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Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Catalog of Beautiful Untranslatable Words from Around the World

Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Catalog of Beautiful Untranslatable Words from Around the World
by Maria Popova The euphoria experienced as you begin to fall in love, the pile of books bought but unread, the coffee “threefill,” and other lyrical linguistic delights. “Words belong to each other,” Virginia Woolf said in the only surviving recording of her voice, a magnificent meditation on the beauty of language. But what happens when words are kept apart by too much unbridgeable otherness? “Barring downright deceivers, mild imbeciles and impotent poets, there exist, roughly speaking, three types of translators,” Vladimir Nabokov opened his strongly worded opinion on translation. Indeed, this immeasurably complex yet vastly underappreciated art of multilingual gymnastics, which helps words belong to each other and can reveal volumes about the human condition, is often best illuminated through the negative space around it — those foreign words so rich and layered in meaning that the English language, despite its own unusual vocabulary, renders them practically untranslatable.

http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/11/24/lost-in-translation-ella-frances-sanders/

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Pejorative Name slurs can also involve an insulting or disparaging innuendo,[3] rather than being a direct derogatory remark. In some cases, a person's name can be redefined with an unpleasant or insulting meaning, or applied to a group of people considered by the majority to be inferior or lower in social class, as a group label with a disparaging meaning. Also, an ethnic slur or racial slur can be used as a pejorative to imply people of those groups are inferior or deficient.

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge 20 more awesomely untranslatable words from around the world If only you could use these words in Scrabble. Photo: Jeremy Mates When linguists refer to “untranslatable” words, the idea is not that a word cannot somehow be explained in another language, but that part of the essence of the word is lost as it crosses from one language to another. This often is due to different social and cultural contexts that have shaped how the word is used. In the novel Shame, Salman Rushdie’s narrator suggests: “To unlock a society, look at its untranslatable words.” Here are 20 words that don’t translate directly into English; what may these words tell us about the societies in which they come from?

Onomatopoeia A sign in a shop window in Italy proclaims "No Tic Tac", in imitation of the sound of a clock. An onomatopoeia ( i/ˌɒnɵmaːtəˈpiːə/,[1][2] or chiefly NZ /-ˈpeɪə/; from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία;[3] ὄνομα for "name"[4] and ποιέω for "I make",[5] adjectival form: "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the source of the sound that it describes. Onomatopoeia (as an uncountable noun) refers to the property of such words. Common occurrences of onomatopoeias include animal noises such as "oink", "miaow" (or "meow"), "roar" or "chirp".

Syllables, Scrabble Letters, and Picking Brand Names - Rich Barton The Completely Ownable, “Made-Up” Consumer Brand Wins Long Term I wrote this as a private email in 2006 and just refreshed for the blog “Should we call our site something literal or should we make up a new word?” This is a question I often get asked by consumer product/service entrepreneurs. In light of Microsoft’s re-launch of Microsoft MSN Live Search as “Bing”, I thought it timely to re-fresh some old thoughts I’ve had about naming, words, and branding. Daffynition A daffynition (derived from daffy and definition) is a pun format involving the reinterpretation of an existing word, on the basis that it sounds like another word (or group of words). They are similar to transpositional puns, but often much less complex and easier to create. Some daffynitions may be puns. For example, "a hangover is the wrath of grapes" is a play on the title of the book The Grapes of Wrath.

The Problem Femme: On Colette [Hey, y'all! Guess what it is? If you guessed "Tiger Beatdown Pledge Week, AGAIN," you would be totally right-on and a good guesser. If you also guessed "the weekend where Sady shares her THOUGHTS ABOUT BOOKS, ALL AT ONCE, Because of FABULOUS PRIZES," you would be correct. There is so much going on! Online Etymology Dictionary bung-hole (n.) also bunghole, "hole in a cask for a stopper," 1570s, from bung (n.) + hole (n.). Sense extended to "anus" by c.1600. bung (n.) mid-15c., "large stopper for a cask," from Middle Dutch bonge "stopper;" or perhaps from French bonde "bung, bunghole" (15c.), which may be of Germanic origin (or the Germanic words may be borrowed from Romanic), or it may be from Gaulish *bunda (compare Old Irish bonn, Gaelic bonn, Welsh bon "base, sole of the foot"). It is possible that either or both of these sources is ultimately from Latin puncta in the sense of "hole."

Appendix:List of protologisms LOP : English — non-English — unsorted Following is a list of proposed protologisms, with brief definitions. Feel free to add additional suggested words for others to consider, but please do not add articles for them.

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