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Academic Phrasebank

Academic Phrasebank
The Academic Phrasebank is a general resource for academic writers. It aims to provide you with examples of some of the phraseological 'nuts and bolts' of writing organised according to the main sections of a research paper or dissertation (see the top menu on the left). Other phrases are listed under the more general communicative functions of academic writing (see the bottom menu on the left). The resource should be particularly useful for writers who need to report their research work. The phrases, and the headings under which they are listed, can be used simply to assist you in thinking about the content and organisation of your own writing, or the phrases can be incorporated into your writing where this is appropriate. In most cases, a certain amount of creativity and adaptation will be necessary when a phrase is used.

http://www.phrasebank.manchester.ac.uk/

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Assignment Calculators The University of Minnesota Libraries has created an enhanced version of the Assignment Calculator currently in beta (January 2009). It allows faculty and students to adapt their own assignments from a bank of existing assignments (e.g. research paper, speech, video, etc.) or create their own from scratch. This new version of the Calculator is tied to University of Minnesota internet ID's; therefore you will need a password to access it. Please contact us if you need a username and password to allow you access to the beta. We hope to make the source code for the beta available late spring 2009 Thanks!

Mock Reading Paper - Culture Shock This reading test contains 10 questions. You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. To make it more authentic, download the test and do it with pen and paper. Read the passage below and answer questions 1-10. What you need to know about Culture Shock Academic reading & writing Constructing the Paragraph A Tutorial and Self-testing Program for American English in Academic Settings It is recommended that you try each Self-test first. If you have trouble understanding the content, or receive a score of less than 75%, go to the related Tutorial, and then try the Self-test again. To My Old Master In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdon Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdon — who, since being emancipated, had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded spectacularly by way of the letter seen below (a letter which, according to newspapers at the time, he dictated).

Exercises Exercises Here you will find exercises based on concordance lines. If you are not familiar with studying concordance lines, look at the explanations in Concordances. On To The Conference Interview! (This post is an update of an earlier post, “How Not To Fuck Up Your Conference Interview.” ) You have submitted your cover letter, your c.v., and your recommendations. And lo! Cohesion: linking words and phrases 1.33 Cohesion: linking words and phrases You can use words or short phrases which help to guide your reader through your writing, and to link sentences, paragraphs and sections both forwards and backwards. Good use will make what you have written easy to follow; bad use might mean your style is disjointed, probably with too many short sentences, and consequently difficult to follow. Your mark could be affected either way. The best way to "get a feel" for these words is through your reading. Most textbooks and articles are well-written and will probably include a lot of these cohesive devices.

Forest carbon calculators: A review for managers, policymakers and educators You are using an outdated version of Firefox which is not supported by ResearchGate anymore. For a faster, safer browsing experience, upgrade your browser now. <div class="c-box-warning full-width-element" style="text-align: center; "><div style="margin: auto; padding:10px;" class="container"><b>For full functionality of ResearchGate it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the <a href=" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser</a>.</b></div></div> Article

Hey Mama by Kiese Laymon A black mother and her son talk about language and love in the South. Image by Jennifer Packer, Mario II, 2012. Courtesy the artist Hey Mama, I’m feeling alone this morning. Learning Academic Vocabulary Here are some suggestions about using the AWL Highlighter and the AWL Gapmaker to help you expand your academic vocabulary. 1. Find a text that interests you. For on-line sources, look at the links page. Copy and paste, or type it into the AWL Highlighter; process it and print it.

Research Statement *Note: This is an archived letter from my tenure case from 2009-10. Dear Provost Everts: In 1998, not yet knowing the protocol for enacting change on a university campus, I wrote a letter and mailed it to the president of Virginia Commonwealth University, where I was studying for my MFA in poetry. I requested him to consider implementing Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) in the graduate school because our in-state peers had already done so. (My hope was to get permission to compose a digital, interactive, multimedia-rich poetry thesis based on poetic and rhetorical theories of hypertext, and to have that work count under the ETD aegis.) To my surprise, he agreed and appointed me to an ETD Task Force, out of which I helped craft implementation standards and produced the first born-digital thesis at that school.

Sounds Familiar? What you can hear You can listen to 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips chosen from two collections of the British Library Sound Archive: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. You’ll hear Londoners discussing marriage and working life, Welsh teenagers talking with pride about being bilingual and the Aristocracy chatting about country houses. You can explore the links between present-day Geordie and our Anglo-Saxon and Viking past or discover why Northern Irish accents are a rich blend of seventeenth century English and Scots. You can study changes in pronunciation among the middle classes or find out how British Asians express their linguistic identity. What you can do

Giving a technical presentation (giving a scientific talk) by Michael Ernst January, 2005 Last updated: March 29, 2016 Contents: Introduction If He Hollers Let Him Go - by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah Discussed: Ohio’s Rolling Farmland, Hippies in Tie-Dye, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Kanye West, Oprah, A Simpler Way of Life, Seventy-Year-Old Comparative Literature Professors in Birkenstocks, Negritude,Thurgood Marshall, Black Activism, Patrice Lumumba, Stepin Fetchit, Richard Pryor, Dick Gregory, Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson, Hemp Stores, Reuben Sandwiches, Dusk in Yellow Springs Although the city of Dayton is small and has been hit hard by the decline of industry, in Xenia and Yellow Springs the land is green, fecund, and alive, even in the relentless heat of summer. Xenia is three miles from where the first private black college, Wilberforce, opened, in 1856, to meet the educational needs of the growing population of freed blacks that crossed the Ohio River. Yellow Springs, a stop on the Underground Railroad, was initially established as a utopian community in 1825. In 1852, Horace Mann founded Antioch College and served as its president. Chappelle’s comedy found fans in many worlds.

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