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Setting Book Lists

Setting Book Lists
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Literature Project - Free eBooks Online The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations is a descriptive list which was created by Georges Polti to categorize every dramatic situation that might occur in a story or performance. To do this Polti analyzed classical Greek texts, plus classical and contemporaneous French works. He also analyzed a handful of non-French authors. In his introduction, Polti claims to be continuing the work of Carlo Gozzi, who also identified 36 situations. Publication history[edit] “Gozzi maintained that there can be but thirty-six tragic situations. This list was published in a book of the same name, which contains extended explanations and examples. The list is popularized as an aid for writers, but it is also used by dramatists, storytellers and many others. The 36 situations[edit] Each situation is stated, then followed by the necessary elements for each situation and a brief description. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Ten rules for writing fiction Elmore Leonard: Using adverbs is a mortal sin 1 Never open a book with weather. If it's only to create atmosphere, and not a charac­ter's reaction to the weather, you don't want to go on too long. 2 Avoid prologues: they can be ­annoying, especially a prologue ­following an introduction that comes after a foreword. 3 Never use a verb other than "said" to carry dialogue. 4 Never use an adverb to modify the verb "said" ... he admonished gravely. 5 Keep your exclamation points ­under control. 6 Never use the words "suddenly" or "all hell broke loose". 7 Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly. 8 Avoid detailed descriptions of characters, which Steinbeck covered. 9 Don't go into great detail describing places and things, unless you're ­Margaret Atwood and can paint scenes with language. 10 Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip. My most important rule is one that sums up the 10: if it sounds like writing, I rewrite it. Diana Athill Margaret Atwood 3 Take something to write on.

The Best Science Fiction Books (According to Reddit) Recently, someone asked Reddit for a list of the best science fiction books of all time. Being a fan of sci-fi, and wanting to expand my own reading list, I thought it would be helpful to tally the results and preserve them here for future reference. I've also included selected quotes from the comments, as well as my own notes on the books I've already read. PS: All book images in this post are copyright Amazon, and were retrieved using my Big Book Search Engine. So, without further ado, here are the Greatest Sci-Fi Books of All Time, ordered by upvote count: Dune Frank Herbert - 1965 "There's a reason it's the global top selling science fiction book of all time." - NibblyPig If you have a chance, track down the excellent full cast audiobook (unabridged!) The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Douglas Adams - 1979 "I really love the cool combination of humor, philosophy, and sheer nuttiness of the entire series." - Scarbrow Ender's Game Orson Scott Card - 1985 Foundation Trilogy Isaac Asimov - 1942

Magical Portraits Of Strangers From Chicago's Wintry Streets Lights In Chicago By Photographer Satoki Nagata As we type this, it is bitterly bitterly cold in Chicago. Heavy snowfall and sub-zero temperatures that are some of the coldest on record are making "the windy city" the "wintry city" in more ways than one. So what better time to discover and reveal the work of local photographer Satoki Nagata He's been braving the icy cold streets over the past 2.5 years to photograph these chilling images of strangers who are battling the elements as they traverse through the cities. The ongoing series is titled "Lights in Chicago", you can see Satkoi's continuing and magical work right here Via Satoki Nagata

Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling goes Beyond the Epilogue - Beyond Hogwarts J.K. Rowling goes Beyond the Epilogue [info from various sources including MSNBC and USA Today] J.K. Rowling has announced in new interviews with the Today show on NBC TV today (July 26) that the epilogue of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows was vague on purpose. She said it was her desire for it to be "nebulous," something "poetic," and that she wanted the readers to feel as if they were looking at Platform 9 3/4 through the mist, unable to make out exactly who was there and who was not. She admitted her original epilogue was "a lot more detailed," including the name of every child born to the Weasley clan in the past 19 years. "But it didn't work very well as a piece of writing," J.K. said. But now that Book 7 is in our hands, J.K. no longer has to hold back any information about Harry Potter. Harry, Ron and Hermione In the book, Voldemort meets his end and Harry lives. "In the early days, everything was up for grabs," she told USA Today. "They made a new world," Rowling said.

Creative Writing Prompts: Secrets and Lies for Your Characters Nothing is better (or more fun for the writer) than a story-relevant secret or lie. Give some dilemma beneath the surface story to give your character depth, add suspense and tension, and keep your reader turning the pages. You can drop hints throughout your writing and when the reveal comes—you will surprise, shock, and delight your reader. Creating a character with a strong internal conflict, secret, or burden makes for one compelling read! Below are writing prompts to help you find some ideas for internal secrets, lies (and therefore conflict) for your characters. Write about a broken promise. Write about a secret. Write about a lie that protects. Write about a lie that is told to hurt. Do this brainstorming throughout the writing of your work in progress. Award-winning novelist Kathy Steffen teaches fiction writing and speaks at writing programs across the country.

DarkCopy - Simple, full screen text editing The 10 Greatest Dystopian Love Stories in Literature This week saw the release of the brilliant Ariel Djanikian‘s debut novel, The Office of Mercy. Djanikian’s book drops you into a deliciously paranoid world that we’re confident will go down in history with the best of them, so we asked her to put together a list of her favorite dystopian love stories (just be sure to mentally add The Office of Mercy to her list). Here’s what she told us: “Dystopian tales seem to go hand-in-hand with scintillating, high-octane love stories: perhaps because dire circumstances have a knack of drawing people together, perhaps because claustrophobic repression makes the highs and lows of love affairs that much more potent. Never Let Me Go, Kazuo Ishiguro Even clones have souls.

The 30 Best Films of the Decade - Part 3 10. Big Fish Painting the 1980s in black and white, Tim Burton made his mark on this decade by discovering primary colors. Every corner of imagination is explored here in a film that has made me cry every single time even after 15 viewings. 9. Most quotable movie of the decade number two, and the movie that was the precursor to the Judd Apatow/Adam McKay takeover of great comedy that followed. 8. It’s a fortunate thing in this art form that audiences often get to see a genius at his best. 7. Despite art being completely subjective, you are wrong if you don’t like this film. 6. Back in 2000, back in the 1970s, Cameron Crowe took us all on a journey across the country in a bus. 5. He was a simple oil man. 4. You can’t argue with the facts. 3. There are two types of people in this world – and I don’t use that cliche lightly: those who have never curled up in a weeping, inconsolable ball on the floor and those who have seen Dear Zachary. 2. 1. Admit it.

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