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Page from English in Early Childhood - British Council

Page from English in Early Childhood - British Council

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/english-in-early-childhood/1/register

Related:  ENGLISH IN EARLY CHILDHOODjuliaredroseHow young children learn englishmiser_kimvn

The Gardener and the Carpenter “Bracing and thoughtful . . . Educators looking to resist the current vogue for highly scripted, teacher-driven lesson modules will be delighted by Gopnik’s strong scientific case for letting children guide their own learning . . . Gopnik shines when she describes the intricate world of children’s play . . . She also has a subtle grasp of policy problems bedeviling young children and their families . . . Gopnik never veers from her faith in the warm human bond between caregiver and child that drives not only 'the pathos, but also the moral depth' of being a parent. This lovely book, and the life’s work that animates it, will only deepen that bond, helping our children to flourish.” Teaching Ideas Join our email newsletter to receive free updates! Close Search for Ideas and Resources

Early Childhood Care and Education UNESCO’s activities in ECCE focus on influencing policies and practices through evidence-based advocacy, knowledge generation and sharing, capacity-building and technical assistance. These include work in specific areas such as teachers, monitoring and integration. UNESCO collaborates with government officials and other key stakeholders concerned with the care and education of young children aged 0-8. As this age bracket covers children in various developmental stages, it is naturally difficult for countries to address all children within this group simultaneously and equally. Prioritization is necessary.

Key Person & Attachment The Key Person Children thrive from a base of loving and secure relationships. This is normally provided by a child’s parents but it can also be provided by a key person. A key person is a named member of staff with responsibilities for a small group of children who helps those children in the group feel safe and cared for. Can we learn a second language like we learned our first? Robert William McCaul, winner (with Marek Kiczkowiak) of the TeachingEnglish blog award, examines the influential ideas of linguist Stephen Krashen, and the implications they have for the language classroom. If you've ever doubted whether you're a good language learner, then bear in mind that you've already learned one language very well indeed – your first. But this raises an interesting question: can adults learn a second language in the same way they learned their first as children? And if so, what are the implications for the classroom? Stephen Krashen and the acquisition of languages

Blog – Speech in Action There is one major prerequisite for becoming an effective user of a language. (Being a prerequisite means that it is an essential requirement before you can start doing anything meaningful.) This prerequisite is ‘substance mastery’. By this I mean mastery of the substances of both writing and speech, the ability to form (in writing and speaking), and to perceive (in reading and listening) the words that you and other people write or say. Substance mastery is that essential something which precedes the tasks of sharing and understanding meanings

About ATD Education Our Mission For more than 70 years, ATD Education’s mission has been to empower talent development professionals with the knowledge and skills they need to be successful and remain competitive. We offer cutting-edge learning and professional development programs to bring you the latest research in the field, best practices, expert-vetted content, and tools you can immediately use on the job. Each learning experience prepares you to maximize the efficiency of your systems and processes, while supporting and developing your people.

Whole Child Development Is Undervalued Child development should inspire lifelong learning across different spaces and communities. Research suggests that "whole child development," not routine or standardized classroom-based learning, empowers children as creative and engaged citizens who can strengthen the wellbeing of a whole society. It is crucial, then, to nurture their creative abilities to express themselves, understand others, and navigate complex amounts of information so that they can confidently solve the problems of a world that's changing faster than ever. The question is how to make such an approach both systemic and sustainable.

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