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Cover Letter

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5 cliché cover letter lines you should avoid at all costs. Three years ago, job search expert Jenny Foss wrote one of my favorite articles on cover letters.

5 cliché cover letter lines you should avoid at all costs

It was called, “Bad Pick-Up Lines: They Don’t Work in Bars, They Don’t Won’t in Cover Letters.” (Yes, I remember it even three years later.) Even after reading that article, it took me some time—longer than I’d like to admit—to step outside of the “I am writing to apply for [position]” lead-in, because it’s what I was comfortable with. But it’s 2015, and people are still writing form letters, which leads to the spread of terrible advice like, “No one reads cover letters anyway.” It’s not that no one reads them. So, read on for the five of the most cliché lines to strike from your cover letter immediately. 1. Years ago, when applications were sent through the mail and secretaries sorted through letter after letter, it was probably really important to dedicate your opening line to the job you were applying for. Of course, I’m not suggesting you never mention the position. 2. 3. 4. 5. 3 cover letter tips for people who haven't written one in forever. A couple of weeks ago, I wrote an article called “3 Editing Secrets That Will Make Your Cover Letter Even Better.”

3 cover letter tips for people who haven't written one in forever

To which a dear (and succinct, and purposefully overdramatic) friend wrote, “Can’t you just HELP ME WRITE MINE?!?” Where was she stuck? In her words: “Is it terrible to say I haven’t written [a cover letter] since college and don’t even know where to start anymore?” No, it’s not terrible. And I think a lot of people—those changing careers, those who landed previous roles through networking and never submitted a formal application, and those who have been in the same job for the better part of a decade—are all in the same boat. 1. When Writing Your First Draft, Don't Be Afraid to Write Like Crap. Why You May Want to Consider Using Helvetica Typeface for Your Resume. 3 editing secrets for writing your best cover letter yet.

You know that it’s beneficial to have a second set of eyes review your application materials.

3 editing secrets for writing your best cover letter yet

Someone who can tell you that your resume looks good—except for that part where you misspelled your own name (FYI, you can check that, too!). Or that your writing sample is impressive, but that it would be even better if you used the correct version of “their.” But sometimes, no one is available. Maybe a contact said he would help but hasn’t replied since, and you don’t want to pester him. Or maybe you’re taking a chance in your letter and you’re afraid feedback from your stuck-in-the-mud roommate will make you lose your nerve and play it safe. So what should you do? 1. You know why you’re perfect for this job. So, take the advice that you surely received from some English teacher at some point, and “Show, don’t tell.”

Ask yourself, if a stranger handed you your cover letter, what impression would it make? 2. Honestly, one of the best cover letters I ever wrote was also the riskiest. 3 career experts share the keywords that stand out on a cover letter. Cover letters are tough to crack.

3 career experts share the keywords that stand out on a cover letter

They're the lengthier cousins of resumes, requiring you to call upon your writing skills and explain why you deserve the job. It can be a frustrating process, one that sometimes feels like a blatant cry of, "Please just hire me already! " 4 Inside Secrets To Writing A Great Cover Letter. Let’s agree you should always send a cover letter, it’s just the professional thing to do.

4 Inside Secrets To Writing A Great Cover Letter

Nonetheless, statistics show 50% of employers don’t read them and the others scan it in 5-10 seconds. Slacking on your cover letter? I wouldn’t hire you. Clarify the Word "Motivated" on Your Resume or Cover Letter. Vocare: Emailing a cover letter? Attachment or in the body of the email? QUESTION If someone says to email a cover letter (along with resume, writing sample, etc.), should I send the cover letter as the body of the email, or attach it separately?

Vocare: Emailing a cover letter? Attachment or in the body of the email?

It seems more natural to make the email body the cover letter, since that's the whole point of a cover letter in the first place. What do you think? ANSWER You should write a real cover letter and attach it to the email. Why? If the purpose is to get hired by the OFFICE, your letter may be passed around. But how, then, should you use the email? Your email should give enough information about you and about the goal of your communication so that you could be contacted – even without the attachments. 1. 2.

Dear Mr. I am a first year law student at the University of Minnesota Law School applying for a summer clerkship with your firm. Add a Strong Closing Sentence to Your Cover Letter to Seal the Deal. How to Write a Cover Letter That Employers Will Actually Read. Write Your Cover Letters Like Your Job Depends on It (Because It Does)