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Rewire the web. What Is Differentiated Instruction? Click the "References" link above to hide these references. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997). Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life. New York: Basic Books. Danielson, C. (1996). Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching. Sternberg, R. Tomlinson, C. (1995). Tomlinson, C. (1999). Vygotsky, L. (1986). Winebrenner, S. (1992). The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction. My colleague Katie Hull-Sypnieski is leading a February 1st Education Week Webinar on differentiating instruction, and I would strongly encourage people to participate.

Katie’s the best teacher I’ve ever seen…. In addition, Katie and I have co-authored a piece for Education Week Teacher on the topic that will be appearing there soon (it’s appeared: The Five By Five Approach To Differentiation Success), and an upcoming post in my blog there will be talking about it, too (that two part series has also appeared). I also did a second two-part series in Ed Week on differentiation. Also, check out The Best “Fair Isn’t Equal” Visualizations. Given all that, a “The Best…” post was inevitable, and here it is. Here are my choices for The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction: The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels” Busting Myths about Differentiated Instruction is by Rick Wormeli. Reconcilable Differences? Deciding to Teach Them All is by Carol Ann Tomlinson. Differentiating Instruction. Whether you teach first grade or AP Calculus, your class is certain to have a variety of learners.

Perhaps you have some ESL/ELL students, some learning support, some emotional support, some gifted, and some very “average.” TeachersFirst has resources to help you understand and adapt for student differences, including general ideas for any and all students and for specific student needs. For Any and All Students: Browse examples Many TeachersFirst resource reviews include differentiation suggestions and practical ways a resource can help you meet individual needs. Consider Multiple Intelligences These Multiple Intelligences definitions and examples will help you understand and recognize multiple intelligences so you can plan activities to address student strengths, not just your own. For Specific Student Needs: Autism and Aspergers Find resources and information to help you understand and work with this increasing population.

Gifted. What Is a Differentiated Classroom? Though today's teachers generally work with single classes with students of nearly the same age, these children have an array of needs as great as those among the children of the one-room school. Thus, a teacher's question remains much the same as it was 100 years ago: “How do I divide time, resources, and myself so that I am an effective catalyst for maximizing talent in all my students?”

Consider how these teachers answer that question. Mrs. Wiggins assigns students to spelling lists based on a pretest, not the assumption that all 3rd graders should work on List Three. Mr. All of these teachers are differentiating instruction. Hallmarks of Differentiated Classrooms In differentiated classrooms, teachers begin where students are, not the front of a curriculum guide. In differentiated classrooms, teachers provide specific ways for each individual to learn as deeply as possible and as quickly as possible, without assuming one student's road map for learning is identical to anyone else's. TSG_Diff_Elem_Sample. The How's, Why's and Value of Educational Technology. Educational Technology - it's a term that technically can mean anything from a pen or overhead to laptops and interactive web 2.0 technologies.

Some schools and teachers use a lot of technology with their classes, some use very little. Some schools and teachers use technology very well and others don't. Some use it to do things differently and some use it to do different things. Let's explore how, why and the value of educational technology. There is a lot of technology out there to use. With the huge amount of hardware, software, and web apps, an educator has a lot to sort through. The lesson objectives always come first.

I do a lot of projects. Technology is also a great communication tool. Technology can also be used to differentiate teaching and learning. I have also used technology for backup plans, to communicate lessons when I'm absent, and to save my back. Backup plans are extremely important as a teacher. I have a serious back injury from working as a Paramedic. Faculty Conversation: Carol Tomlinson on Differentiation » Articles » Curry School of Education. In education circles, Carol Ann Tomlinson is known as the guru of differentiation.

Her research-based work is in such high demand that she has made more than 700 presentations and keynote addresses to school districts and professional associations across the country and abroad since joining the Curry School in 1991. She has authored 17 books on the topics of differentiated instruction and curriculum, some of which have been translated into twelve languages. In this Curry conversation, Tomlinson offers her take on what makes differentiation so important for students. Carol Tomlinson What is the essence of differentiation? Tomlinson: Differentiation is an instructional approach to help teachers teach with individuals as well as content in mind. Differentiation really means trying to make sure that teaching and learning work for the full range of students, which really should be our goal as teachers. What empirical evidence exists for the effectiveness of differentiation?

