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250+ Killer Digital Libraries and Archives

250+ Killer Digital Libraries and Archives
Hundreds of libraries and archives exist online, from university-supported sites to accredited online schools to individual efforts. Each one has something to offer to researchers, students, and teachers. This list contains over 250 libraries and archives that focus mainly on localized, regional, and U.S. history, but it also includes larger collections, eText and eBook repositories, and a short list of directories to help you continue your research efforts. death The sites listed here are mainly open access, which means that the digital formats are viewable and usable by the general public. So, such sites as the Connecticut Digital Library (iCONN) are not listed, as they operate on the premise that the user has a Connecticut library card in his or her possession. Efforts were made to go to the root source for these collections. Localized Collections The sites listed below focus on a certain state’s towns, cities, counties, or regions within a given state. Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas Iowa

http://oedb.org/ilibrarian/250-plus-killer-digital-libraries-and-archives/

Research Beyond Google: 119 Authoritative, Invisible, and Comprehensive Resources Got a research paper or thesis to write for school or an online class? Want to research using the Internet? Good luck. There’s a lot of junk out there — outdated pages, broken links, and inaccurate information. Using Google or Wikipedia may lead you to some results, but you can’t always be sure of accuracy. And what’s more, you’ll only be searching a fraction of all of the resources available to you. 30 Fantastic Websites To Lose Yourself In If you follow me on Twitter you might know that I moved to London last September. You might also know that since then I’ve had nothing but trouble trying to get an Internet connection set up in my home. Fortunately, last week I finally got everything up and running and to mark my triumphant return to the world of the Internet I went a little crazy and shared 30 of my favourite websites on Twitter. The majority of them are single-serving sites. Some are very useful while others, others just plain entertaining. Bobby enjoyed the list so much that he suggested I share it with you.

Getting Started in Genealogy Step 1: Do your “home” work. On your mark … In most cases, you will need to know some background information about your family before you go to a library or archives or before you log in to an online genealogy database. The very best way to begin a successful genealogy project is to gather information that you already know about your family, or can find out by talking to relatives and looking at sources that you have in your home. These might include birth and death certificates, obituaries and other newspaper clippings, family Bibles, letters, diaries, the backs of photographs, yearbooks and diplomas or any other family papers. Older relatives often can give you information about previous generations that you may not know.

Cool and Interesting Websites to Visit When You're Bored 30 Jan 2014 Here are some cool and interesting websites that will make you smile and also help beat that afternoon energy slump. couch mode print story I have added these non-tech related websites in my “weekly” bookmarks folder. I don’t visit them every single day but on weekends or when I am feeling bored and they never disappoint. Maybe you should check them out too. The History of Visual Communication - The Masters of Typography Download slideshow >>> The Renaissance is the term used to describe the development of Western civilization that marked the transition from medieval to modern times. In the 12th cent. a rediscovery of Greek and Roman literature occurred across Europe that eventually led to the development of the humanist movement in the 14th cent. In addition to emphasizing Greek and Latin scholarship, humanists believed that each individual had significance within society.

100 Best Open Science Courses on the Web It’s never too late or too early to start expanding your knowledge of science. With the wealth of free courses available on the web, that goal is easier than ever to achieve and can often be done without even leaving the house. The courses listed here will help you get started, offering resources on a wide variety of scientific fields from those that delve into the laws of the universe to those that explain the chemical reactions taking place in your own kitchen. Physics

Ancestors: Records at Risk Not many family records survive. Most people have few if any items that once belonged to a grandparent or great-grandparent. Rarely is a descendant lucky enough to have inherited a locket or comb or watch or Bible or lock of hair, let alone any old letters, diaries, or photographs. What happened to all those items that belonged to people living three or more generations ago? 29 Incredibly Useful Websites You Wish You Knew Earlier There are so many wonderful websites around, and it is difficult to know each and every one of them. The below list provides some of those websites that I find particularly helpful, even though they are not as famous or as prevalent as some of the big names out there. 1. BugMeNot Are you bugged constantly to sign up for websites, even though you do not wish to share your email? If yes, then BugMeNot is for you.

Download Over 250 Free Art Books From the Getty Museum - Yesterday, we wrote about the Wellcome Library’s opening up of its digital archives and making over 100,000 medical images freely available online. If you’ve already made your way through this choice selection (or if the prospect of viewing a 19th century leg amputation doesn’t quite pique your curiosity) have no fear. Getty Publications just announced the launch of its Virtual Library, where readers can freely browse and download over 250 art books from the publisher’s backlist catalogue.

The future of the library: How they’ll evolve for the digital age. Photo by Tom Rossiter from the book Building Ideas: An Architectural Guide to the University of Chicago; Photo courtesy Bexar Bibliotech/Facebook; Photo courtesy Mitch Altman/Flickr; Photo courtesy Marc Hall/NC State University Around the turn of the 20th century—a golden age for libraries in America—the Snead Bookshelf Company of Louisville, Ky., developed a new system for large-stack library shelving. Snead’s multifloor stack systems can still be seen in many important libraries built in that era, for instance at Harvard, Columbia, the Vatican, and at Bryant Park in New York City.

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