pre-industrial age, making it possible to chart and analyse long term trends and spatial structures (De Vries 1984 for a seminal example). Therefore a state of the art global dataset of city sizes can be an important asset for economic historical research.

eAtlas of Gender is launched Gender equality matters for development The education and health levels of women and girls have improved greatly over the years. But in many parts of the world, women are still dying in childbirth, or not being born at all, at alarming rates. Women continue to lack voice and decision-making ability in the household and in society; and, their economic opportunities remain very constrained.

2013 Managing 100 Digital Humanities Projects: Digital Scholarship & Archiving in King’s Digital Lab James Smithies, King's College London; Carina Westling, King's College London; Anna-Maria Sichani, King's College London; Pam Mellen, King's College London; Arianna Ciula, King's College London Modelling Medieval Hands: Practical OCR for Caroline Minuscule Brandon W. Hawk, Rhode Island College; Antonia Karaisl, Rescribe Ltd; Nick White, Rescribe Ltd Urbanization versus GDP per Capita In a recent article on urbanization in China The New York Times presented this graph of the urban population share versus GDP per capita in a selected set of countries: The NYTimes article seemed to suggest that China is trying to achieve an urban population share that is inappropriately high. If the idea was to suggest, for example, that China is trying to achieve the same urbanization rate as Japan but at a much lower level of income, it matters if the data point for Japan is in the right place.

2015 World Population Interactive Map Download: 2015 World Population Data Sheet (PDF: 2.5MB) Explore: Digital Visualization Read: Data Show Gains For Women, But More Progress Needed Teach: Lesson Plan Disclaimer Due to their size, the following countries and territories are not represented on the map: Faro Island, Denmark; Gibraltar; Hong Kong SAR; Liechtenstein; Maldives; Monaco; San Marino; St. Helena Island; and Vatican City. Notes The Data Sheet lists all geopolitical entities with populations of 150,000 or more and all members of the UN.

Visualizing Historical Networks MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO USE GEPHIThose new to Gephi might consider reviewing the online tutorials. These provide a brief introduction to the program's capabilities. Information about importing geographic coordinate data can be found here. Our own data is available on .csv files and can be imported to Gephi for use in your own explorations. Instructions on importing can be found here.

Peak Urbanization? Emerging markets are driving global growth, and 3.5 billion people are moving to cities. That's $20 trillion of infrastructure to lay down. It's either a big problem or an opportunity. -- Peter Henry, dean of NYU's Stern School of Business, New York Times Magazine. Global investors have focused on the opportunities offered by urbanization in emerging markets. What is the Spatial Turn? · Spatial Humanities What is a turn? Humanities scholars speak of a quantitative turn in history in the 1960s, a linguistic and cultural turn of the 1980s in history and literature, and even more recently an animal turn. Beyond the academy, to turn implies retrospection, a process of stopping in the road and glancing backwards at the way by which one has come. May the weary traveler turn from life's dusty road and in the wayside shade, out of this clear, cool fountain drink, and rest “Landscape turns” and “spatial turns” are referred to throughout the academic disciplines, often with reference to GIS and the neogeography revolution that puts mapping within the grasp of every high-school student.

In The World: Mapping the logistics of megacities As ever-larger “megacities” become home to more and more of the world’s people, the supply chains that bring essential supplies to these crowded populations will become increasingly complex. To help manage these logistics, researchers at MIT’s Megacities Logistics Lab have gathered data — collected by 11 MIT students paired with local students around the world — on representative neighborhoods in Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Beijing, Santiago, Sao Paulo, Kuala Lumpur and Madrid. Now that data has been made available online, at no cost, in an open-access pool of information that’s graphically represented on city maps.

About the History Data Service About the History Data Service The History Data Service (HDS) collects, preserves, and promotes the use of digital resources, which result from or support historical research, learning and teaching. The History Data Service is a successor service to AHDS History which from 1996 to March 2008 was one of the five centres of the Arts and Humanities Data Service. The service is housed within the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex. The service provides access and support for a range of historical datasets, promoting and facilitating increased and more effective use of data in research, learning and teaching. Services offered by the History Data Service include:

Uplifting the Cities of the Poor by Edward L. Glaeser, City Journal Summer 2014 Edward L. Glaeser Refugees are flocking to Third World cities like Dhaka, where the population has swelled to 15 million inhabitants. Over the last half-century, a once overwhelmingly rural world has become ever more urban.

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