background preloader

Setting Book Lists

Setting Book Lists

http://www.goodreads.com/list/tag/setting

Related:  Ebooks/Storiesdianemarycowan4Books, articles and more

Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling goes Beyond the Epilogue - Beyond Hogwarts J.K. Rowling goes Beyond the Epilogue [info from various sources including MSNBC and USA Today] J.K. Rowling has announced in new interviews with the Today show on NBC TV today (July 26) that the epilogue of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows was vague on purpose. She said it was her desire for it to be "nebulous," something "poetic," and that she wanted the readers to feel as if they were looking at Platform 9 3/4 through the mist, unable to make out exactly who was there and who was not.

Writing And Editing Fiction: 7 Things To Fix In Your First Self-Edit Writing a book is a process and it can be broken down into parts. There’s the idea gathering and then creative outpouring of the first draft when you can banish critical voice. But then the editing begins, and the first step is self-editing, a crucial part of the process that will also help you save time and money with a professional edit in the next round. Today’s article is from Tania at New York Book Editors, who provide professional editing for independent authors.

It’s D.E.A.R Day! As it turns out, today is National Drop Everything And Read day. Of all the obscure holidays (April is apparently not only home to April Fools Day, which really distinguishes the deluge of assheads from the rest of humanity, but also to National Love Your Produce Manager Day) this is one I can get behind. For the uninitiated (and don’t feel bad if that means you), the holiday is an annual celebration which takes place on April 12 (not coincidentally Beverly Cleary’s birthday) that encourages people to DROP EVERYTHING AND READ! Now, if you’re familiar with Saturday Night Live and more specifically Seth Meyer’s Weekend Update and even more specifically Jacob the Bar Mitzvah boy, “it sure beats doing homework.” For those of us who can’t swing a full on celebration of the day, we’re posing three questions below. Because we like books, and we like you, and we like hearing what books you like.

The 16 Best Dystopian Books Of All Time Dystopian novels—stories of the horrific future—are so common as to be almost forgettable. Here is a compilation of what I believe are the 16 greatest of the genre. I could happily list twice as many that are amazing, but these are the best. From the post-apocalyptic wasteland to deadly viruses to social malaise, all possible bad futures end here. 16. 30 Very Funny Books It's a dreary day, so I thought I'd indulge myself and come up with a list of my favorite comedies. A caveat, however: this is not a fancy English-professor-y list of the finest, most exquisitely crafted, most erudite or intellectually sophisticated works on paper in the language. This is a list of the books that make me laugh until my mascara starts to run. These are books to read over your first cup of coffee or just before you go to sleep . Remember: a day you've laughed is day you haven't wasted--even if you didn't get out of bed. Some days you need a jump-start to get to the funny parts of life.

32 People Reveal The One Book That Blew Their Minds There are probably a handful of books out there that have changed the way you see everything — fiction and non-fiction. Some of them you read in high school or earlier, and others you discovered or rediscovered in your adult life. I went to AskReddit to learn what books have changed people’s lives. Consider this your Spring reading list. 1. One full of intellectual surprises Writing Killer Fight Scenes Fight scenes are dangerous territory for writers. On the surface, they seem as if they’re guaranteed to keep the reader glued to the action in the same way as they often do at the movies. In reality, though, readers tend to skip over fight scenes – skimming the long, tedious, blow-by-blow descriptions in favour of getting back to the dialogue and character-driven drama that truly engages them in the story. My novel, Traitor’s Blade, is a swashbuckling fantasy in which fight scenes are a crucial part of the storytelling. This means having to ensure that every piece of action is vital and engaging; it means that every duel must draw the reader in and not let them go until the end. So how do you keep the pacing, flow, and more importantly, the drama moving forward with so many fights?

20 Books Every Woman Should Read in Her 20s Recently, we stumbled upon this list of “fun” books that every woman should read in her 20s — needless to say, if you’re even a casual visitor to this space, the books (Confessions of a Shopaholic, Bitches on a Budget) aren’t exactly the ones we’d choose. So, perhaps rather predictably, we decided to put together our own list instead. Now, don’t forget, these are books for women in their 20s — we assume you’ve already read as much Jane Austen and Louisa May Alcott as you care to, we expect that you’ve already tackled To Kill a Mockingbird and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Jane Eyre. And though women should read all books about all kinds of things and by all kinds of authors, this list sort of necessarily skews towards both female writers and characters, given the topic of the day.

The 100 Best Books of All Time Many publishers have lists of 100 best books, defined by their own criteria. This article enumerates some lists of "100 best" books for which there are fuller articles. Among them, Science Fiction: The 100 Best Novels (Xanadu, 1985) and Modern Fantasy: The 100 Best Novels (Grafton, 1988) are collections of 100 short essays by a single author, David Pringle, with moderately long critical introductory chapters also by Pringle. For publisher Xanadu, Science Fiction was the first of four "100 Best" books published from 1985 to 1988.

Authors Say Agents Try to “Straighten” Gay Characters in YA « Genreville Editor’s note: The text of this post was written by Rachel Manija Brown, author of All the Fishes Come Home to Roost, and Sherwood Smith, author of Crown Duel and a great many other novels for adults and young adults. I am posting it in order to provide a pseudonymity-friendly space for comments from authors who have had similar experiences to the ones that Rachel and Sherwood describe. I strongly encourage all authors, agents, editors, publishers, and readers to contribute to a serious and honest conversation on the value and drawbacks of gatekeeping with regard to minority characters, authors, and readers, and to continue that conversation in all areas of the industry. –Rose Say Yes To Gay YA

Related:  Book ListsBooksMust-readbooksReading Writing Fun StuffWritingLiteratureLiteraturenext booksBook suggestionsmuhammedjailaniBooks to ReadEnglishLiteratureInteresting StuffBooksBooks