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Building a Celtic Roundhouse

Building a Celtic Roundhouse
The walls of roundhouses were either dry stone filled in with clay and straw, or a ring of support poles weaved with wattling and plastered in daub, or a mixture of both stone and wattling as being built here (left). Wattle and daub is one of the oldest building techniques dating back to the Bronze Age and beyond. Wattling is a way to build walls by weaving long flexible sticks in and out of upright posts. Hazel, which is pliable and grows naturally long, is a good species to use for wattle. It is also the preferred wood used by straw bale builders to pin bales together. Daubing is the method used to weather proof the wattle with a mixture of clay, earth (sand), straw and manure. The upright poles are usually around 4-6 inches thick, straight with their ends charred in a fire (see bottom left) and buried about 8-12 inches deep. Related:  Old techniques

Into the wild: 12 secluded homes and structures built away from civilisation A mysterious cottage isolated from the rest of the world. Photo: Amusing Planet. Every now and then, we all dream of living a peace and quiet life off the grid. Maybe the thought creeps up on us when work is starting to feel like Groundhog Day, or perhaps it's just an ongoing internal longing for some real isolation. On this note, we've gathered some of the most secluded homes and structures in the world, all located off the beaten path, among Mother Nature, and deep into the wild. So take a few minutes and venture away from the cramped crowds and tedious traffic by picturing yourself relocating to these dwellings far, far away from civilisation – even if it's just through the land of your imagination. 1. Advertisement Our first thought when laying eyes on photos of The Crystal Mill; is this place even real? Photos by Lady Lone Ranger 2. ​Located on the island of Vágar in the Faroe Islands, the village of Gásadalur possessing breathtaking views holds a small population of 18. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Ancient Art of Stone Tiny Wind & Solar Powered Home Lets You Live Off The Grid Anywhere In The World Ecocapsules, designed by Bratislava-based Nice Architects, promise to let anyone live off the grid for up to a year. Each unit is equipped with solar panels, a retractable wind-turbine, and a design that captures rain water. Inside, you’ll find a kitchenette with running water, a flushing toilet, and hot shower. The Ecocapsule “is suitable for a wide range of applications,” write the designers, such as an “independent research station or a tourist lodge to an emergency housing or a humanitarian-action unit.” Those interested in buying one will be able to pre-order at the end of 2015, with delivery in the first half of 2016. A display unit will be show during the Pioneers festival in Vienna on the 28th-29th of May. More info: ecocapsule.sk | nicearchitects.sk | Facebook | Twitter (h/t: gizmodo) In 2016 you will be able to live off the grid in one of these Ecocapsules The Ecocapsule relies on wind and solar power, and collects rain water But most people might just want to enjoy them

Live Edge Siding An option for siding you may have seen but not known much about is live edge siding. Brian Liloia, a.k.a. Ziggy, is putting some on a strawbale home he’s building and recently shared the photo above on his blog. Live edge siding is basically boards that have not been cut strait on one side. Instead they are left with the natural curves of the tree. You probably won’t find this kind of wood at any big box home improvement store, but through specialty suppliers or directly from the folks that milled the boards. It takes a bit of care to cut boards like this so you might expect to pay a bit more for them. But it’s hard to argue that the extra time, money, and effort isn’t worth it… the final product is very appealing and really gives the home a unique personality. You can follow Ziggy’s strawbale house progress on his blog.

Pearltrees - Organize all your interests - web pages, docs, PDF, notes, file manager 3 Benefits of Roundwood Timber Framing As if it really needed specific mention, wood is a truly precious building resource. Finding new ways to preserve this resource, to be frugal with its use, but to still take advantage of the excellent properties of wood in our home building is a great concern. The use of timbers in building has a long and varied history, and there is growing interest in timber frame home construction — the use of large posts and beams, with traditional wood joinery, and without the use of metal fasteners. Roundwood timber framing uses whole poles, or whole trees for posts, beams, and other framing members. Benefits of Roundwood Timber Framing Roundwood timber framing uses whole trees In typical timber frame construction, trees are milled down to square dimensions — 6×8, 8×8, 8×10, etc. However, if using the roundwood timber framing method, the tree can be used in its entirety. Materials can be grown more readily Roundwood — strong and beautiful Learn Roundwood Timber Framing Related March 1, 2012 July 23, 2011

TinyScan - PDF scanner to scan document, receipt & notes Bali Lumbung I live in Bali. I’ve designed and had built 3 homes here. This is my 3rd – a traditional design built mostly of bamboo, coconut wood, with a grass roof. Built and shared by Carolina Miksch. Dropbox Berry Hill Here are a couple shots of an off-grid cabin my wife and I lived in recently for three years tucked into the woods on the Olympic Peninsula. It was a transformative experience. Owned and shared by Kris Horrocks.

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