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Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom

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Engage Now - Student Interactions - teacher heath Do you hear your students say things like: "No! That's Wrong!" "What are you talking about?" "Stop being so bossy!" 26 Fresh ESL Conversation Starters to Get Students Talking! 10 Oct I love teaching conversation in the ESL classroom. Part of it must be that because the students able to “converse” in English are better able to demonstrate their personalities, preferences, thoughts… and therefore, I get to know them better. Often it is simply hilarious to see the range of answers students feel free to share in a comfortable environment. If you’re a conversation teacher in an English as a Second Language classroom, there may be times when you feel as though you want fresh ideas, a change in routine or some way to remain slightly unpredictable so your students remain curious as to what tricks you have up your sleeves.

The Plot The Plot The Plot Question time! What is it that you think they wanted? What do you think is in the barrels? Which mouse is in charge? 5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. 250 Quality Conversation Starters: The Only List You'll Need Share on StumbleUpon0 shares on StumbleUpon Here are some great questions for starting a conversation. There are a lot of random conversation starters to get you started and then conversation questions listed by topic. You can start with the random questions or find a topic that interests you. There’s no right place to start, just scroll down to wherever you want and get started! There are tons of ways to use these questions.

Control Alt Achieve: Video Dubbing Learning Activities for Students When I was a kid, we used to find creative ways to keep ourselves entertained. One of our favorites was the Dubbing Game. Basically we would turn on the TV, find a good show, and then turn off the volume. Then we would make up new lines for the characters on TV (bonus points for using funny voices). I am sure we thought it was much funnier than it really was. As an adult, I have seen the same idea done on the show “Whose Line is it Anyway?” BusyTeacher.org The knowledge and experience they share are fascinating, and they get speaking practice to boot. But you can’t just throw students up front and expect them to succeed. There are important steps to get them ready for upfront speaking. Going through each of these steps will ensure your students are prepared, practiced, and poised when they speak to the rest of their class.

Agreeing and Disagreeing in English This page is about words and phrases that we use when we agree or disagree with someone in English. Stating an opinion In my opinion...The way I see it...If you want my honest opinion....According to Lisa...As far as I'm concerned...If you ask me... Asking for an opinon What's your idea?What are your thoughts on all of this? Wooden Spoon Speculations Copyright © 2014 Emma Gore-Lloyd I found this game on a party games website sometime a couple of years ago. It’s a guessing game that works well in a class of students who are fairly comfortable with each other and have a good sense of humour. Students can use it to practise speculative language. Equipment needed: 2 wooden spoons; one scarf/blindfold First, elicit speculative language from the students, eg.

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