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Genealogy

Being Defensive. Life is short. Death. Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Maslow's hierarchy of needs, represented as a pyramid with the more basic needs at the bottom[1] Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review.[2] Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs

His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow used the terms "physiological", "safety", "belongingness" and "love", "esteem", "self-actualization", and "self-transcendence" to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through. Maslow's theory was fully expressed in his 1954 book Motivation and Personality.[5] The hierarchy remains a very popular framework in sociology research, management training[6] and secondary and higher psychology instruction.

Hierarchy Physiological needs Safety needs Safety and Security needs include: Joseph Campbell. Joseph John Campbell (March 26, 1904 – October 30, 1987) was an American mythologist, writer and lecturer, best known for his work in comparative mythology and comparative religion.

Joseph Campbell

His work is vast, covering many aspects of the human experience. His philosophy is often summarized by his phrase: "Follow your bliss. "[1] Life[edit] Background[edit] Joseph Campbell was born and raised in White Plains, New York[2] in an upper-middle-class Irish Catholic family. While at Dartmouth College he studied biology and mathematics, but decided that he preferred the humanities.

Europe[edit] What makes a hero? - Matthew Winkler. Human body. The Star In You. By Peter Tyson Posted 12.02.10 NOVA scienceNOW "Our planet, our society, and we ourselves are built of star stuff.

The Star In You

"—Carl Sagan, Cosmos. Scale of Universe - Interactive Scale of the Universe Tool. The Most Astounding Fact - Neil deGrasse Tyson. Profile on TED.com.

Health

Human Anatomy and Conditions in Interactive 3D. 100 Very Cool Facts About The Human Body – Global One TV: Multimedia for Mystics. The Brain The human brain is the most complex and least understood part of the human anatomy.

100 Very Cool Facts About The Human Body – Global One TV: Multimedia for Mystics

There may be a lot we don’t know, but here are a few interesting facts that we’ve got covered. Nerve impulses to and from the brain travel as fast as 170 miles per hour. Ever wonder how you can react so fast to things around you or why that stubbed toe hurts right away? Human Genome Project Information. Completed in 2003, the Human Genome Project (HGP) was a 13-year project coordinated by the U.S.

Human Genome Project Information

Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institutes of Health. During the early years of the HGP, the Wellcome Trust (U.K.) became a major partner; additional contributions came from Japan, France, Germany, China, and others. Project goals were to identify all the approximately 20,500 genes in human DNA,determine the sequences of the 3 billion chemical base pairs that make up human DNA,store this information in databases,improve tools for data analysis,transfer related technologies to the private sector, andaddress the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) that may arise from the project. Genetics Overview - Science Behind the Genographic Project - National Geographic.

The Human Body The human body is made of some 50 trillion to 100 trillion cells, which form the basic units of life and combine to form more complex tissues and organs.

Genetics Overview - Science Behind the Genographic Project - National Geographic

Inside each cell, genes make up a “blueprint” for protein production that determines how the cell will function. Genes also determine physical characteristics or traits. The complete set of some 20,000 to 25,000 genes is called the genome. Only a tiny fraction of the total genome sets the human body apart from those of other animals.

Intellect

Psychology Tests & Surveys. Determinism. Determinism is the philosophical position that for every event, including human action, there exist conditions that could cause no other event.

Determinism

"There are many determinisms, depending upon what pre-conditions are considered to be determinative of an event. Free will. Though it is a commonly held intuition that we have free will,[3] it has been widely debated throughout history not only whether that is true, but even how to define the concept of free will.[4] How exactly must the will be free, what exactly must the will be free from, in order for us to have free will?

Free will

Viktor Frankl. Viktor Emil Frankl, M.D., Ph.D. (26 March 1905 – 2 September 1997)[1][2] was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor.

Viktor Frankl

Individualism. Individualism makes the individual its focus[1] and so starts "with the fundamental premise that the human individual is of primary importance in the struggle for liberation.

Individualism

"[4] Liberalism, existentialism and anarchism are examples of movements that take the human individual as a central unit of analysis.[4] Individualism thus involves "the right of the individual to freedom and self-realization".[5] Myth of self. Extreme individualism rebels against nature’s design of the human being. The Myth of Individualism. Peter Callero. J. A. Howard and P. L. Callero (Eds.). The Self-Society Dynamic: Cognition, Emotion and Action.

The Unicist Research Institute. Why Not Apologizing Makes You Feel Better. Illustration by NPR To err is human. So is refusing to apologize for those errors. From toddlers and talk show hosts to preteens and presidents, we all know people who have done stupid, silly and evil things, then squared their jaws and told the world they've done nothing wrong. Parents, educators and even public relations flacks have talked at length about the value of coming clean, and there is abundant research on the psychological value of apologizing. But psychologists recently decided to take a new tack: If so many people don't like to do it, there must be psychological value in not apologizing, too. In a recent paper, researchers Tyler G. Sigmund Freud Biography. Profile on TED.com. Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain: Antonio Damasio: 9780307474957: Amazon.com. Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain - Antonio Damasio. Medicine. Medicine (also called conventional, orthodox, scientific, or mainstream medicine, especially in connection with alternative medicine, UK English i/ˈmɛdsɨn/, US English The word medicine is derived from the Latin ars medicina, meaning the art of healing.[3][4] Clinical practice[edit] The components of the medical interview[5] and encounter are: The clinical examination involves the study of: It is to likely focus on areas of interest highlighted in the medical history and may not include everything listed above.

Medical laboratory and imaging studies results may be obtained, if necessary. Culture. Culture (Latin: cultura, lit. "cultivation"[1]) is a modern concept based on a term first used in classical antiquity by the Roman orator Cicero: "cultura animi" (cultivation of the soul). This non-agricultural use of the term "culture" re-appeared in modern Europe in the 17th century referring to the betterment or refinement of individuals, especially through education. During the 18th and 19th century it came to refer more frequently to the common reference points of whole peoples, and discussion of the term was often connected to national aspirations or ideals. Some scientists such as Edward Tylor used the term "culture" to refer to a universal human capacity.

In the 20th century, "culture" emerged as a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of human phenomena that cannot be directly attributed to genetic inheritance. Etymology[edit] Society. A society , or a human society , is a group of people related to each other through persistent relations, or a large social grouping sharing the same geographical or virtual territory, subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Human societies are characterized by patterns of relationships ( social relations ) between individuals who share a distinctive culture and institutions ; a given society may be described as the sum total of such relationships among its constituent members.

How to Win Friends & Influence People: Dale Carnegie: 9780671723651: Amazon.com. How to Win Friends & Influence People. Curiosity. Curious children gather around photographer Toni Frissell, looking at her camera.

Autobiographical self

Core self. Proto self.