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Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog

Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog
We recently posted, “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article,” which highlighted key items to look for on a website when determining its credibility. The infographic found here summarizes the content from the blog post and students can use it as a guide when using news sources in research. Post, print, or share it with your students or others! Looking for other resources related to website credibility? We’ve listed some of our favorites below the infographic! Channel One News: Lesson Plan: How to Spot Fake News This lesson plan, by Channel One News (a Houghton Mifflin Harcourt company), includes discussion questions, a writing activity, and a video that can be shown to students to help them understand that they shouldn’t believe everything that they read or hear. The News Literacy Project’s Ten Questions for Fake News Detection This checklist can be distributed to students to help them determine if a news article is fake or not. Websites to Test Your Students Related blog posts:

http://www.easybib.com/guides/evaluating-fake-news-resources/

Related:  Cittadinanza digitaleInformation and digital literacyFake newsInquiry

15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers via Edudemic Google is usually one of the first places students turn to when tasked with an assignment. Whether it’s for research, real-time results, or just a little digital exploration … it’s important they know how to properly Google. Lucky for teachers (and students, of course), Google has a handy set of lesson plans that are just waiting to be unleashed upon the leaders of tomorrow.

Information literacy won't save us... “Some men just want to watch the world burn.” (Image c/o Patrik Theander on Flickr.) In the wake of both the EU referendum and the election of Trump in the United States, there has been a growing concern about the proliferation of “fake news” and the rise of post-truth politics. As William Davies puts it in The New York Times, facts are “losing their ability to support consensus” as we enter “an age of post-truth politics”. This kind of talk is, of course, catnip for library workers because it plays into certain narratives that have dominated the discourse in recent years, specifically the rising importance of information literacy. Although I would not dismiss the importance of information literacy in terms of education and providing the tools individuals need to think critically about the information they find, we need to be careful not to overplay its effects.

10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog For many of us, 2016 is going down as a year to forget. Election upsets, Zika, the Syrian crisis, and unfortunately tons of fake news about all of the above and everything in between. Denzel Washington was recently quoted as saying, “If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. UW class on how to spot fake data goes viral within hours Two University of Washington professors are taking aim at BS in a provocatively named new course they hope to teach this spring. The professors would like to push the course materials online — teaching it as a MOOC, for example, a freely available course taught over the web. When it came to picking a title for the course they will teach this spring, University of Washington professors Carl Bergstrom and Jevin West decided to abandon academic stodginess and get edgy. Their new course title?

From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg in 14 Lessons The full News Literacy course, developed at Stony Brook University, organizes the material into 8 concepts that are spread amongst our 14 week course that take students from the first information revolution of Johannes Gutenberg's printing press to the Digital Age of Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook. Each lesson stands alone or can easily be integrated into your program. Below, find a summary of each of those lessons, and a link to the most updated version of the teaching materials for each from our professors at Stony Brook University. Each of the following Course Packs include PowerPoint presentations, associated media, lecture notes, and recitation materials.

Information Literacy Introduction Welcome to the online Information Literacy training programme. Participants are being offered an enjoyable and rewarding programme of learning and experience which will lead to a certificate of participation from the School Library Association. This course has been created by Lin Smith and is largely born from two decades of work in large secondary schools with differing demographics. In addition Lin has added the insight previously gained from posts in both reference and special libraries.

Blue Feed, Red Feed What is this? Recent posts from sources where the majority of shared articles aligned “very liberal” (blue, on the left) and “very conservative” (red, on the right) in a large Facebook study. In 2015, the journal Science published a research paper by Facebook scientists (Bakshy, Eytan; Messing, Solomon; Adamic, Lada, 2015, “Replication Data for: Exposure to Ideologically Diverse News and Opinion on Facebook”, Harvard Dataverse, V2) which looked at how a subset of the social network’s users reacted to the news appearing in their feeds. For six months, Facebook tracked and analyzed the content shared by 10.1 million of its users (who were anonymized). These users had identified their political views in their own profiles on Facebook. Analyzing these users’ political labels, the researchers categorized each as very liberal, liberal, neutral, conservative or very conservative.

5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News : NPR Ed Students in Scott Bedley's fifth-grade class at Plaza Vista School in Irvine, Calif., play a version of "Simon Says" with fake news. Courtesy of Scott Bedley hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of Scott Bedley Students in Scott Bedley's fifth-grade class at Plaza Vista School in Irvine, Calif., play a version of "Simon Says" with fake news.

Taking information literacy lessons into Google Classroom Valerie Dewhurst, Librarian at QEGS Blackburn recently made her first step in to moving her information literacy lessons online. Her school has moved to Google Classroom, and she emailed me about her first online lesson. Firstly my main priority was to make sure students know just exactly what Information Literacy actually means/covers ….. So students are being well-informed as I go on to explain that IL is a set of abilities requiring individuals to recognise when information is needed, and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. This initial breakdown has worked well, and is getting us off to a really good start.

Can the Queen Legally Kill President Trump with a Sword? Claim: Queen Elizabeth asserted she has the legal authority to kill President Trump with a sword should he enter Buckingham Palace. false Example: [Collected via e-mail, February 2017] Origin:On 31 January 2017, the British web site The Daily Mash reported that Queen Elizabeth had made a shocking statement regarding her authority should U.S. President Donald Trump visit Buckingham Palace: THE QUEEN has confirmed that if President Trump makes a state visit, she can kill him with a sword and nobody can touch her.Palace staff have assured the Queen that, according to English law, Trump is a subject of the Crown and can, if judged to be damaging the monarchy, be dispatched without repercussion.She said: “I haven’t made up my mind yet.

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