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Idiom Connection - Learn Idioms - Most Frequent Idioms - Proverbs

Idiom Connection - Learn Idioms - Most Frequent Idioms - Proverbs

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OneLook: General dictionary sites Browse dictionaries of this type: All, General, Art, Business, Computing, Medicine, Miscellaneous, Religion, Science, Slang, Sports, Technology Limit to those that include: All, Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Spanish Descriptions: Verbose, CompactSort by: Name, Popularity, Word count General dictionaries and glossaries indexed by the OneLook® search engine: AnswerGarden - Plant a Question, Grow Answers! Generate a live word cloud with your audience. Topic (required) Type the topic of your new AnswerGarden. This can be a question or a topic, such as: "What do you think of my website?" More options (optional)

102 Resources for Fiction Writing « Here to Create UPDATE 1/10: Dead links removed, new links added, as well as Revision and Tools and Software sections. Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration. Also, I recommend some resources for Revision and some online Tools and Software. Too many links? List of French words and phrases used by English speakers Here are some examples of French words and phrases used by English speakers. English contains many words of French origin, such as art, competition, force, machine, police, publicity, role, routine, table, and many other anglicized French words. These are pronounced according to English rules of phonology, rather than French. Around 28% of English vocabulary is of French or Oïl language origin, most derived from, or transmitted by, the Anglo-Norman spoken by the upper classes in England for several hundred years after the Norman Conquest, before the language settled into what became Modern English.

Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Tips on How to Write a Great Story By Maria Popova The year of reading more and writing better is well underway with writing advice the likes of David Ogilvy’s 10 no-bullshit tips, Henry Miller’s 11 commandments, Jack Kerouac’s 30 beliefs and techniques, John Steinbeck’s 6 pointers, and various invaluable insight from other great writers. Now comes Kurt Vonnegut (November 11, 1922–April 11, 2007) — anarchist, Second Life dweller, imaginary interviewer of the dead, sad soul — with eight tips on how to write a good short story, narrated by the author himself.

The Big Dream Synopsis: The Big Dream is a low intermediate level interactive story, which roughly follows the plot of the Charles Dickens story Great Expectations. It adapts it to a Japanese setting and tells the story of a young Japanese orphan who grows up and leaves his country home for the city and later New York City, where he finally meets the mysterious benefactor who has influenced his life so much.The syntax that we focus on in this story is listed on the first page under contents and there are thirteen episodes so if a class does one episode a week, the story can last roughly a term/semester. The Big Dream Listen to Episode 1: The Graveyard (mp3), voices by Mark White and Hiromi Campbell. Note: this is meant to be an example of what a guided story might sound like when two people engage with it in a classroom setting. 1.

Setting: Using Scene To Enrich Your Writing In both fiction and nonfiction, the setting is the general background against which your story takes place—the physical location and time period, both of which influence your characters and plot. So how can a creative writer use setting and scenery to further offset, augment, or reflect the action of the plot? Although we’re going to be exploring this issue in terms of fiction, these techniques work for nonfiction as well. These craft techniques work in all genres: poetry, stories, personal essays, memoir, and books. Suppose you’re writing a novel that is set in the Deep South in 1955 and your protagonist is an immigrant facing prejudice and roadblocks at every turn.

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. 10 Everyday Words With Unexpected Origins Books Etymology, or the study of the origin of words, is dry, dusty stuff that will give you allergies if you play with it too long. It also happens to be one of our favorite topics—because sometimes a word travels through such a twisted path to get to its modern meaning that all you can do is scratch your head and wonder how civilization manages to keep itself going. Read on to find out what word got its start with people biting the heads off chickens, how a peaceful word became an international symbol of hate, and how wooden shoes changed the world. What it means now: “Completely lacking in subtlety; very obvious.”

Sharifian - Ten Conversation Lessons with Stories, Vocabulary Practice, Questions and Activities The Internet TESL Journal Farzad Sharifianf.sharifian [at] cowan.edu.auEdith Cowan University (Western Australia) Suggestions for Using the Lessons The Story Depending on the main objective(s) of the course, the teacher may choose to read the story aloud asking the students not to look at it or ask the students to read the story to themselves silently and as quickly as possible. Philosopher's Stone Harry Potter canon: PS | CS | PA | GF | FB | QA | OP | HBP | DH | FW | DP | JKR.COM | TBB | Pm Philosopher's Stone: covers | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 A Reader's Guide to Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Chapter One: The Boy Who Lived

50 Obscure English Words to Impress Your Friends According to the Global Language Monitor, English has more than 1,000,000 words (although even large dictionaries tend to contain about a third or a fourth), more than any other language spoken on Earth (that's more than thrice the amount of words in Spanish alone, another leading language in amount of words). Yet, most people only know 5,000 - 6,000! Of course, often, not much more than that is needed; English has an incredible amount of words with the exact same meaning. As said by About.com, English has only 250,000 - 300,000 when only "normal" words are counted; the rest are obsolete words, technical terms, or jargon that has more or less entered our language. A lot of these words are so bizarre, that you wonder why they were ever coined. Here are fifty of such words that never quite caught on.

20 words that once meant something very different Words change meaning over time in ways that might surprise you. We sometimes notice words changing meaning under our noses (e.g., unique coming to mean “very unusual” rather than “one of a kind”) — and it can be disconcerting. How in the world are we all going to communicate effectively if we allow words to shift in meaning like that?

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