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How young children learn english

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Heuristic play. Heuristic play is rooted in young children’s natural curiosity.

Heuristic play

As babies grow, they move beyond being content to simply feel and ponder objects, to wanting to find out what can be done with them. Toddlers have an urge to handle things: to gather, fill, dump, stack, knock down, select and manipulate in other ways. Household or kitchen utensils offer this kind of activity as every parent knows, and can occupy a child for surprising stretches of time. When toddlers make an enjoyable discovery – for instance when one item fits into another, or an interesting sound is produced – they often repeat the action several times to test the result, which strengthens cognitive development as well as fine muscle control and hand/eye coordination.

In their book, People under Three, Elinor Goldschmied and Sonia Jackson coined the term heuristic play, to explain how to provide a more structured opportunity for this kind of activity. Page from English in Early Childhood - British Council. Development Matters FINAL PRINT AMENDED. How Children Learn to Talk. Have you ever wondered how children learn to talk?

How Children Learn to Talk

Many people, when asked that question, respond that they do it by imitating. This is at least partially true. Without imitation, we couldn't account for the fact that children in Texas usually learn Texan English, children in Paris usually learn Parisian French, and not vice versa. But imitation as an answer doesn't take us very far. For one thing, children routinely say things they've never heard: "Mommy, come quick—Waldo swallowed a frog! " At this point some would amend their position to say that children don't imitate others sentence by sentence. At any given point in development, a child's speech more closely resembles the speech of other children at the same stage of development than it does the speech of adults in the child's environment—even if there are not other children around. A few more myths about speakers of multiple languages. Does multilingualism cause language delays and identity problems?

A few more myths about speakers of multiple languages

The British Council's Nayr Ibrahim busts a few more myths about speakers of multiple languages. Myth: Multilingualism causes language delay Raising children bilingually is sometimes believed to cause language delay. This misconception is based on a separate underlying proficiency (SUP) hypothesis. This theory, now discredited, suggests that languages are stored in separate compartments or containers, which represent half the capacity of the monolingual brain.

Decades of research into bi- and multilingualism has shown that there is no causal relationship between bilingualism and language delay. Does being bilingual make you smarter? Language teacher and researcher Miguel Angel Muñoz explains the latest research on how being bilingual affects your brain, ahead of a British Council seminar in Cardiff on whether learning a foreign language makes you smarter.

Does being bilingual make you smarter?

You can watch the live-streamed seminar Opens in a new tab or window. on Tuesday, 3 June. More than half the world's population uses two or more languages every day It is hard to estimate the exact number of bilingual people in the world, as there is a lack of reliable statistics Opens in a new tab or window.. But in 2012, a Eurobarometer survey Opens in a new tab or window. established that 'just over half of Europeans (54%)' are bilingual, and other studies Opens in a new tab or window. hypothesise that more than half of the world’s population is bilingual.

So what about you? Being bilingual isn't black-and-white. What Parents Can Gain From Learning the Science of Talking to Kids. The widening education gap between the rich and the poor is not news to those who work in education, many of whom have been struggling to close the gap beginning the day poor children enter kindergarten or preschool.

What Parents Can Gain From Learning the Science of Talking to Kids

But one unlikely soldier has joined the fight: a pediatric surgeon who wants to get started way before kindergarten. She wants to start closing the gap the day babies are born. When Dr. Dana Suskind began doing cochlear implants on infants at the University of Chicago—a cutting-edge surgical technique that allows once-deaf babies to hear—in her follow-ups with families she noticed a stark difference in how the now-hearing children acquired language. Once they could hear, some children’s language skills thrived and grew, while others languished. The difference turned out to be the words children heard from their parents and caregivers, millions of them. For Suskind, a lightbulb went on. Bringing Parents On Board Of course, some words are more powerful than others. . * Tune In. Patricia Kuhl: The linguistic genius of babies.

Alison Gopnik: What do babies think? How young children learn English as another language. By Opal Dunn, educational consultant and author Introduction Young children are natural language acquirers; they are self-motivated to pick up language without conscious learning, unlike adolescents and adults.

How young children learn English as another language

They have the ability to imitate pronunciation and work out the rules for themselves. Any idea that learning to talk in English is difficult does not occur to them unless it’s suggested by adults, who themselves probably learned English academically at a later age through grammar-based text books. Read the notes below about young children learning English as another language. The advantages of beginning early.