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Apprendre à apprendre : l’accès à l’autonomie

Apprendre à apprendre : l’accès à l’autonomie

http://competencescles.eu/

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Our Growth Mindset Please forgive me if you have already heard me refer to the concept of “growth mindset,” a notion we owe to the renowned Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, whose book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, is one of the most thought-provoking texts about human psychology to have been published in a long time. For Dweck, much of how people approach the challenges they face in life, as well as the way in which they define their sense of satisfaction in meeting those challenges, hinges on the outlook they have on the world. NB.

CourseTalk - Advancing MOOCs This public-private partnership aims to harness the power of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) to help young adults across the developing world grow successful careers, potentially leading to stronger economies. Research on MOOCs has been sparse, and the first year of the project will seek to alleviate this data gap. TASCHA will use surveys, interviews and an analysis of more than 70,000 course reviews posted on CourseTalk by students around the world to study awareness and usage of MOOCs among 18 to 35 year olds in Colombia, the Philippines and South Africa.

9 English Word Pairs that Confuse Absolutely Everyone We all know English is a crazy language. Lots of different words share the same spellings and pronunciations. Some of these words are confusing even for native speakers, especially in writing. For example, when do we use “affect” and when do we use “effect”? Or what about the verbs “to bear” and “to bare”?

How to Trust Your Students Education is catastrophically deficient in trust. Pro-accountability education reformers presume that, absent carrots and sticks, classrooms would be overrun with lazy and incapable teachers. Traditional instructors presume that, absent carrots and sticks, classrooms would be overrun with lazy and incapable students. Both viewpoints emerge from a noble desire to make classrooms high-performance spaces, but in actuality they suppress excellence. Exemplifying an exasperating phenomenon that would make Karl Marx tsk, teacher mistrust metastasizes, particularly in the most underserved classrooms. Poor students and minorities, prejudged with the most ungenerous stereotypes, are consigned to the least constructivist and democratic classrooms (Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2000; Solomon et al., 1996).

Working Memory by Saul McLeod published 2008, updated 2012 Atkinson’s and Shiffrin’s (1968) multi-store model was extremely successful in terms of the amount of research it generated. The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids What do we make of a boy like Thomas? Thomas (his middle name) is a fifth-grader at the highly competitive P.S. 334, the Anderson School on West 84th. Slim as they get, Thomas recently had his long sandy-blond hair cut short to look like the new James Bond (he took a photo of Daniel Craig to the barber). Unlike Bond, he prefers a uniform of cargo pants and a T-shirt emblazoned with a photo of one of his heroes: Frank Zappa. Mind Maps® about Mind Mapping This is the Mind Maps about Mind Mapping area of our Mind Mapping Examples Library. You'll find a number of maps all about Mind Mapping. Including 'The Uses of Mind Maps' and 'Principles of Mind Mapping'.

ESL Lounge: Songs for English Teaching. Free song lyrics. using songs in the esl classroom It's great to use songs in the class, if only to do something a little different. But beyond using them solely to give your students some 'light relief', there are many other ways songs can be used in ESL classrooms to consolidate what students have already learnt. Have a song to request? Go to our contact page. 15 creative & respectful ways to quiet a class Have you fallen into the trap of saying “No talking!” or “I need quiet!” all day long? It’s exhausting to keep repeating your requests for silence, and after the hundredth time, kids just tune you out, anyway.

Entrance testing is not the answer University students need to learn to write for different disciplines and assignments, and testing the skills they learned in high school isn’t relevant to what they will need to learn. by Roger Graves and David Slomp We commend Nicholas Dion and Vicky Maldonado for calling for assessments of university students’ writing (“We need to assess student literacy skills”) in University Affairs.

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