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Untitled. Ted Simmons and Maryanne Ellison Simmons pose with some of the more than 800 works of art they collected over the years that now belong to the St.

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Louis Art Museum. Thank You, St. Louis. Untitled. Aaron and Musial were so similar in so many ways.

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Devoted family men. Great but gracious. Both played for an organization for more than two decades. Neither were ever ejected from a game. Untitled. Forward passes, for one thing, had been attempted before, most recently in an experimental game in late 1905 between Washburn and what would become Wichita State before the new rules were approved in early 1906.

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You're About to Know Jack. With increasing regularity in recent years, Jack Flaherty has been on message.

You're About to Know Jack

From the first stare at himself in the mirror each morning to the first glance out the window at the rest of the world, his missives are delivered—both to himself and to others—with focus, passion and thought. They begin with himself. His workday. Rosenthal: What players with underlying health concerns say about a possible return. Untitled. Untitled. Ted Simmons elected to Hall of Fame. SAN DIEGO -- For Ted Simmons, the fourth time is the charm.

Ted Simmons elected to Hall of Fame

The former Cardinals catcher was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on the Modern Baseball Era ballot, announced Sunday at the Winter Meetings in San Diego. Candidates must receive votes from at least 75 percent of SAN DIEGO -- For Ted Simmons, the fourth time is the charm. The former Cardinals catcher was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on the Modern Baseball Era ballot, announced Sunday at the Winter Meetings in San Diego. Candidates must receive votes from at least 75 percent of the ballots to gain election to the Hall, and Simmons received 13 votes from the 16-member electorate (81.3 percent) . • Miller, Simmons elected to HOF on Modern Era ballot.

Were The Best Umpires Behind The Plate During The Playoffs? Major League Baseball umpires heard their job approval ratings plummet in Washington, D.C., during this World Series, culminating with chants of disdain from Nationals fans after missed calls on Sunday in Game 5.

Were The Best Umpires Behind The Plate During The Playoffs?

ESPN's 'The Ocho' Is Back, but Is Axe Throwing a Sport? We Asked. Last year on ESPN2, The Ocho’s most-viewed event was the prime-time broadcast of the Dodgeball World Cup, which drew 247,000 average viewers.

ESPN's 'The Ocho' Is Back, but Is Axe Throwing a Sport? We Asked.

The Ocho’s average total audience rose 150 percent from 2017 after it moved to “The Deuce” from ESPNU in 2018. Definitions of what qualifies as a sport usually include some combination of three criteria: physical exertion, a demonstration of skill and a competitive element. Respondents roughly weighed each of those attributes equally. The public ranks this week’s featured events quite low in comparison with more traditional sports such as basketball or soccer, including stone skipping (16 percent say it’s a sport), stupid robot fighting (14 percent) and competitive pizza making (13 percent). On average, 30 percent of the public deems The Ocho’s offerings as sports. The Black Athlete in America. Untitled. Chicago Blackhawks owners Bill Wirtz and James Norris owned the old Arena on Oakland Avenue before the Blues were born as a NHL expansion team.

So it's no coincidence that they put one of their minor league affiliates, the Braves, in that building to drive business. That franchise moved from Syracuse and the Eastern Professional Hockey League during the 1962-63 season. NBA: Kevin Love of the Cleveland Cavaliers opens up on mental health. The Cleveland Cavaliers All-Star was, after all, quietly receiving therapy for an anxiety battle he had kept hidden from the public.

NBA: Kevin Love of the Cleveland Cavaliers opens up on mental health

But Love came to realize that saying the words "panic attack" and describing his episode publicly were part of the recovery process, and could benefit others suffering in silence. "It's been therapeutic, and it's been good to share my experience and try to help. " The pressure on male athletes to suppress mental health issues only made his condition worse, Love wrote in the essay. He said he hoped to break down that wall for other pros facing anxiety or depression. Chris Correa: What ex-Cardinals analyst learned after prison, Astros hack. Eu.usatoday. - The Washington Post.

Tommy Pham - ScoopsWithDannyMac.com. In full sprint, Rangers Minor Leaguer Eric Jenkins made a catch, tumbled over the wall and stuck the landing. Eric Jenkins is a 21-year-old outfield prospect in the Rangers organization who currently plays for the Down East Wood Ducks, Texas' Class A affiliate in the Carolina League.

In full sprint, Rangers Minor Leaguer Eric Jenkins made a catch, tumbled over the wall and stuck the landing

So far this season, Jenkins is hitting .250/.301/.338 for the Wood Ducks, but it's his defense that has everybody talking at the moment. On Sunday, a local sports anchor/reporter named Alex Turner uploaded this absolutely ridiculous video of Jenkins tracking a fly ball, charging over toward the left-field wall, making the grab, tumbling over the fence with a half-cartwheel move and firing the ball back toward the field. And he made it look like a routine play, too: . @Rangers prospect @Jenk_02, y'all. Keep an eye on this young man ... Cardinals OF Tommy Pham sounds off about his road to the big leagues.

Just because I have more time to watch games doesn’t mean my picks will be better, but here are my brackets this year. Hochman: Nearly 50 years ago, this Big Red player staged his own NFL anthem protest. Inspiring America: This NFL Star Traded Football Field for Farm Field. Election of Donald Trump Deepening Racial Divide in NFL Locker Rooms. "One of the greatest days of my life," a white offensive lineman from the AFC told B/R.

Election of Donald Trump Deepening Racial Divide in NFL Locker Rooms

"Easily one of the worst days of my life," said a black offensive lineman, also from the AFC. "It's like my dog died. Worse. " The reaction from NFL players to me in the wake of Donald Trump's election as the nation's 45th president was swift and long-lasting. It carried through election night, into the next morning, and throughout Wednesday. The general feeling among the six white players with whom B/R communicated was that the Trump election was good for the country and happened because Americans wanted change and a fixing of economic issues. In sharp contrast, eight black players I spoke with expressed the sentiment that the Trump election was one of the ugliest moments in American history and was about white America wanting to keep blacks, and other people of color, as one black player said, "in our place.

" Meanwhile, several black players expressed a different view of some fans. Kaepernick’s protest is as American as that flag. Friday night, in a league whose business is Americana, Colin Kaepernick took a stand rarely seen in pro sports. It wasn’t from his seat on the sideline, where he paid no regard for the national anthem in its favorite game. It was after — when Steve Wyche of the NFL Network asked why he sat while others stood. Kaepernick is asking for justice, not peace. Friday night, in a league whose business is Americana, Colin Kaepernick took a stand rarely seen in pro sports. Russian Insider Says State-Run Doping Fueled Olympic Gold.

Pressure to Win Dr. Rodchenkov’s revelations, his first public comments since fleeing, come at a crucial moment for Russia. DW on Sport. No Evidence of Lleyton Hewitt Fixing Matches. Why Betting Data Alone Can’t Identify Match Fixers In Tennis. NFL pulls out of funding Boston University head trauma study over concerns about researcher. 10:58 AM ETSteve FainaruCloseESPN Senior WriterWinner, 2008 Pulitzer Prize in International ReportingFour-time first-place winner in Associated Press Sports Editors competitionCo-author of New York Times best-selling book, "League of Denial"Mark Fainaru-WadaCloseESPN Staff WriterInvestigative reporter for ESPN's Enterprise and Investigative Unit since 2007Co-author of New York Times best-selling books "League of Denial" and "Game of Shadows"Co-winner, 2004 George Polk Award.