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The Most Influential Images of All Time. Mashable. Insightful Photos of 1960s Afghanistan Reveal What Life Was Like Before the Taliban. When asked to visualize modern-day Afghanistan, images of a war-torn nation under the control of the Taliban often comes to mind.

Insightful Photos of 1960s Afghanistan Reveal What Life Was Like Before the Taliban

However, there was once a time when this country exuded peace and good fortune. University professor Dr. Bill Podlich captured this phase in history when he travelled to Afghanistan in 1967 with Margaret, his wife, and Jan and Peg, their two teenage daughters. The main reason for their relocation revolved around Dr. Podlich’s desire to become the Expert of Principles of Education at the Higher Teachers College of Kabul. What Dr. “When I look at my dad’s photos, I remember Afghanistan as a country with thousands of years of history and culture,” Dr. Via [Bored Panda, The Daily Mail, Denver Post] All images via Dr. Ziegfeld Follies Beauties of the 1920s (26 photos)

Circus and Carnival

Portraits of famous people. 1911: The British royal family visited India and hunted tigers. Editor's note: This article contains photographs of dead animals.

1911: The British royal family visited India and hunted tigers

Some readers may find the images disturbing. In 1910, King Edward VII died, and his son George V ascended to the throne. He and Queen Mary were coronated at Westminster Abbey on June 22, 1911. Five months later, the royal couple travelled to India to attend the Delhi Durbar, a ceremony proclaiming them emperor and empress of India. 100-Year-Old Color Photos from the Russian Empire.

‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’: Ken Russell’s nearly lost photographs of London’s teenage girl gangs. ‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’: Ken Russell’s nearly lost photographs of London’s teenage girl gangs Though Ken Russell wanted to be a ballet dancer, his father wouldn’t hear of it—no son of his would ever be seen in tights—so the young Russell turned his attention to photography, a craft he thought he could make his name with.

‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’: Ken Russell’s nearly lost photographs of London’s teenage girl gangs

He attended Walthamstow Technical College in London, where he was taught all about lighting and composition. See What a Crowded Coney Island Beach Looked Like in 1902. Whether it's 2015 or 1902, nothing says summer like a crowded beach.

See What a Crowded Coney Island Beach Looked Like in 1902

This early 20th century photograph from the Detroit Photographic Company, titled “On the beach at Coney Island,” shows in gorgeous photochrom color what the beaches of New York looked like way back when. Photochrom pictures aren’t technically color photographs, but rather colorized images made from black-and-white negatives that have been transferred onto lithographic printing plates. The process creates vibrant colors that live somewhere between real life and a hypercolor dream world. The beachgoers in the shot might be a bit more covered up than their modern-day counterparts, but it’s nice to see that in many other ways, not much has changed at all.

[h/t Cool Old Photos] Click to enlarge.

Europe 1900-1930

1911: The British royal family visited India and hunted tigers. Rare color photos of the men who fought World War I. In 1917, World War I was dragging into its fourth bloody year.

Rare color photos of the men who fought World War I

On the Western Front, mechanized warfare and a tactical stalemate had claimed millions of lives. In January, a German telegram urging Mexico to go to war against the United States was intercepted, leading to the Americans’ entry into the conflict. Young, Black and Victorian: Wonderful photographs of Victorian women of color. Google+ Young, Black and Victorian: Wonderful photographs of Victorian women of color 03.09.2015 02:29 pmTopics:HistoryRaceTags:Victorian Here are some photographs of Victorian women of color that date from 1860 to 1901.

Young, Black and Victorian: Wonderful photographs of Victorian women of color

Unfortunately, a lot of these photographs have no names attached to the women posed in the photographs. I’d love to know the stories behind each photo. According to the website Downtown LA Life: Photos of Women of Color from this era are hard to come by, especially “family” photographs. ~ A couple of these photos were taken when there was still slavery in the United States. Aida Overton Walker Studio portrait of an African American woman equestrian rider from the late 1880s. via Downtown LA Life, Pinterest and Bea Tonner on Tumblr. Rare hand-colored photos of Japanese samurai in the late 1800s. The military-nobility caste known as samurai — roughly meaning “those who serve” — emerged in medieval Japan as provincial warriors, and rose to control the country in the 12th century.

Rare hand-colored photos of Japanese samurai in the late 1800s

As the enforcement arm of the ruling shogunate, the samurai were elevated to a position of privilege. Samurai followed a code of honor called bushido, informed by Confucianism and Zen Buddhism. Bushido emphasized martial fearlessness, discipline and loyalty, as well as general kindness. These photos, made in the years after Japan finally opened its ports to international trade, capture samurai in their final days. Colourful London in the 1970s (11 photos) The Nuba: Early Color Work. Marianne Breslauer’s gorgeous photos of queer, androgynous and butch women of the 1930s.

Marianne Breslauer’s gorgeous photos of queer, androgynous and butch women of the 1930s The photography of Marianne Breslauer is striking for both its intimacy and its subjects—women, usually of the sleek, chic and gender-bending variety, posed to optimum androgynous elegance.

