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The Problem with Fake News (and how our students can solve it)

The Problem with Fake News (and how our students can solve it)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xf8mjbVRqao

Related:  Week 6 Part 1: Media/News/Visual Literacy (*=Key reading)How to Think Critically. Fake NewsCOLLECTION: Media Literacy and Fake NewsCredibility Assessment ToolkitDESINFORMAÇÃO

Critical readers in the (mis)information age Did you know that Chicago was the most dangerous city in the US in 2014? I didn’t. I would have thought it was some bigger city, but according to this set of FBI statistics of total murders, I was wrong. But actually, was I? It’s very easy to look at this graph at face value without digging much further into the narrative it presents. As readers, we absorb this information, particularly when it comes from a perceived authority, but do we question it appropriately? Fact-checking an immigration meme that's been circulating for more than a decade A viral image on social media -- one that’s critical of illegal immigration -- has been circulating for years. The list of claims first circulated in the form of a chain email in 2006, according to Snopes.com. Six years later, we checked several of the claims ourselves. With immigration in the headlines today, these claims are popular again. So we’ll take a fresh look at them here. All told, the list is heavy with claims that are unsupported, misleading, or simply wrong.

UM Library Fake News Course The slides for the LOEX 2018 session entitled Fake News, Lies, and a For-credit Class: Lessons Learned from Teaching a 7-Week Fake News Undergraduate Library Course can be seen on the right. An open Canvas version of the course is available as well. Look for a Canvas version of the course in the Commons if you are a Canvas campus. The assignments in the Canvas Commons course take advantage of the integration of Google Drive and Canvas on our campus. See the assignment materials below if the Canvas assignments are unavailable to you. News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2017 As of August 2017, two-thirds (67%) of Americans report that they get at least some of their news on social media – with two-in-ten doing so often, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center. This is a modest increase since early 2016, when (during the height of the presidential primaries) 62% of U.S. adults reported getting news from social media. While a small increase overall, this growth is driven by more substantial increases among Americans who are older, less educated, and nonwhite. This study is based on a survey conducted August 8-21, 2017, with 4,971 U.S. adults who are members of Pew Research Center’s nationally representative American Trends Panel.

Howard Rheingold: Check Facts With Crap Detection Resources - DML Central Want to know if someone plagiarizes a speech? Is the content on a website copied from another website? Do those song lyrics sound familiar? Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes With Hurricane Sandy approaching the New York metro area, the nation's eyes are turning to its largest city. Photos of storms and flooding are popping up all over Twitter, and while many are real, some of them -- especially the really eye-popping ones -- are fake. This post, which will be updated over the next couple of days, is an effort to sort the real from the unreal. It's a photograph verification service, you might say, or a pictorial investigation bureau. If you see a picture that looks fishy, send it to me at alexis.madrigal[at]gmail.com. If you like this sort of thing, you should also visit istwitterwrong.tumblr.com, which is just cataloging the fakes.

Determining the real from the fake health news - Philly The American Dialect Society voted “fake news” its Word of the Year for 2017, saluting the phrase for its double meanings as “disinformation or falsehoods presented as real news” and “actual news that is claimed to be untrue.” Fake news of either kind is a problem in politics, to be sure. But misleading or erroneous medical news is potentially even worse. It is scary, can lead to poor decisions, and may even hurt the credibility of all health-care providers by making it look as if medicine is not trustworthy. Fake health news can be divided into at least three categories.

News Literacy - High School The universe of information we live in is a complicated web of messages with a mind-blowing array of sources, biases, and agendas. Help your students develop the mad news literacy skills they need with the resources in our hot-off-the-press News Literacy unit. Designed for the high school classroom, this unit teaches students to recognize high-standards journalism so they can make informed judgments about the information coming at them. Students get practical skills to help them identify and deal with misinformation, bias, opinion, and more.

MediaLit Moments Friday, 19 May 2017 11:06 Beth Thornton In the “olden days,” people primarily relied upon newspapers for their news, and the papers were clearly labeled by section -- “News” “Features” “Opinion.” Through everyday use, newspapers trained their readers to expect the international and national news on the front page, and state and local news in following pages, and to flip through the pages for articles about local heroes or topics of interest like Home and Garden, Sports, or their favorite columnists and Editorials. Today, such labels are abandoned when articles are lifted as links and shared via social media, or when people check YouTube for the latest news, or when people accept their friends’ postings as “news.” When you read your news on Facebook (and many people do!)

Information Power The mission of the library media program is to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. This mission is accomplished: by providing intellectual and physical access to materials in all formats by providing instruction to foster competence and stimulate interest in reading, viewing, and using information and ideas by working with other educators to design learning strategies to meet the needs of individual students. --Information Power: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs (1988), p.1 The mission statement for Information Power: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs is as relevant today is it was in 1988, and so it remains the mission statement for the information literacy standards for student learning as well and for Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning. Excerpted from Chapter 1, "The Vision," of Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning.

The End of Reality In a dank corner of the internet, it is possible to find actresses from Game of Thrones or Harry Potter engaged in all manner of sex acts. Or at least to the world the carnal figures look like those actresses, and the faces in the videos are indeed their own. Everything south of the neck, however, belongs to different women. An artificial intelligence has almost seamlessly stitched the familiar visages into pornographic scenes, one face swapped for another. The genre is one of the cruelest, most invasive forms of identity theft invented in the internet era. Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda (URI) This web platform provides an opportunity to explore the subject of contemporary propaganda by hosting thousands of examples of 21st century propaganda from around the world. Users can upload, examine and discuss examples of propaganda from our own daily lives. By examining propaganda, rating its potential impact, and commenting on it, people share their interpretations with others. Lesson plans deepen the learning by offering additional information, structuring discussion activities, and enabling students to demonstrate their learning through multimedia production experiences.

MediaBreaker Critical Remix Tools - The LAMP Break-a-thons are short-term programs with The LAMP, and a perfect introduction for youth about how, why and for whom media are made. Each Break-a-thon focuses on a theme, like the Super Bowl, the MTV Video Music Awards, movie trailers or political advertising; youth then come together for one or two days to break media related to the theme. Participants compete in challenges throughout the event, win prizes and create their very own broken videos talking back to mass media. Past students tell us they never watch TV in quite the same way once they’ve done a Break-a-thon! With Break-a-thon in a Box, you have everything you need to host your own event, including tips, samples, templates and more, all at no cost. Plus, we’re always here to help.

Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world We were guaranteed a free press, We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state. We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make the reliability and credibility decisions. It is up to the reader or viewer to negotiate truth. News literacy is complicated.

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