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Rhetological Fallacies

Rhetological Fallacies
Thanks to 李为维, Hayanna Carvalho, Iván Galarza, Klaus-Michael Lux, Kadar Magor, Gilles Peyroux and Adriano Venditti, Rhetological Fallacies is now available in Chinese, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian and Spanish.

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Fallacies Dr. Michael C. Labossiere, the author of a Macintosh tutorial named Fallacy Tutorial Pro 3.0, has kindly agreed to allow the text of his work to appear on the Nizkor site, as a Nizkor Feature. Google’s featured snippets are worse than fake news Peter Shulman, an associate history professor at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, was lecturing on the reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s when a student asked an odd question: Was President Warren Harding a member of the KKK? Shulman was taken aback. He confessed that he was not aware of that allegation, but that Harding had been in favor of anti-lynching legislation, so it seemed unlikely. But then a second student pulled out his phone and announced that yes, Harding had been a Klan member, and so had four other presidents. It was right there on Google, clearly emphasized inside a box at the top of the page: For most of its history, Google did not answer questions.

Figure of speech A figure of speech is the use of a word or a phrase, which transcends its literal interpretation. It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized meaning not based on the literal meaning of the words in it, as in idiom, metaphor, simile, hyperbole, personification, or synecdoche. Figures of speech often provide emphasis, freshness of expression, or clarity. However, clarity may also suffer from their use, as any figure of speech introduces an ambiguity between literal and figurative interpretation. A figure of speech is sometimes called a rhetorical figure or a locution.

9 Ways to Delight Your Facebook Fans Without Giving Away The Farm When it comes to social media marketing, and Facebook in particular, the name of the game is engagement. Conventional wisdom says that the best way to keep your Facebook fans engaged is to reward them, the most obvious way being with free products, discounts and other types of giveaways. For many small businesses or businesses with limited resources, though, doing this on a regular basis is tough. So, instead of thinking of this as a barrier, think of it as a creative challenge. Here are nine other ways the creative marketer can engage and delight their fans and customers without spending a dime. random index deathneyland ganguro attack From the book Group Sex Explosion (Le dernier cri, 1998)

Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed Our minds set up many traps for us. Unless we’re aware of them, these traps can seriously hinder our ability to think rationally, leading us to bad reasoning and making stupid decisions. Features of our minds that are meant to help us may, eventually, get us into trouble. Here are the first 5 of the most harmful of these traps and how to avoid each one of them. 1. Fake news. It's complicated. - First Draft News This article is available also in Deutsch, Español, Français and العربية By now we’ve all agreed the term “fake news” is unhelpful, but without an alternative, we’re left awkwardly using air quotes whenever we utter the phrase. The reason we’re struggling with a replacement is because this is about more than news, it’s about the entire information ecosystem.

Just-world hypothesis The hypothesis popularly appears in the English language in various figures of speech that imply guaranteed negative reprisal, such as: "You got what was coming to you", "What goes around comes around", and "You reap what you sow". This hypothesis has been widely studied by social psychologists since Melvin J. Lerner conducted seminal work on the belief in a just world in the early 1960s.[1] Research has continued since then, examining the predictive capacity of the hypothesis in various situations and across cultures, and clarifying and expanding the theoretical understandings of just-world beliefs.[2] Emergence[edit] Many philosophers and social theorists have observed and considered the phenomenon of belief in a just world.

35 Pest and Disease Remedies Before you begin... My friend and garden assistant, Peggy, tells me that of all the yards she helps tend, mine is the healthiest (although it is not necessarily the tidiest). I credit that health to myriad factors. Every speck of my growing areas (even potted plants) is covered with rich organic matter like aged compost, worm castings, or shredded leaves.

Puzzling Yamantaka Eye (Boredoms, Hanatarash, Naked City) and well-known visual artist and Juke/19 mastermind, Shinro Ohtake, launch a new genre they call "Puzzle Punk" by creating this fake compilation of 24 bands packaged in a stunning book of Ohtake's illustrations. All the tracks by puzzle punk bands with names like City Band, Do Good, Ha Ha Ha, Poo, Rapebeatles, Dr. Drugland, Wipe Out Shock Shoppers, and MC5 or 6, are in fact the work of Eye and Ohtake. Like the Hanatarash/Evil Moisture collaboration posted some time back, this is more like Hanatarash than anything else, but you also get Ohtake's weird collage/found object design/sound sense.

Top 10 Common Faults In Human Thought Humans The human mind is a wonderful thing. Cognition, the act or process of thinking, enables us to process vast amounts of information quickly. For example, every time your eyes are open, you brain is constantly being bombarded with stimuli. You may be consciously thinking about one specific thing, but you brain is processing thousands of subconscious ideas. Unfortunately, our cognition is not perfect, and there are certain judgment errors that we are prone to making, known in the field of psychology as cognitive biases.

US Senate Says Your ISP Can Sell Your Private Data. Here's What To Do Ever since Edward Snowden took off with a cache of top secret NSA documents, and revealed to the world how un-private online user data really was, there has been an obsession with staying private online. That obsession for privacy was protected by the then-Democratic leadership of the FCC who formulated rules last year to that effect. But now all of that work may have been thrown under the bus by the now Republican-dominated US Senate’s decision to scrap those privacy rules.

The Self-Attribution Fallacy Intelligence? Talent? No, the ultra-rich got to where they are through luck and brutality. By George Monbiot.

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