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How To Tell Fake News From Real News In 'Post-Truth' Era. Behind the fake news crisis lies what's perhaps a larger problem: Many Americans doubt what governments or authorities tell them, and also dismiss real news from traditional sources.

How To Tell Fake News From Real News In 'Post-Truth' Era

But we've got tips to sharpen our skepticism. Turnbull/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption toggle caption Turnbull/Getty Images/Ikon Images Behind the fake news crisis lies what's perhaps a larger problem: Many Americans doubt what governments or authorities tell them, and also dismiss real news from traditional sources. Are we really in a post-truth era? The presidential campaign was filled with falsehoods. But let's properly define the problem.

Business, government, churches and the media have fallen in public esteem. Hazardous as the post-trust era may be, it shouldn't cause despair. What we all need, as citizens, is to develop more skill in applying our skepticism. Propagandists obviously have fun (and profit from) trying to con us, the public. What does post-truth mean for a philosopher?

Image copyright NCH "Post-truth" has come to describe a type of campaigning that has turned the political world upside down.

What does post-truth mean for a philosopher?

Fuelled by emotive arguments rather than fact-checks, it was a phrase that tried to capture the gut-instinct, anti-establishment politics that swept Donald Trump and Brexit supporters to victory. Oxford Dictionaries made it the word of the year, defining it as where "objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief". But what does this new world mean for academics and scientists whose whole purpose is trying to establish objective facts? AC Grayling, public thinker, master of the New College of the Humanities, and Remain campaigner, views the post-truth world with undisguised horror.

The philosopher, awarded a CBE in the New Year Honours, warns of the "corruption of intellectual integrity" and damage to "the whole fabric of democracy". Image copyright iStock "It's terribly narcissistic. Image copyright Reuters. How to Convince Someone When Facts Fail. Have you ever noticed that when you present people with facts that are contrary to their deepest held beliefs they always change their minds?

How to Convince Someone When Facts Fail

Me neither. In fact, people seem to double down on their beliefs in the teeth of overwhelming evidence against them. The reason is related to the worldview perceived to be under threat by the conflicting data. Creationists, for example, dispute the evidence for evolution in fossils and DNA because they are concerned about secular forces encroaching on religious faith.

Anti-vaxxers distrust big pharma and think that money corrupts medicine, which leads them to believe that vaccines cause autism despite the inconvenient truth that the one and only study claiming such a link was retracted and its lead author accused of fraud. Six questions that will tell you what media to trust - American Press Institute. Published Updated 10/23/13 11:37 am Tom Rosenstiel The executive director of the American Press Institute is an author, journalist, and media researcher.

Six questions that will tell you what media to trust - American Press Institute

How Data And Information Literacy Could End Fake News. How Academia, Google Scholar And Predatory Publishers Help Feed Academic Fake News. The Fact Checker’s guide for detecting fake news. Consider these points before sharing a news article on Facebook.

The Fact Checker’s guide for detecting fake news

It could be fake. (Monica Akhtar/The Washington Post) Consider these points before sharing a news article on Facebook. It could be fake. Consider these points before sharing an article on Facebook. Anyone active on social media has probably done this at least once: shared something based on the headline without actually reading the link. Let’s face it, you’ve probably done this many times. So the first thing you can do to combat the rise of “fake news” is to actually read articles before sharing them. Determine whether the article is from a legitimate website There’s ABC News, the television network, with the Web address of abcnews.go.com. The use of “.co” at the end of the URL is a strong clue you are looking at a fake news website.

Check the ‘contact us’ page Some fake news sites don’t have any contact information, which easily demonstrates it’s phony. Examine the byline of the reporter and see whether it makes sense true. How To Tell Fake News From Real News In 'Post-Truth' Era. Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability.

Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones.

Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability

Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. If the children are the future, the future might be very ill-informed. That's one implication of a new study from Stanford researchers that evaluated students' ability to assess information sources and described the results as "dismaying," "bleak" and "[a] threat to democracy.

" As content creators and social media platforms grapple with the fake news crisis, the study highlights the other side of the equation: What it looks like when readers are duped. "The photograph had no attribution. Fact-Checking Won’t Save Us From Fake News. Fake news.

Fact-Checking Won’t Save Us From Fake News

We’ve used this phrase so many times in the past two months that it’s almost lost meaning — partly because it can mean so many different things. Depending on who you talk to, “fake news” may refer to satirical news, hoaxes, news that’s clumsily framed or outright wrong, propaganda, lies destined for viral clicks and advertising dollars, politically motivated half-truths, and more. Whatever definition you pick, fake news is worrying media folks. Stories meant to intentionally mislead are an affront to journalism, which is supposed to rely on facts, reality and trust. American Libraries Magazine. Librarians—whether public, school, academic, or special—all seek to ensure that patrons who ask for help get accurate information.

American Libraries Magazine

Given the care that librarians bring to this task, the recent explosion in unverified, unsourced, and sometimes completely untrue news has been discouraging, to say the least. According to the Pew Research Center, a majority of US adults are getting their news in real time from their social media feeds. These are often uncurated spaces in which falsehoods thrive, as revealed during the 2016 election. To take just one example, Pope Francis did not endorse Donald Trump, but thousands of people shared the “news” that he had done so.