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Business Name Contests - Naming Force

Business Name Contests - Naming Force

http://www.namingforce.com/

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Sales & Marketing Advice I’m going to increase my writing about sales & marketing in the near future. I put a few posts up front that I have already covered in the Startup Series. But I will soon begin a discussion about sales methodologies. Stay tuned. 10 Marketing Tips for Startups How to Get Paid $100 to Name a Company There are a handful of companies that have developed such iconic names that they are instantly recognized wherever you are in the world. Names like Coca-Cola and eBay have near universal recognition so it’s no surprise that professional branding companies often make millions of dollars to come up with these “it” names. Professional branders aren’t going anywhere, but for small businesses that can’t afford the million dollar price tag, there is a new trend called crowdsourcing that allows businesses to outsource the creative process to people like you and I through “naming contests.” There are hundreds of naming contests on websites like NamingForce.com and SquadHelp.com. The way it works is that nameless businesses list a little information about their company and a prize amount for the person who can come up with the best name.

Domain Name Contests Latest Name Contest Winners Domain Name Contests Hold a Domain Name Contest Get Started Latest | Aftermarket | Popular | Expiring | Closed Other Season Leaderboard A Tongal Season is an ongoing program to award the top-performing creators for their high-quality participation across a series of projects. Get Points Finish in the top five for an eligible project and earn Season Points. Get Ranked Season Points and member standings are tracked on the Season Leaderboard. Get Paid

Brainfluence: 5 Brain Tricks to Make Customers Buy Roger Dooley wants your business to succeed. So he's laying down the facts and dissecting recent brain and behavior research to enable you to tap into consumers' brains. Fact No. 1: People aren't always rational thinkers. Why Airbnb’s Awesome: 6 Tips for Turning Your Extra Bedroom into Cash So you’ve decided it’s time to see what all the fuss is about and rent your space out on Airbnb. Congratulations, you’re about to earn some money! I’ve used Airbnb to both rent out my apartment and stay in many others while traveling, and it’s a fantastic way to put your home to work for you. However, taking a few simple steps can make the difference between a great experience and a less-than-satisfactory one. Whether you’re renting out a single room or your entire home, make the most of your Airbnb rental by following these tips. If you do it well, you could add hundreds or even thousands of dollars to your savings account.

Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is a specific sourcing model in which individuals or organizations use contributions from Internet users to obtain needed services or ideas. Definitions[edit] The term "crowdsourcing" was coined in 2005 by Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson, editors at Wired, to describe how businesses were using the Internet to "outsource work to the crowd",[1] which quickly led to the portmanteau "crowdsourcing." Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people, and especially from an online community, rather than from traditional employees or suppliers.[1] This process is often used to subdivide tedious work or to fund-raise startup companies and charities, and can also occur offline.[2] It combines the efforts of numerous self-identified volunteers or part-time workers, where each contributor of their own initiative adds a small portion to the greater result. The term "crowdsourcing" is a portmanteau of "crowd" and "outsourcing"; it is distinguished from outsourcing in that the work comes from an undefined public rather than being commissioned from a specific, named group. Definitions[edit]

Cassette tapes are the future of big data storage - tech - 19 October 2012 THE cassette tape is about to make a comeback, in a big way. From the updates posted by Facebook's 1 billion users to the medical images shared by healthcare organisations worldwide and the rise of high-definition video streaming, the need for something to store huge tranches of data is greater than ever. And while hard drives have traditionally been the workhorse of large storage operations, a new wave of ultra-dense tape drives that pack in information at much higher densities, while using less energy, is set to replace them. Researchers at Fuji Film in Japan and IBM in Zurich, Switzerland, have already built prototypes that can store 35 terabytes of data - or about 35 million books' worth of information - on a cartridge that measures just 10 centimetres by 10 cm by 2 cm. This is achieved using magnetic tape coated in particles of barium ferrite. Using tapes should cut down drastically on energy use, too.

Pet Massage Therapy: A Fun Way to Get Paid to Pet Cats and Dogs We’ve talked before about ways to get paid to spend time with cats and dogs, but this is a new one: pet massage. That’s right: some people earn money for massaging animals. It might sound a little strange, but apparently many cats and dogs enjoy a good massage as much as humans do. If you like petting your furry friends, why not explore this option? With a bit of training you can make $50 per hour as a pet massage therapist. Why Dog Massage?

More Americans Are Using Mobile Phones While Watching TV Thanks to the growth of smartphone adoption, about half of U.S. mobile phone owners use their devices while watching TV, a new study suggests. According to a Pew Internet & American Life Project report, cellphone users not only look up information online in real time and keep themselves occupied during commercials via their handheld devices, they are also interacting with friends. About 23% of cellphone users send text messages to others watching the same show in a different location. Other popular "connected" activities include looking up information mentioned on TV (20% have done so in the last 30 days), posting comments online about a show (11%), playing on phones during commercials (38%) and voting for a reality show contestant (6%). The study — which was conducted among 2,254 American adults ages 18 and older — also revealed that men and women are just as glued to their phones while watching TV (52%).

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