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Why Creative People Sometimes Make No Sense

Why Creative People Sometimes Make No Sense
Photo by Sophia. I’ve been having an insightful shuffle through Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s book Creativity: The Work and Lives of 91 Eminent People. Mihaly is a seminal professor of Psychology and Management, and is the Founding Co-Director of the Quality of Life Research Center at Claremont. He writes: “I have devoted 30 years of research to how creative people live and work, to make more understandable the mysterious process by which they come up with new ideas and new things. If I had to express in one word what makes their personalities different from others, it’s complexity. Nine out of the ten people in me strongly agree with that statement. Mihaly describes 9 contradictory traits that are frequently present in creative people: Most creative people have a great deal of physical energy, but are often quiet and at rest. Most creative people tend to be smart and naive at the same time. Most creative people tend to be both introverted and extroverted. Back to Posts

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15-best-brainstorming-and-mind-mapping-tech-tools-for-every-creative-mind In order to be able to see a relationship between various ideas and information, we use mind mapping. This includes gathering thoughts, coming up with new ideas, project planning, and more to solve problems or have novel ideas. Today I compiled thea list of 15 mind-mapping tech tools that will help every creative mind be even more creative. If you like one particular tool I check out sites like Techradar, PCmag, Techriggs and CNET that have many insightful user reviews to get more information. 1. XMind

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Seven design thinking principles for rethinking social sector needs assessment - Tandemic By Kal Joffres The needs assessment is one of the most critical tools to design interventions in the social sector but it is long due for an overhaul. When it comes to understanding the technology needs of social organisations, we’ve been asking the wrong questions for too long. Many assessments still focus on questions such as; the percentage of NGOs that use cloud services or customer relationship management tools. In truth, these kinds of questions tell us very little about how well organisations are using technology.

The policy world and academia offer widely different opportunities for early career researchers. The research career offers a variety of opportunities across sectors. Rachel Glennerster weighs up the differences between the policy world and academia for early career researchers looking at their options. Whilst both may be intellectually challenging environments, the reward structures, collaborative potential and research scope are substantially different and personal preferences of these variations may play a big role in deciding which one would be preferable. As someone who worked as a policy economist for many years (at the UK Treasury and the IMF) before going into research, I am often asked for advice from those trying to decide whether to go into a career in policy or academia. With job market candidates making those decisions now, I decided to summarize my advice in writing. Credit: IMF (public domain)

4 Things We Have Wrong About Creativity “Creativity” may not be the first word that comes to mind when you hear the word “conglomerate.” But Christian Stadil, CEO and co-owner of Denmark-based Thornico, a sprawling enterprise with holdings in food, technology, shipping, and others, will likely change your mind about that. Stadil is so enthusiastic about the concept of creativity that he has co-authored a new book with psychology professor Lenne Tanggaard, who teaches at the University of Aalborg in Denmark. In the Shower with Picasso, out in May, looks at creativity in business, the arts, and other areas and explores how we can all become more creative. In doing so, Stadil says the duo discovered that some of the very fundamental beliefs we have about creativity are wrong.

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10 facts about infidelity, as divulged by Helen Fisher While talking about her research on love at TED2006, Helen Fisher mentioned the issue of infidelity. Here, she dives into the topic of cheating in much more detail. Photo: Robert Leslie Love isn’t so much an emotion, says Helen Fisher in her TED Talk. No, love is a brain system — one of three that that’s related to mating and reproduction. #5 The Four Most Powerful Types of Creative Thinking Considering I’m a creative coach, some people are surprised to learn I’m a little sceptical about creative thinking techniques. For one thing, there’s a lot more to creativity than thinking. It’s possible to sit around having lots of creative thoughts, but without actually making anything of them.

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