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Anoushka Shankar plays 'Pancham Se Gara'

Anoushka Shankar plays 'Pancham Se Gara'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CnhcGpmH9Y

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NPR Music's 50 Favorite Albums Of 2015 This is how we listen: Take 12 months, a few thousand albums and pan for gold. We sift for works that are definitive and for sounds or songs that cross boundaries, make connections, teach us something new. We allow ourselves to be swept away, to be seduced, to be fooled by a good new trick or an old one produced with grace and confidence. 2015 was a year in which the fractures in the music industry's bedrock became everyday geography — a no man's land of streaming, downloads, CDs and LPs, with plenty of skirmishes and territory disputes. It was also one in which sales records were not just broken but demolished. Despite all that, it was still just as easy to find great albums and just as hard to narrow them down to 50.

Designing Ambiences in Max/MSP Guest article by Andreas Jonsson DSP beginnings Last year, I undertook a one-year Masters in Sound for Moving Image at the Glasgow School of Art, which got me properly introduced to the wonderful world of DSP and the seemingly endless possibilities of Max/MSP. This is What Michael Jackson Sounds Like in Quechua Even the youngs think Quechua is cool. After the language was translated for a book, a song, and given a shoutout by a fútbolero, we started thinking that Quechua was having a sort of moment. Perhaps the biggest sign of this is that a 14-year-old girl named Renata Flores sang a Quechua version of Michael Jackson’s “The Way You Make Me Feel.” The Ayacuchana sings the tune at the Vilcashuamán ruins, as guitars and a Peruvian cajón play.

The 50 Greatest Jazz Albums…Ever At the end of any year it’s a great time to look back and so we’ve decided to attempt to come up with a definitive list of the 50 Greatest Jazz Albums of all time. Impossible, you are probably thinking, and it probably is, but rather than just thinking of our favourites we decided to take a good look through the web to see what other lists there are and combine our findings. As usual we expect many of you to disagree, sometimes strongly, but as usual we will love hearing from you. It took us several days of searching but here it is, the 50 greatest… 50. Trevor Jones (composer) Trevor Alfred Charles Jones (born 23 March 1949) is a South African orchestral film score composer. Although not especially well known outside the film world, he has composed for numerous films and his music has been critically acclaimed for both its depth and emotion. At the age of five, Jones already had decided to become a film composer. In 1967 he attended the Royal Academy of Music in London with a scholarship and afterwards worked for five years for the BBC on reviews of radio and television music. In 1974 Jones attended the University of York from which he graduated with a Masters Degree in Film and Media Music.

Key Chords Key Chords app generates guitar chord progressions automatically. Use it free online, or get the app for Mac, Windows or iOS (iPad) - Click on a chord to preview how it sounds. - Drag and drop to arrange the chord progression - Tweak the settings to control the playback speed Or role the dice and Key Chords will automatically generate a nice sounding progression. Clint Mansell Clinton Darryl "Clint" Mansell, (born 7 January 1963) is an English musician, composer, and former lead singer of the band Pop Will Eat Itself. Career[edit] Pop career[edit] Soundtrack composer[edit] Film trailers[edit]

Rhiannon Giddens Speaks For The Silenced "This instrument right here, born in Africa, but then made in America and then altered by white America — that's the story of so much of our music," Rhiannon Giddens says of the banjo. John Peets/Courtesy of the artist hide caption toggle caption John Peets/Courtesy of the artist "This instrument right here, born in Africa, but then made in America and then altered by white America — that's the story of so much of our music," Rhiannon Giddens says of the banjo.

Michael McCann (composer) Michael McCann (also known as Behavior) is a Canadian composer for television, video games, and film. He is best known for composing the scores to the video games Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Double Agent , Deus Ex: Human Revolution and XCOM: Enemy Unknown McCann's music incorporates elements of electronic, orchestral and traditional acoustic instruments, and often includes the use of world, choral, and solo vocals (primarily female, and primarily lyric-less). His scoring work, as well as solo and production work, bridges multiple genres including ambient, world, jazz, break-beat, post-rock, trip-hop, drum and bass, industrial, rock and pop. McCann has received award nominations for his work in television, games & film, from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences, IGN, Spike TV Video Game Awards, G.A.N.G.,[1] Hollywood Music In Media Awards (2008 / 2011),[2] and G4TV X-Play. Official Website for Michael McCann

30 Things to Stop Doing to Yourself When you stop chasing the wrong things you give the right things a chance to catch you. As Maria Robinson once said, “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” Nothing could be closer to the truth. Lalo Schifrin Biography[edit] Schifrin was born Boris Claudio Schifrin in Buenos Aires to Jewish parents.[2] His father, Luis Schifrin, led the second violin section of the orchestra at the Teatro Colón for three decades.[1] At the age of six, Schifrin began a six-year course of study on piano with Enrique Barenboim, the father of the pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim. At age 16, Schifrin began studying piano with the Greek-Russian expatriate Andreas Karalis, former head of the Kiev Conservatory, and harmony with Argentine composer Juan Carlos Paz. During this time, Schifrin also became interested in jazz.

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