Marianne Breslauer’s gorgeous photos of queer, androgynous and butch women of the 1930s

A bohemian Berliner by birth, Breslauer studied under Man Ray for a time in Paris and achieved some commercial success before returning home to an increasingly volatile Germany. As a Jewish artist working in an obviously queer milieu, Breslauer eventually fled to Switzerland and retired from photography early, eventually marrying a man and becoming an art dealer. Among the many beautiful faces captured by Breslauer was her dear friend, Swiss writer, journalist and photographer Annemarie Schwarzenbach, who she described as “neither a man nor a woman, but an angel, an archangel.” Via Messy Nessy. Gorgeous color postcards capture life in 1899 Tunisia. These color postcards of the sun-baked streets and Moorish architecture of Tunisia were created using the Photochrom process, a technique for applying realistic color to monochrome images that predated the spread of practical color photography.

Gorgeous color postcards capture life in 1899 Tunisia

Invented by a Swiss printer in the 1880s, the process began with coating a tablet of lithographic limestone with a light-sensitive emulsion, then exposing it to sunlight under a photo negative for up to several hours. The emulsion would harden in proportion to the tones of the image and the less-hardened portions would be removed with a solvent, leaving a fixed lithographic image on the stone. Following detailed notes on color made by the original photographer, additional litho stones would be prepared for each tint to be used in the final color image — often more than a dozen stones for a single postcard.

When completed, the delicate process produced surprisingly lifelike color with far greater precision than traditional hand-coloring. 33 Stunning Edward Curtis Portraits Of Native Americans. 1 of 34 The Klamath tribes, which also include the the Modocs and the Yahooskin, didn't encounter a white person until 1826, when a fur trapper wandered into their territory.

33 Stunning Edward Curtis Portraits Of Native Americans

Just 28 years later, in 1864, the tribes agreed to cede 23 million acres of their land in exchange for a reservation. In 1954, an act of Congress ended federal recognition of the Klamath tribes, which meant that they lost their reservation and the accompanying human services. Their rights as a federally recognized tribe were not restored until 1986. Spectacular color postcards of Istanbul, er, Constantinople circa 1890 (Retronaut) Striking photos of Bedouin nomads at the turn of the century. Astounding colorized photos reveal the faces and fashions of Ellis Island immigrants. These photographs show a tiny handful of the more than 12 million immigrants who entered the United States through the immigration station at New York's Ellis Island between 1892 and 1954. The men and women portrayed are wearing their finest clothes, often their national dress, brought with them from their homeland to America.

Around 5,000 immigrants entered the country every day at the height of Ellis Island's activity. The photographs were taken by Augustus Francis Sherman, the chief registry clerk at Ellis Island and an avid amateur photographer. They were captioned only with the subject's country of origin. In 1907, the portraits were published in National Geographic. It is estimated that today more than a third of all Americans have an ancestor who came through Ellis Island.

These images have been colorized by Jordan Lloyd of Dynamichrome using extensive historical research to accurately and authentically reproduce the colors of each immigrant's distinctive and proud national fashions. Spectacular color postcards of the castles and moors of 1890 Scotland. Color portraits of immigrants at Ellis Island – in pictures. Photographs of the ‘supreme Beatnik chick’ who inspired Patti Smith (NSFW) In the early 1950s, a young Dutch photographer Ed van der Elsken arrived in Paris to begin his career as a photographer. By day he worked for Magnum, by night—inspired by Weegee’s photographs in Picture Post—Van der Elsken documented the emerging underground youth culture of the city’s Left Bank. In 1954, Van der Elsken compiled a volume of photographs Love on the Left Bank that followed a young Beatnik girl “Ann” through the gangs of bohemians, musicians and vagabonds who hung around the bars, clubs and flophouses of St Germain-des-Prés.

Ann was in fact “played” by Vali Myers—an Australian artist, model, muse and associate of Jean Cocteau and Jean Genet, who Patti Smith later recalled as: ...the supreme beatnik chick—thick red hair and big black eyes, black boatneck sweaters and trench coats. They dine on half a loaf, smoke hashish, sleep in parked cars or on benches under the plane trees, sometimes borrowing a hotel room from a luckier friend to shelter their love. Spectacular color postcards of Istanbul, er, Constantinople circa 1890 (Retronaut) The Very First Color Photographs of the United States. You're looking at some of the very first color photographs of North America! A fascinating new photography book called An American Odyssey opens the archive of the Detroit Photographic Company to reveal America in brilliant color from the late 1880s to the early 1920s.

Several thousand black-and-white negatives were reproduced in color by a photolithographic technique invented in Switzerland, called the Photochrom process. Spectacular hand-colored postcards of 19th-century Venice. These postcards of Belle Époque Venice were printed by the Detroit Publishing Company using the Photochrom process, a time-consuming and exacting technique by which convincing layers of artificial color are applied to black and white photos and reproduced.

Invented in the 1880s by Hans Jakob Schmid, an employee of a Swiss printing company, the closely guarded process begins with coating a tablet of lithographic limestone with a light-sensitive emulsion, then exposing it to sunlight under a photo negative for up to several hours. The emulsion hardens in proportion to the level of exposure and the less hardened portions are removed with a solvent, forming a fixed lithographic image on the stone.

Successive litho stones are then prepared for each individual tint to be used in the final color image. A single Photochrom postcard might require over a dozen different tint stones. 1890 in glorious colour: the magic of photochromes – in pictures. 1865: Haunting portraits of the Lincoln assassination conspirators.