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The most annoying sound in the world

The most annoying sound in the world

3D Paintings on Panes of Glass Using multiple layers of clear glass, Canada based David Spriggs and Chinese born Xia Xiaowan, transform flat artwork into 3D sculptures. Viewers are treated to different shifting perspectives of the works based on where they stand in the art space. Spriggs work revolves around powerful explosive imagery, often resembling storms, cosmic blasts or firework like explosions. See Also INCREDIBLE 3D ILLUSTRATIONS JUMP OUT OF THE SKETCHBOOK For more on David Spriggs see his beautiful website at davidspriggs.com or for more on Xia Xiaowan see Wikipedia Above and Below: Xia Xiaowan’s distorted 3D figures Artist: Xia Xiaowan Below: David Spriggs beautiful paintings fill the room with stormy emotion. Artist: David Spriggs Artist: David Spriggs Source: amusingplanet.com

5-Step Secret To Great Fiction by Suzanne Harrison Stephen King says he starts his novels with a "What if?" question. What if a woman and child are trapped in a car by a rabid dog? What if a family pet buried in a Pet Semetary came back to life? I have also heard many other bestselling novelist such as Jodi Picoult, Janet Evanovich and Nicolas Evans lay claim to the same thing. And I have heard others say they just saw an image in their mind, or had a persistent sentence knocking on the inside of their brains, and they just followed that to where it lead them. And while their insight and tutelage is invaluable, when I was a budding writer it left me with another question. What's next? It's all good and fine to have a starting point. So in answer to the "What next?" Step One: Desire It is essential that your main character want something. This "desire line" is the golden thread that will run through your story. For example, in a love story, the object of desire is the beloved. Step Two: Conflict or Opposition

- StumbleUpon A Thoughtful Look at Men and Women SHE DRIVES FOR A RELATIONSHIP. HE'S LOST IN THE TRANSMISSION By DAVE BARRY CONTRARY to what many women believe, it's fairly easy to develop a long-term, stable, intimate, and mutually fulfilling relationship with a guy. Of course this guy has to be a Labrador retriever. With human guys, it's extremely difficult. Beautiful Watercolor Landscapes (12 pieces) Z.L. Feng grew up in Shanghai and began painting at the young age of seven. After experimenting with all kinds of different mediums, he finally settled on a favorite - watercolor. The artist always revered the medium because of its level of difficulty. One of Feng's favorite places to find inspiration is in the countryside of Virginia's New River Valley. Before coming to the U.S. in 1986, Feng received his BFA degree from Shanghai Teacher’s University and taught in its art department for four years. Z.L.

Neither the Billionaire nor the Tramp: Economics in Speculative Fiction by Jeremy L. C. Jones I sat at a table full of professors and tried to explain the idea of world-building. This was five years ago. Jeff VanderMeer and I (along with about a dozen others) were scrambling to put the final touches on Shared Worlds, a writing and world-building camp for teenagers at South Carolina's Wofford College. There was a math professor, an English professor, a few historians, and a mix of others from a mysterious world I think of as "The Sciences." I babbled on, trying to figure out how to bridge the "lingo" gap and get everyone to understand. Of course, I didn't really need to bridge anything. Then an Associate Professor of Accounting and Finance named Dr. "You should have a class on economics at Shared Worlds," he said. My first thought, I am ashamed to say, was, Eew! "Economics!" My expression, I'm sure, was somewhere between blank and horrified. "Really," he assured me, "economics. Swicegood would later explain, "Economics is about exchange and incentives." This went on for a while. N.

50 Life Secrets and Tips Memorize something everyday.Not only will this leave your brain sharp and your memory functioning, you will also have a huge library of quotes to bust out at any moment. Poetry, sayings and philosophies are your best options.Constantly try to reduce your attachment to possessions.Those who are heavy-set with material desires will have a lot of trouble when their things are taken away from them or lost. Possessions do end up owning you, not the other way around. Become a person of minimal needs and you will be much more content.Develop an endless curiosity about this world.Become an explorer and view the world as your jungle. Stop and observe all of the little things as completely unique events. Try new things. Read “Zen and the Art of Happiness” by Chris Prentiss.This book will give you the knowledge and instruction to be happy at all times regardless of the circumstances.

sidewalk chalk guy sidewalk chalk guy «« back to gprime.net all material copyrighted by its original creator | 100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! 21 Responses to “100 Exquisite Adjectives” Rebecca Fantastic list!

Online Drawing Course - Drawing on the Right Side of the brain The natural inheritance of everyone who is capable of spiritual life The natural inheritance of everyone who is capable of spiritual life is an unsubdued forest where the wolf howls and the obscene bird of night chatters Drawings by Eugene Andolsek Title: Henry James Sr. writing to his sons via The Duke of Peckham Update: See Field of Vision' s 2010 post on Andolsek Will 50 Watts 25 Things Writers Should Stop Doing I read this cool article last week — “30 Things To Stop Doing To Yourself” — and I thought, hey, heeeey, that’s interesting. Writers might could use their own version of that. So, I started to cobble one together. And, of course, as most of these writing-related posts become, it ended up that for the most part I’m sitting here in the blog yelling at myself first and foremost. That is, then, how you should read this: me, yelling at me. If you take away something from it, though? Then go forth and kick your writing year in the teeth. Onto the list. 1. Right here is your story. 2. Momentum is everything. 3. You have a voice. 4. Worry is some useless shit. 5. The rise of self-publishing has seen a comparative surge forward in quantity. 6. I said “stop hurrying,” not “stand still and fall asleep.” 7. It’s not going to get any easier, and why should it? 8. 9. The mind is the writer’s best weapon. 10. 11. 12. Writers are often ashamed at who they are and what they do. 13. Yeah, yeah, yeah. 14.

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