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TALKING hands

TALKING hands
Just give them a try – these talking heads are terribly easy to make. You need A4 colored paper sheets, a pair of scissors and some paper glue. Let the show begin To make a MONSTER, glue some extra eyes and teeth on the inside. To make a FROG, add some eyes and a red mouth on the inside. To make a CLOWN, roll up some paper strips for hair, glue it to the back of the ‘head’ then add eyes, a tongue and a pom-pom nose. To make a CHICKEN, add a long beak, eyes and a crest. To make a PARROT, add eyes, feathers and an elongated beak.

http://krokotak.com/2012/11/talking-hands/

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THE HUNGRY FROG: AN INTERACTIVE COUNTING BOOK FOR PRESCHOOL AND EARLY CHILDHOOD Frogs, frogs, frogs! Practice counting and early math skills with this interactive book. *Please note that this product is included in my Frog Bundle: Activities for Preschool and Early Childhood. DIY: Wearable words When I was looking around for tutorials on making paper beads, I found some really striking "book beads" and accessories, now collected in this post. I understand (after all the browsing) that you can make really durable "beads" easily ... very little time, skill or money required. Woohoo! Who doesn't need more jewelery?

Craft DIY Projects, Patterns, How-tos, Fashion, Recipes @ Craftzine.com - Felting, Sewing, Knitting, Crocheting, Home & More Quilling, the coiling and shaping of narrow paper strips to create a design, has been around for years — hundreds, in fact. During the Renaissance, nuns and monks would roll gold-gilded paper remnants trimmed during the bookmaking process, and use them to decorate religious objects as an alternative to costly gold filigree. Quilling later became a pastime of 18th and 19th century young ladies in England, who would decorate tea caddies and pieces of furniture with paper filigree. The practice crossed the Atlantic with colonists, who added quilling to candle sconces and trays as home decorations. Oriental fans with paper plates With students of Year 6 we painted some fans in Oriental style, with colorful watercolors on the background and silhouettes of bamboo plants and branches with cherry blossoms painted in black ink. For the fans we merely used half of a paper plate! Like this: Like Loading...

Comics in the Classroom: Why Comics? Throughout the month of August, Teach.com and Reading With Pictures are bringing you Comics in the Classroom, a blog series about using comics in education, including why graphic novels are complex texts as defined by the Common Core Standards, how to use graphic texts to teach in the content areas, how and where to find the best graphic texts, and more. We hope you’ll join us and bring the power of comics to your classroom! The following guest post is written by Tracy Edmunds, M.A., Curriculum Manger at Reading With Pictures “It always strikes me as supremely odd that high culture venerates the written word on the one hand, and the fine visual arts on the other. Yet somehow putting the two together is dismissed as juvenilia. Why is that?

Animal PAGEHOLDERS Here’s an easy way to make reaching out for a book even more exciting and desirable Make a funny pageholder You can print out the templates from here. I printed them out several times on white cardboard paper and once – on green cardboard paper. corbeille avec des sacs plastiques Recycling ideas: basket out of nilon bag Material - Plastic bags- Scissors, needles, Instruction: Step 1: - Cut off the bottom of the handle of bags.

page corner bookmarks This project comes to you at the request of Twitterer @GCcapitalM. I used to believe that a person could never have too many books, or too many bookmarks. Then I moved into an apartment slightly larger than some people’s closets (and much smaller than many people’s garages) and all these beliefs got turned on their naïeve little heads. But what a person can always look for more of is really cool unique bookmarks. Placeholders special enough for the books that are special enough to remain in your culled-out-of-spacial-necessity collection.

Digitprop - Paper design This is the official announcement for the papercraft alphabet I just finished uploading. That was quite some work, especially with two hyperactive kids climbing all over me while I am typing. By the way, if you speak German: Hätte auch auf Deutsch funktioniert. Anyway, the alphabet is now complete – a collection of 26 papercraft templates for all letters 0f the alphabet, each representing an animal, thing, or people starting with that letter: You will find the complete list of templates here. You can use them for education, as toys, or to spell out whatever message you want to get across. Owls, Foil, Glue, and Shoe Polish (original artwork by David, grade 5) Art Club, Grades 1-6 This is one of my all-time favorite projects. The technique has been around for years, and I've loved using it several times with my students.

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Pansy and Dahlia Fabric Flower Tutorial Photography by James Ransom for Martha Stewart Living I’m so excited to share this fabric flower tutorial from Martha Stewart Living with you. Such beauties!

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