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Tuto de la trousse doublée, zippée et à jolis angles

Tuto de la trousse doublée, zippée et à jolis angles

http://boiteatresor.canalblog.com/archives/2009/02/02/12328190.html

Related:  Travaux d'aiguilles

The Destashification Project Boho Sling Bag Patchy Boho Sling Bag The Boho Sling Bag – plain or fancy. A sewing project for everyone – regardless of their sewing pedigree or experience! The Boho Sling Bag seems to be fairly popular among those that could form the next generation of needle-artists. Casserole Carry-All Sewing Pattern 5 August,2014LindaM Carry your favorite casserole or dessert in style with this insulated carrier with wooden spoon handles! Conveniently created to hold your favorite 9″ x 13″ casserole dish or an 8″ x 9″ dish just by selecting different hook and loop tape configurations, this casserole carrier is perfect for all of your parties and potlucks. Instructions included for a matching pot holder. It’s perfect for hot or cold dishes.

Leena's.com: PatternMaker Tutorial Web Site According to the instructions on this page patterns for basic bodice are drafted using the Scandinavian pattern drafting system. To keep the instructions simple, only centimeters are used. Have your measurements taken according to the instructions on pages and Here are some table measurements you need. All measurements are given in centimeters. Add ease to the measurements of the subject according to the table below.

Pyjama Bag Drawstring bags are very handy to have in your suitcase to organise clothing and supplies. To store Sarah’s new travel themed PJ’s, I made up a little drawstring bag to match. It is an unlined drawstring bag as we didn’t want to add extra weight to our luggage! They will be perfect for storing the Pyjamas in her suitcase on our next holiday. Colourful PJ’s pants, a drawstring bag, and some travel sized toiletries would make a great gift idea for a teenage girl. Size: 11 1/2 x 16 inches ( 29 x 40.5 cm) Tutorial: shirring with elastic thread - Made By Rae I know that a number of you out there are terrified by the concept of shirring with elastic thread. You Fear the Shirr. Shirring is sewing with elastic thread in the bobbin of your sewing machine to create a “smocked” appearance on your fabric (it’s not actually smocking, though; true smocking is a decorative stitching technique done on pleated fabric…my grandma used to hand-smock dresses for me back in the seventies and eighties).

growmama: Tutorial - vintage taie d'oreiller au panier This is the long awaited tutorial detailing how to make your own shopping tote bag from a vintage pillowcase. The blogpost i wrote about the design a few years ago (HERE) has had thousands and thousands of hits and many of you asked for a tutorial....here it is: (in timely fashion...they make great holiday gifts!). If you are looking for the Sew Mama Sew Giveaway post, click HERE.

Tutorials: Decayed Elegance Cuff Bracelet & tattered fabric supplies Each day this week I will be posting a different mixed media art tutorial and campaigning for your votes. I am in the running for a sponsorship from Prilosec OTC and if I get it I will be able to provide FREE Video Art Classes Online. 21 Sewing Terms Every Beginner Should Know   1. Backstitch A backstitch is necessary to secure a line of stitches. Felt Slippers Homemade slippers of thick wool felt make a heartwarming (and foot-warming) gift. Felt is the ideal fabric to work with, since it won't unravel when cut. Felt Slippers How-To1. it's a 2 GIVEAWAY day... before we get to the 2 giveaways for today... I wanted to share what you can create with tim's new metallic stains...

Dress Form Tutorial: Want to make an exact replica of your body for custom work? Yesterday we set out determined to make our own dress forms for the Etsy Labs and thought we'd share the love with you guys if you want to make one of your own or just laugh at our own trails with the duct tape!Materials: A large T-shirt that fits below the bum that will be cut up and destroyed in the processAnother small piece of discard able cloth (a paper towel will do)At least two 45 gram rolls of duct tapeA pair of sharp scissorsCardboard, and cardboard tubingSomething to stuff the form with (peanuts, foam, polyfil, old clothes, be creative)A helperHere's what ya gotta do:Step 1Put on large T-shirt and have your helper begin to wrap the roll of duct tape around your body. Make sure the tape is somewhat smooth and that there are no gaps in between wraps. Stop wrapping once the bust is reached. Step 2Cut several strips of tape from the roll and apply them it a vertical pattern along the curves of the bust for most natural looking shape fit.

syko The winning suggestion this time was given by paperfish who said: i am seeing her with a bicycle in the picture, like she rode to the country on her bike and in the basket is her fabric stash and her sewing machine is magic and works anywhere! I hope you are satisfied with the result, it was VERY challenging, I have never sewn a bike before. Nor did I think I would be able to draw one. But fabric and thread works wonders with my drawings, it continually surprises me. Click here for a close-up of it.

Fit to a T baby romper tutorial part 2: Making the Pattern and Cutting This post is intense, since you are making lots of decisions at this stage. Really it’s much simpler than it looks (isn’t that what they all say?), but I will ask you to please make a test piece to make sure you are perfectly happy with your fit and technique before you cut up your vintage concert T’s! 1) Trace a foundation garment to make a block pattern. Find a garment that fits your intended recipient. I like to use a close-fitting onesie as a sloper of sorts and go from there, so I’ll refer to this chosen garment as a onesie, although a sleeper, romper, or even a T shirt can work too. rose hip View from Blarney Castle, Ireland ...I am by Ireland after our little jaunt there -- by its countryside, coastline, cities, villages, and especially, by its people who charmed me in a big way with their warmth, helpfulness and, to be sure, their infectious sense of humour... If it wouldn't be for missing my children a whole lot, I would have loved to stay on longer and keep roaming through this wonderful country; I definitely want to go back, perhaps with my children this time, to explore more of its many bewitching corners... But for now, let me share with you some of my favourite pics from there: Harcourt Street, Dublin, across the street from our hotel. We started off in Dublin and, even though our stay was short there, I really liked the look of this vibrant city with all its simple but beautiful Georgian brick facades, subtetly decorated by lovely wrought iron details like the window guards and lamp posts you can see above.

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