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The Nine Worlds.


Golem. Prague reproduction of Golem In Jewish folklore, a golem (/ˈɡoʊləm/ GOH-ləm; Hebrew: גולם‎) is an animated anthropomorphic being, created entirely from inanimate matter.


The word was used to mean an amorphous, unformed material (usually out of stone and clay) in Psalms and medieval writing.[1] Unicorn. Aliens, myths, and ancient tech. 'Atlantis' All mythologies. Norse Mythology. Conspiracy Theorists. Alternative History / Independent Perspectives - Videos/Articles. Plato's Symposium. Robin Hood - The Facts and the Fiction - Legends, Stories, Songs. IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA.

Family tree of the Greek gods. Key: The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font.

Family tree of the Greek gods

See also List of Greek mythological figures Notes External links Media related to Family trees of Greek mythology at Wikimedia Commons. Loch Ness Monster. The Loch Ness Monster is a cryptid, a creature whose existence has been suggested but is not discovered or documented by the scientific community.[3] It is reputedly a large unknown animal that inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands.

Loch Ness Monster

It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal's existence has varied since it was first brought to the world's attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings. Origins Loch Ness History. Folktexts: A library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology, page 1. Greek mythology. Greek mythology is explicitly embodied in a large collection of narratives, and implicitly in Greek representational arts, such as vase-paintings and votive gifts.

Greek mythology

Greek myth attempts to explain the origins of the world, and details the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and mythological creatures. These accounts initially were disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition; today the Greek myths are known primarily from Greek literature. Sea monster. Sea monsters are sea-dwelling mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size.

Sea monster

Marine monsters can take many forms, including sea dragons, sea serpents, or multi-armed beasts. They can be slimy or scaly and are often pictured threatening ships or spouting jets of water. The definition of a "monster" is subjective, and some sea monsters may have been based on scientifically accepted creatures such as whales and types of giant and colossal squid. Sightings and legends[edit] Plate ca. 1544 depicting various sea monsters; compiled from the Carta Marina. Hittite/Hurrian Mythology. The Hurrians occupied the land between the Hittites and Assyria, having descended from the mountains south of the Caspian Sea.

Hittite/Hurrian Mythology

They ruled the kingdom of Mitanni. In the late 15th century B.C. the Hittite empire's beginning is marked by an influx of Hurrian names into the royal family. Tudhalyas I (1420 B.C.) reunited Western Anatolia under Hittite rule, and retook Allepo but lost the Black Sea coast to the Kaska tribes. After some difficulty with the Mittani the Hittites resurged under King Suppilulimas around 1344-1322 taking a firmer hold on Syria.

Myths and legends. Chinese mythology. Chinese mythology refers to those myths found in the historical geographic area of China: these include myths in Chinese and other languages, as transmitted by Han Chinese as well as other ethnic groups (of which fifty-six are officially recognized by the current administration of China).[1] Chinese mythology includes creation myths and legends, such as myths concerning the founding of Chinese culture and the Chinese state.

Chinese mythology

As in many cultures' mythologies, Chinese mythology has in the past been believed to be, at least in part, a factual recording of history. Thus, in the study of historical Chinese culture, many of the stories that have been told regarding characters and events which have been written or told of the distant past have a double tradition: one which presents a more historicized and one which presents a more mythological version.[2] Historians have written evidence of Chinese mythological symbolism from the 12th century BC in the Oracle bone script. Major concepts[edit] Moai. Moai facing inland at Ahu Tongariki, restored by Chilean archaeologist Claudio Cristino in the 1990s Moai i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.[1] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter.


Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The moai are chiefly the living faces (aringa ora) of deified ancestors (aringa ora ata tepuna).[2] The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but most were cast down during later conflicts between clans. Description[edit] The moai are monolithic statues, their minimalist style related to forms found throughout Polynesia. List of mythologies. This is a list of mythologies of the world, by culture and region.

List of mythologies

Mythologies by region[edit] Africa[edit] Central Africa[edit] East Africa[edit] Aztec mythology. Fairy tale. For a comparison of fairy tale with other kinds of stories, such as myths, legends and fable, see Traditional story.

Fairy tale

Fairy tales are found in oral and in literary form. The history of the fairy tale is particularly difficult to trace because only the literary forms can survive. Still, the evidence of literary works at least indicates that fairy tales have existed for thousands of years, although not perhaps recognized as a genre; the name "fairy tale" was first ascribed to them by Madame d'Aulnoy in the late 17th century. Many of today's fairy tales have evolved from centuries-old stories that have appeared, with variations, in multiple cultures around the world.[4] Fairy tales, and works derived from fairy tales, are still written today. Folklorists have classified fairy tales in various ways. Terminology[edit] Roman mythology.

Roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans. "Roman mythology" may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to the subject matter as represented in the literature and art of other cultures in any period. The Romans usually treated their traditional narratives as historical, even when these have miraculous or supernatural elements. The stories are often concerned with politics and morality, and how an individual's personal integrity relates to his or her responsibility to the community or Roman state. Heroism is an important theme. John William Waterhouse: Comprehensive Painting Gallery.

All mythologies. Mermaid. Grimm Brothers' Home Page. Compiled by D. L. Ashliman © 1999-2013 Contents Return to: Chronology of their life 1785. 1786. The children of Philipp Wilhelm Grimm and Dorothea GrimmFriedrich Hermann Georg Grimm (1783-1784) Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm (1785-1863) Wilhelm Carl Grimm (1786-1859) Carl Friedrich Grimm (1787-1852) Ferdinand Philipp Grimm (1788-1844) Ludwig Emil Grimm (1790-1863) Friedrich Grimm (1791-1792) Charlotte (Lotte) Amalie Hassenpflug, neé Grimm (1793-1833) Georg Eduard Grimm (1794-1795) 1791. 1796. 1798. 1802. 1803. 1806. 1808. 1812. Anglo-Saxon paganism. Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.

[citation needed] The right half of the front panel of the seventh century Franks Casket, depicting the pan-Germanic legend of Weyland Smith also Weyland The Smith, which was apparently also a part of Anglo-Saxon pagan mythology. Jewish folklore. Middle Ages[edit] Myth, Legend, Folklore, Ghosts. Mythology, folklore, and religion. World Myths and Legends in Art (Minneapolis Institute of Arts) Canaanite/Ugaritic Mythology FAQ. By Christopher B. Siren cbsiren at alum dot mit dot edu based on John C. Gibson's and S. H. Last modified: May 25th 1998: Corrected several spelling errors. May 25th 1996: Added an entry on Molech. March 30th 1996: Fixed a couple of Lucian typos, added a biblical link. Japanese mythology.

Irish mythology. Bunworth Banshee. Native American mythology.