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Europe 1900-1930

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Photos Taken 100 Years Ago Capture Rare Look at Paris in Color. Kahn commissioned four photographers to collect images set specifically in cosmopolitan Paris: Leon Gimpel, Stephane Passet, Georges Chevalier, and Auguste Leon.

Photos Taken 100 Years Ago Capture Rare Look at Paris in Color

They utilized pioneering technology that employed colour filters made from microscopic grains of dyed potato starch. The artists began documenting the city in 1914, just days before the outbreak of World War I. The images collected portray the everyday struggle of real life, juxtaposed with a joie de vivre characteristic of Parisians, in a city on the brink of devastation brought on by a war that would alter the world. This collection showcases an amazing, colourful time period, with historical scenes that are as familiar as they are foreign, not to mention a nostalgic depiction of humanity. via: [PetaPixel] See Venice in Beautiful Color Images 125 Years Ago: The Rialto Bridge, St. Mark's Basilica, Doge's Palace & More. A few months ago, Mental Floss put up a post of “Fantastic 120-Year-Old Color Pictures of Ireland.”

See Venice in Beautiful Color Images 125 Years Ago: The Rialto Bridge, St. Mark's Basilica, Doge's Palace & More

Fantastic pictures indeed, although the nature of the technology that produced them seems as interesting to me as the 19th-century Irish life captured in the images themselves. They came from the Library of Congress’ geographically organized archive of photocrom prints, a method perhaps known only to die-hard historical photography enthusiasts. For the rest of us, the Library of Congress’ page on the photocrom process explains it: “Photochrom prints are ink-based images produced through ‘the direct photographic transfer of an original negative onto litho and chromographic printing plates.'”

Idyllic color photos of Ireland in 1927. Dreamlike color photos capture English beaches at the turn of the century. Rare color photos of 1928 England, full of soul and spunk. In the late 1920s and early 1930s National Geographic sent photographer Clifton R.

Rare color photos of 1928 England, full of soul and spunk

Vivid color photos of 1923 Paris, hub of artistry and progress. Jules Gervais-Courtellemont was born in 1863 outside Paris, in the province of Seine-et-Marne, but grew up mostly in Algeria.

Vivid color photos of 1923 Paris, hub of artistry and progress

A restless traveler and seeker of exotic sights, he roamed throughout the Middle East and north Africa, from Morocco to Turkey. He even traveled as far as India and China, photographing as he went. In 1894, he converted to Islam, and soon thereafter made the pilgrimage to Mecca. Beautiful color photographs of England during the 1920s. The summers seemed brighter, the weather warmer, the days more leisurely.

Beautiful color photographs of England during the 1920s

The First World War—”the war to end all wars”—was over and the 1920s began as a decade of great prosperity. But by 1925 the years of plenty ceased. The gap between rich and poor widened, with unemployment rife and beggars—many old soldiers—a common sight on the cities’ streets. In 1926, a General Strike almost brought down the government when unions showed solidarity with one million mine workers who had been locked out of the mines by owners who wanted them to work more hours for less pay—a drop of 13% of the miners’ wages. Where farming had once thrived, one in four farms were sold during the 1920s to pay to financial obligations—over 600,000 farmers went bankrupt. Families were of a smaller size compared to Victorian families—with children educated until the age of fourteen. In 1928, photographer Clifton R. Via Retronaut. Rare color photos of 1928 England, full of soul and spunk. In the late 1920s and early 1930s National Geographic sent photographer Clifton R.

Rare color photos of 1928 England, full of soul and spunk

Adams to England to record its farms, towns and cities, and its people at work and play. 1907-1915: Russia Before the Revolution, in Color. Turn-of-the-Century Germany in Color Photographs. Instant color film didn’t come about until the 1960s, but long before that, crafty photographers found ways to inject a few more hues into their images.

Turn-of-the-Century Germany in Color Photographs

One of these early techniques was called the Photochrom process, invented by Swiss lithographer Hans Jakob Schmid as a way to mass-produce color images from black-and-white negatives. The first images created using Photochrom were presented at the 1889 World’s Fair in Paris. Popular in the U.S. and Europe from the mid-1890s up to 1914, Photochrom postcards were often sold at resorts and hotels. Around the same time, the German Empire, at that time ruled by Kaiser Wilhelm II, was experiencing a boon in travel.

In addition to the standard modes such as trains, trams, and steamers, driving and flying were in their nascent stages, and many average citizens could afford to travel for pleasure, purchasing postcards to remember their trip. Germany around 1900: A Portrait in Colour will be available from TASCHEN ($200) in December. Gorgeous color photographs of Paris from over a century ago. In 1909, millionaire banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn traveled to Japan on business.

Gorgeous color photographs of Paris from over a century ago

He was accompanied by his chauffeur and the photographer Alfred Dutertre, who he commissioned as his own personal Instagram to document his travels. Upon his return to his home in Paris, Kahn looked through the dozens of photos Duterte had snapped and decided he wanted to create “a photographic record of the entire Earth.”