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WRITING TOOLS

WRITING TOOLS
Character Pyramid Tool (PDF) Visualize your character’s FLAWS & associated behaviors (for a deeper understanding of this tool, please reference The Negative Trait Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Flaws) Character Target Tool (PDF) Organize and group your character’s POSITIVE ATTRIBUTES by category: moral, achievement, interactive or identity (for a greater understanding of this tool, please reference The Positive Trait Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Attributes) Character Profile Questionnaire (PDF) Not your average character questionnaire! Reverse Backstory Tool (PDF) Work backwards to find your character’s wound, needs & lie (for a deeper understanding of this tool, please reference The Negative Trait Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Flaws) Weak Verb Converter Tool (PDF) Transform all those generic, boring verbs into power verbs Scene Revision/Critique Tool Level 1 & Level 2 (PDF) A ‘light’ and ‘in-depth’ revision checklist for creating compelling characters and scenes

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How To Write A Novel Using The Snowflake Method Writing a novel is easy. Writing a good novel is hard. That’s just life. If it were easy, we’d all be writing best-selling, prize-winning fiction. Frankly, there are a thousand different people out there who can tell you how to write a novel. Evernote, OneNote, and Beyond: The 12 Best Note-Taking Apps Ever feel like you’re struggling to remember everything? You're not the only one—and that's why it's so important to take notes. As author Tim Ferriss says, “I trust the weakest pen more than the strongest memory.” Write something down, and you're certain to remember it. There are plenty of ways to take notes.

10 of My Favorite Writing Craft Sites The writing journey is all about discovering what works best of for each of us as individual, and very unique, writers. Learning from others is valuable in helping us glean tips and fit together the puzzle pieces that will form our own writing processes. Today, I’d like to share with you ten of the sites that inspire, educate, and help me refine my process—plus, they’re run by a bunch of super awesome folks! 1.

Your Scene Needs a Problem By Ken Hughes, @TheKenHughes Part of the How They Do It Series Conflict is a must in every scene, but problems come in a myriad of shapes and sizes. The tricky part is knowing what the right problem for your scene is. To help with that, Ken Hughes visits the lecture hall today to share some thoughts on adding problems to your scenes. Ken Hughes is a Global Ebook Award-nominated urban fantasy novelist, creator of the Whisperers and the upcoming Spellkeeper Chronicles series, and the Power Plays and Unified Writing Theory blogs. He's also been a technical writer for missions to Mars, and a longtime mentor for local authors.

Top of Tree - Tree, outliner for Mac OS X. Horizontally expanding outliner. Tree view In tree view, Tree displays your data in a horizontally expandable tree diagram. This offers you a more intuitive way of working with your outlines. You can easily switch between tree view and a traditional list view while editing your documents. Examples of usage Tree can be used for Imagine Easy Scholar – Imagine Easy Solutions Telling the Math Story: Math in Literature The short story “Charles” by Shirley Jackson, has satisfying twist that most readers never see coming. It is a great example if the use of inference, a challenging concept for students to grasp.

Grammar Rules This is a quick, basic grammar review for nouns, verbs, and the sometimes confusing usage of lay versus lie, and rise versus raise. This reference can be used for term papers, grammar class reviews, or simply for anyone confused or curious about the basics of English grammar. Nouns 1. Noun identification 2. Count, Mass, and Collective Nouns 3. Start Here: How to Get Your Book Published It’s the most frequently asked question I receive: How do I get my book published? This post is regularly updated to offer the most critical information for writers new to the publishing industry, and to provide a starting point for more fully exploring what it means to try and get meaningfully published. If you’d like an in-depth guide on how to get your book published, consider my book, Publishing 101: A First-Time Author’s Guide.For a full-length course, see my 24-lecture series with The Great Courses, How to Publish Your Book.Also, see my recommended guides on writing and publishing. This post focuses on traditional publishing. In a traditional publishing arrangement, the publisher pays you for the right to publish your work for a specific period of time. Traditional publishers assume all costs and pay the author an advance and royalties.

OmPad: Free, beautiful, minimal and inspirational writing web app Welcome to OmPad! Free minimal writing app that helps you focus and concentrate on writing great content. Format your text with headings, bold, italic, links, images, lists, code and quotes. 64 Online Writing Tools For Writers, Bloggers & Authors — The Writing Cooperative 64 Online Writing Tools For Writers, Bloggers & Authors Download a PDF of these online writing tools for your next writing project. Word Processing (More than just Word and Pages) AutoCrit: Manuscript editing software for fiction writers ($5-$12 per month)BlankPage: Geared towards novelists, it focuses on distraction-free writing, with motivators, prompts, outline help and moreByWord: Simple and efficient text editing for Mac, iPhone and iPad ($11.99)Calmly Writer: Distraction-free writing ($2.99)Focus Writer: Distraction-free writing with a hide-away interface. Donation-basedHaven: Writing app for Mac, with extra features for creatives like character trackers, writing goals, prompts and different “scenes” for writingHemingway App: Helps with readability and syntax (Free and $9.99)Ilys: Promotes a writing flow.

Effective characters Helping pupils to develop more effective characters in their story writing. Effective characterisation is not achieved by describing visual features alone (‘He had a light blue top with a faded, frayed collar’) but rather by balancing this kind of descriptive writing with action, motive and a trait, or traits. As motive and actions (and therefore, to some degree, plot) evolve from the characters/s’ temperament/s, emphasising this aspect of characterisation in our teaching leads to more ‘rounded’ characters in pupils’ stories. A successful method of achieving this is for the teacher to dramatise particular character traits and then ask the pupils ‘What kind of character am I ?’ The author begins with sad, happy, angry and shy , all of which are easy to render dramatically.

Short Story Ideas and Creative Writing Prompts Here are lots of short story ideas that you can use as writing prompts. Use these story starters on their own or to get ideas for the CWN online writing courses. You'll also find links to more creative writing prompts at the bottom of the page. Creative Mind Mapping for Novelists Brainstorming ideas seems to be one of the hardest stages in the writing process for many novelists. As I discussed in a previous post, this storm of ideas that flash and thunder in our brains often appears unruly and difficult to harness. I introduced the practice of mind mapping, which is used across many disciplines—such as in classrooms for essay writing and in business meetings to problem-solve. Mind mapping can be used in just about any situation when ideas need to be reeled in and transformed into practical application.

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