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Evaluating Sources in a ‘Post-Truth’ World: Ideas for Teaching and Learning About Fake News

Back in 2015, when we published our lesson plan Fake News vs. Real News: Determining the Reliability of Sources, we had no way of knowing that, a year later, the Oxford Dictionaries would declare “post-truth” the 2016 word of the year; that fake news would play a role in the 2016 presidential election; that it would cause real violence; and that the president-elect of the United States would use the term to condemn mainstream media outlets he opposes. Back then, to convince teachers that the skill was important, we quoted Peter Adams of the News Literacy Project on the “digital naïveté” of the “digital natives” we teach. Now, however, we doubt that we need to convince anyone. These days, invented stories created in a “fake news factory”— or by a 23-year-old in need of cash — go viral, while articles from traditional sources like The Times are called “fake news” by those who see them as hostile to their agenda. As always, we welcome your ideas; please post them in the comments. Mr. Is Mr.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/19/learning/lesson-plans/evaluating-sources-in-a-post-truth-world-ideas-for-teaching-and-learning-about-fake-news.html

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Fake It To Make It I'm so glad you asked! There are a number of good articles on how to identify fake news, including this one from FactCheck.org: How to Spot Fake News. In addition, please: Learning To Spot Fake News: Start With A Gut Check : NPR Ed Which of these statements seems more trustworthy to you? 1) Americans are drowning in a tsunami of ignorance! There is a conspiracy at the highest levels to replace all knowledge with propaganda and disinformation. 2) A recent Stanford University report found that more than 80 percent of middle schoolers didn't understand that the phrase "sponsored content" meant "advertising."

TIP Online Think-Aloud Lessons Talking About Reading As Thinking: Modeling the Hidden Complexities of Online Reading Comprehension* by Julie Coiro, University of Rhode Island Companion website to Coiro, J. (2011). Talking about reading as thinking: Modeling the hidden complexities of online reading comprehension. Theory Into Practice: Themed issue on new and critical perspectives on reading comprehension and strategy instruction, 50(2), 107-115. *This article was awarded the 2012 Frank Pajares Award for Outstanding Theory Into Practice Article at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association in April, 2012. Teacher's guide for planning think-aloud lessons for online reading comprehensionThink-Aloud Lesson TemplateExtended think-aloud model for Lesson 1: (includes guided practice phase)How many individuals of Japanese descent were moved to relocation centers during World War II?

PolitiFact's guide to fake news websites and what they peddle At first look, BostonTribune.com certainly seems a trustworthy source. So does KMT11.com. And ABCNews.com.co. The benefits of a bilingual brain - Mia Nacamulli Amazed by what you have learned about having a bilingual brain? Then, start learning another language now! This website has tons of free lessons, games and quizzes to get you started! Pick one language or even two languages and get that gray matter growing. Artist fools tourists with monument to giant-octopus attack on Staten Island Ferry It’s the city’s secret tragedy: the giant-octopus attack on the Cornelius G. Kolff, a Staten Island Ferry boat dragged to a ­watery grave with 400 souls aboard on Nov. 22, 1963. Few recall the harbor horror because news coverage was eclipsed by the shocking assassination of John F.

4 Strategies to Model Literary Analysis A line from Umberto Eco’s Six Walks in the Fictional Woods, “Every text, after all, is a lazy machine asking the reader to do some of its work,” speaks directly to the beauty and challenge behind teaching literary analysis. Literary analysis is something we must do, not something the text does for us, which is why students must actively learn strategies for it. There are a number of strategies teachers can use to support literary analysis in the classroom. Direct, explicit instruction is one example that can be beneficial to the process. In Explicit Instruction: Effective and Efficient Teaching, Anita Archer and Charles Hughes define explicit instruction as a structured, systematic, and effective approach to teaching skills.

*Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world We were guaranteed a free press, We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state. We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. Note-Taking Apps for Students Taking notes in school can be a big challenge for students with learning and attention issues. They may struggle with writing and organizing their notes while listening. Or they may have trouble keeping up with a teacher because of processing speed issues. These note-taking apps can help. For more options, check out Tech Finder. Price and availability may vary but were accurate at the time of publication, on June 1, 2016.

7 vital browser plugins for newsgathering and verification UPDATE – This article was originally published on Jan 6 2016, but has been updated with the first two tools. Know of any others we may have missed? Let us know on Twitter. When breaking news can travel the world in seconds, it is important for journalists to have the tools at their disposal to get to work fast. When searching the web, what quicker way is there to have those tools available than directly in the browser window? Most browsers have a catalogue of programs and software to make your browsing experience more powerful, like a smartphone app store. Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to assess its level of accuracy, reliability, and bias. In 2012, my colleagues and I assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, and the results definitely got our attention.

The Four Things Students Need to Create Good Book Trailers Creating book trailer videos is a great alternative to a traditional written book report assignment. In a book trailer video students highlight their favorite elements of a story and try to entice viewers to read the book themselves. Much like a movie trailer that tries to get viewers to watch the full movie, a book trailer should give viewers just enough to be interested in the full story without giving away the conclusion to the story. If you have heard of book trailers and wanted to try having your create book trailers, here are the four things they'll need to get started after reading a book. A script/ outline: Before I let students start to assemble a video, I make them write a script or outline for the video.

Now with Video Clips! Meet the New Adobe Spark Video Now with Video Clips! Meet the New Adobe Spark Video Aubrey Cattell | Let’s face it—video was everywhere in 2016. It used to be a cause, a business, a brand was invisible if it didn’t have a website. Now video is the new standard.

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