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Rhymes for Kids, Nursery Rhymes for Kids, Short Nursery Rhymes, English Rhymes for Kids

Rhymes for Kids, Nursery Rhymes for Kids, Short Nursery Rhymes, English Rhymes for Kids

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Top 10 Ways to Remember the ABCs All this week some of the members of the Kid Blogger Network are sharing resources to keep kids learning while school is out. Whether your child has been busy learning letters all year or you’re just looking for some fun ways to expose your child to the alphabet,, this collection of activities should give you tons of ideas for helping kids remember the ABCs. Many of the ideas include a summer twist, but they could be used any time of the year. **This list is updated with new activities regularly.

800 FREE Speaking Worksheets Learning to speak a new language is definitely a challenge. It’s very difficult for your students to do if they don’t practice on a regular basis. Luckily, you need to look no further because BusyTeacher.org has the tools to help your students practice their speaking - and want to do it, too! Reading Comprehension Worksheets "Your reading comprehension materials are the best I've found on the web. They are so thorough and comprehensive! My students and I have learned a lot from them. Thanks so much!" -- Susan B., Carter, KY. 03/21/12 Like these materials? Watch a clever teacher annoy the back row of class to teach all students an important lesson. A high school teacher wanted share an important life lesson with his students. But a dull lecture just wouldn't do. So he planned a simple interactive exercise. All he needed was some scrap paper for each student and a recycling bin at the front of the room. He set up the exercise by telling the class that they represent the country's population and everyone has a chance to get rich. But there was a catch:

Learn with Play @ home: The A-Z of Learning Letters. 90+ ways to teach your child all about Letters. Letters are everywhere! It's no wonder that often long before children start school they will start talking about, noticing and questioning about letters. For parents, it can sometimes be hard to know when is the best time to start teaching your child about letters and how to go about it? When to start "teaching" your child about letters? I believe that Children need to be exposed to letters, through reading books with their parents, from birth. The entirety of their lives should be filled with books, words and text and learning about letters should be as much a part of everyday life as brushing your teeth.

summer review websites for kids As the school year starts to come to a close, I’m beginning to receive e-mails and questions from parents wondering what they can do over the summer to ensure continued progress. I made a summer review packet for first graders entering 2nd graders a few weeks ago. I also just recently made one for second graders entering third grade here. In addition to summer review practice pages, I also offer my parents a list of fun and educational websites that their child can cool off with on those hot, summer days.

The 8 Minutes That Matter Most I am an English teacher, so my ears perk up when writers talk about their process. I've found the advice handy for lesson planning, too. That's because both writing and planning deal with craft. 20+ Activities to Start Learning Letters To continue on our quest to reading, we’re continuing on reviewing [for Henry] and learning letters [for George] right now. They have to know them before reading, right? Be sure to check out what Jillian of A Mom with a Lesson Plan is sharing about Reading Rewards today for our summer reading program! The very first step is to recognize letters.

8 ways teachers can talk less and get kids talking more If you do fewer teacher-directed activities, that means the kids will naturally do more talking, doesn’t it? Not necessarily. I have often found myself talking almost constantly during group work and student-directed projects because I’m trying to push kids’ thinking, provide feedback, and help them stay on task. Even when the learning has been turned over to the students, it’s still tempting to spend too much time giving directions, repeating important information, and telling students how they did instead of asking them to reflect on their work.

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