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10 Ways to Sabotage Your Classroom Management

10 Ways to Sabotage Your Classroom Management
By Jennifer Gonzalez You know the basics: Establish clear rules and consequences, be consistent, keep students engaged. But even with all that in place, the small things you do could be wreaking havoc on your whole system. Here are some habits you might have developed that are messing with your classroom management, along with more effective alternatives. 1. Smiling at the Wrong Times This was a big problem for me. Alternative: Make a conscious effort to hold a neutral, “on-task” facial expression when you need your class to be focused. 2. Addressing student misbehavior in a public way risks embarrassing the student, and if she is prone to being oppositional, she’s likely to talk back and dig herself into a deeper hole. Alternative: Whenever possible, address off-task behavior in private. Others just speak in a quiet voice by the student’s desk or call the student up to their own. 3. So many behavior problems start with students simply not understanding what they are supposed to do. 4. 5.

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