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Don’t End a Meeting Without Doing These 3 Things. When a sports team finishes a game, they usually don’t gather up their gear and immediately leave the court, rink, field or locker room.

Don’t End a Meeting Without Doing These 3 Things

The players and coaches take a few minutes for a post-game meeting – a ritual that’s just as important as the pre-game warm-up. In our view, participants in business meetings can benefit from the same exercise. A quick post-meeting wrap-up with attendees before they leave the room goes a long way to ensuring the gathering achieved what it set out to, and that future get-togethers will also prove successful. Here are three steps to take at the end of each meeting though you can, of course, dial up or down each component as the situation warrants. Once you’ve done this in person, make sure to follow up in writing, as well. Confirm key decisions and next steps. Develop communication points. This was not a one-time event, but the beginning of this group coming together as a senior leadership team.

Maker vs. Manager: How To Schedule For Your Productivity Style. Are you a manager or are you a maker?

Maker vs. Manager: How To Schedule For Your Productivity Style

Or are you both? Maybe it depends on the day of the week or maybe it depends on your mood, but knowing which hat you’re wearing can make or break your ability to get what you need done for the day. What’s the big deal? Well, being able to identify your role, even if it’s temporary, will allow you to properly schedule your day for maximum productivity. A simple way to think of your role is maker vs. manager. Each of these distinct designations require a different type of schedule. The Maker’s Schedule The maker’s schedule is comprised of long stretches of uninterrupted time. Long: You should be able to block out however much time you need to get “in the zone.”

When you have standup meetings, status update meetings, every conceivable meeting in your day, the reality is you will not get what you need done. The Manager’s Schedule. The Future of Work in 5 Charts - The Cooper Review. Here are 5 charts that show you the future of work, based on the present, which is likely the past depending on when you’re reading this.

The Future of Work in 5 Charts - The Cooper Review

Middle Management 1. The size of Middle Management will swell as the number of people who aren’t that important flood the workforce. Updates. 9 Nodding Strategies for Your Next Meeting — The Cooper Review. 10 Tricks to Appear Smart During Meetings – The Cooper Review – Medium. Like everyone, appearing smart during meetings is my top priority.

10 Tricks to Appear Smart During Meetings – The Cooper Review – Medium

Sometimes this can be difficult if you start daydreaming about your next vacation, your next nap, or bacon. When this happens, it’s good to have some fallback tricks to fall back on. Here are my ten favorite tricks for quickly appearing smart during meetings. 1. Draw a Venn diagram Getting up and drawing a Venn diagram is a great way to appear smart. 2. If someone says “About 25% of all users click on this button,” quickly chime in with, “So about 1 in 4,” and make a note of it. 3. There comes a point in most meetings where everyone is chiming in, except you. 9 Tricks to Appear Smart in Brainstorming Meetings – The Cooper Review – Medium. The following is an excerpt from my new book, 100 Tricks to Appear Smart in Meetings (October 4, Andrews McMeel).

9 Tricks to Appear Smart in Brainstorming Meetings – The Cooper Review – Medium

In a brainstorming meeting, the pressure of coming up with incredible new ideas can be debilitating. Luckily, the last thing most corporations want is new ideas. Here are 9 tricks to make you look like you’re the creative force on your team. 1. Leave to get water and ask if anyone needs anything Just before the meeting starts, get up and ask if anyone needs anything. 2.

While the topics are being introduced, grab one of those sticky note pads and start drawing meaningless flowcharts. 3. When everyone is trying to define the problem, make an analogy about baking a cake, or something just as completely unrelated. Board Meeting.