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The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. Westerberg The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not 9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Flipped Classroom | November 2013 Digital Edition 9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Early adopters share how schools can find success with teachers and students alike--even when the technology seems as topsy-turvy as the lessons. In 2007, when Colorado high school teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams began experimenting with recording their lectures in order to spend class time on deeper face-to-face learning with students, they probably didn't foresee the major movement that would grow up around what came to be called the flipped classroom. But six years later, the growth in interest remains exponential, suggesting this is far more than a fad.

Arts Céramiques Jour - Huile Spot et fourrure de lièvre Glaçures: Démystifier un émail céramique classique Espresso Cup (detail), porcelain with John’s SG-12, then Hamada Rust over it, fired to cone 10 in oxidation, 2011. Variations in pattern can be acheived by adjusting the thickness of the undercoat (SG-12) and overcoat (Hamada Rust). To achieve the oil spot effect you must first apply the glaze very thick (¼–3?8 of an inch) and then fire it in oxidation to cone 10 or higher (though it can be done at cone 6, which we’ll get to later). The glaze will bubble vigorously as the iron thermally reduces.

A Step by Step Tutorial on How to Flip your Classroom with TED Ed Below is a visual guide to walk you through the process of how to created a flipped lesson using TED Ed website. First head over to TED ED and :1- Click on " Find and Flip " 2- Find YouTube Videos for your lessons You can search YouTube for a video to build a lesson around. This video will be the centerpiece of your lesson. 3- Click to select that video then click on " Flip this video " 4- Listed /Unlisted Now you can choose whether you want your flipped lesson to be discovered by TED community or not simply by clicking on Listed/Unlisted button.

10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom by Mike Acedo Many of us can recall instances in our lives where we found ourselves idly sitting in a classroom, eyes glazed over, half listening to our teacher as they lectured in front of the room. These scenes are all too familiar in today’s schools, as the traditional model of learning has primarily revolved around a teacher-centered classroom, where instructors focus on conveying information, assigning work, and leaving it to the students to master the material. Though effective for some, this type of instruction has forced students to be merely receptors of information, rather than participants in their own learning processes through active learning.

CTE - Active Learning Research suggests that audience attention in lectures starts to wane every 10-20 minutes. Incorporating active learning techniques once or twice during a 50-minute class (twice to or thrice for a 75-minute class) will encourage student engagement. Active learning also: 7 Fabulous iPad Apps to Create Short Animated Lessons for Your Flipped Classroom Today, however, I am sharing with you a set of some wonderful apps that you can use to create short video lessons and tutorials to share with your students. You can also use them to : Easily explain a range of topics from math to chemistry to music theory to basket weaving.Attach a personal message to any travel photos you want to shareDiagram offensive and defensive strategies for sportsGrade student work with commentary explaining the reasoning behind their performanceImplement a “flipped classroom” Showcase your tutorials online and share your knowledge with your students, friends, family, or the world! I have meticulously handpicked the apps mentioned below and only included what I personally see as the best available out there.

Exploring the Sublime All our Actions are building our Ship for sailing the Universe on our constant Trip through the Wormholes of Space and Time The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea Check out my two-part Education Week Teacher series on the flipped classroom here I’m a bit wary/skeptical about whole “Flipped Classroom” idea and how it works in practice. Diana Laufenberg spoke for me, also, in some of her tweets about the concept: But I’m still open to learning, and I invite your suggestions for additions to list. In the meantime, though, here are some posts that some of my questions more eloquently than I could: The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con is by Mary Beth Hertz and appeared in Edutopia.

Flipped-Learning Toolkit: Overcoming Common Hurdles Jon Bergmann: Here are some tips to overcome some of the hurdles and blunders that we’ve seen commonly happen as teachers flip their classrooms. Aaron Sams: Make sure your students can access the content. We all know that not all students have access to the Internet at their home, so you may have to come up with some other solutions. CTE - Collaborative Learning What is collaborative learning? What is the impact of collaborative learning or group work? What are some examples of collaborative learning activities? How can you design group work activities? How can you manage group work?

The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons. Once students had the option of reviewing the lessons at home, the teachers quickly realized the shift opened up additional time in class for more productive, interactive activities than the lectures they’d been giving. And voila: a movement began.

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