Pre-Assessment. 10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds. Good assessment is frequent assessment. Any assessment is designed to provide a snapshot of student understand—the more snapshots, the more complete the full picture of knowledge. On its best day, an assessment will be 100% effective, telling you exactly what a student understands. More commonly, the return will be significantly lower as the wording of questions, the student’s sense of self-efficacy, or other factors diminish their assessment performance. It sounds obvious, but a student is a human being with an entire universe of personal problems, distraction, and related challenges in recalling the information in the form the assessment demands. This makes a strong argument for frequent assessment, as it can be too easy to over-react and “remediate” students who may be banging against the limits of the assessment’s design rather than their own understanding.

Simple Assessments The word “simple” here is misleading. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Draw what you do understand. 10. The 5 Minute Marking Plan by @TeacherToolkit and @LeadingLearner #5MinPlan. Marking is an occupational hazard for all teachers. Whilst ‘The 5 Minute Marking Plan’ cannot do your marking for you (sadly) it will help you focus on the job in hand and help ensure you maximise your students’ learning and your own. Written by @LeadingLearner – Stephen Tierney. Download on TES Resources: Click to download the template This planner adds to a growing number of 5 Minute Plans, including: The thinking that underpins the plan: …seeks to highlight those elements of marking that have greatest impact on learning, namely: Sharing the key marking points (you may refer to these as success criteria).

The time spent on marking students’ work must also help you identify common errors, so you can: Require students to correct and improve their work.Re-teach elements of the lesson, scheme of work, programme of study or syllabus to help close key gaps in students’ knowledge, understanding or skills.Inform future teaching programmes. ‘The 5 Minute Marking Plan’ Context: What each section means? Differentiate-with-Technology - home. Udltechtoolkit - home. Using Technology to Differentiate Instruction - TheApple.com. Resources >> Browse Articles >> Utilizing Technology Featured Author: Mrs. Kelly Tenkely Kelly Tenkely is a technology teacher in a private school.

Kelly also trains teaching staff on integrating and implementing technology into the classroom. One of the major benefits of using technology in the classroom is the ability to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of every student in every lesson. Below you will find website suggestions that address the different learning styles in your classroom with the help of technology: Verbal-Linguistic These learners enjoy learning through speaking, writing, reading, and listening.

Websites to encourage learning for Verbal-Linguistic students: 1. Allow students to express themselves creatively with words 2. Capture student voices with audio, text, pictures, and video 3. A free online word processor, and presentation tool 4. Students can podcast (voice recording) online. Nets-s-standards.pdf. Differentiating Using 21st Century Tools - Mahara.

Digital Differentiation. Technology is a tool that can be used to help teachers facilitate learning experiences that address the diverse learning needs of all students and help them develop 21st Century Skills. At it's most basic level, digital tools can be used to help students find, understand and use information. When combined with student-driven learning experiences fueled by Essential Questions offering flexible learning paths, it can be the ticket to success. Here is a closer look at three components of effectively using technology as a tool for digital differentiation. Note: The interactive graphics you see below have been updated.

The goal is to design student-driven learning experiences that are fueled by standards-based Essential Questions and facilitated by digital tools to provide students with flexible learning paths. Essential Questions: Student-driven learning experiences should be driven by standards-based Essential Questions. Teacher Facilitated Learning Experiences:

What Works for Differentiating Instruction in Elementary Schools. Customizing your teaching to suit each child makes eminent sense. Kids are different, they learn differently, so we should teach them differently, right? But when you're staring out at 20 or 30 students as individual as snowflakes, you may find yourself asking that ever-daunting question: "How? " The short answer is: one step at a time. Teachers at Forest Lake Elementary School in Columbia, South Carolina, have made it their mission for the past decade to differentiate instruction for their diverse students. They started small, and they've grown and honed their strategies each year. Here are their tips -- combined with some advice from Edutopia bloggers and members of the Edutopia community -- on how you can get started.

And please use the comments field below to ask questions and add your own suggestions! In 5 minutes you can Read students' files. In 5 days you can Arrange desks into collaborative clusters or stations. In 5 weeks you can Make a scaffolding toolkit. In 5 months you can. Tools for Differentiation / FrontPage. Differentiation - tools, tips and resources. Differentiation is an important aspect of education. Students learn differently, have different needs, different backgrounds, different skills, different ability levels, different interests and more. As educators, we try to create engaging lesson activities that provide a variety of learning experiences and allow students to demonstrate their learning in different ways. Differentiation should occur in both how students learn and gain knowledge and skills, and in how they demonstrate and are assessed on what they have learned.

“In the practice of education, differentiation is defined as working to address the abilities, interests, and needs (both perceived and real) of individuals. Differentiation provides students with opportunities to approach curriculum from their strengths, as varied as these might be.” (Sondergeld and Schultz, 2008). Here are some resources, tips, and tools on differentiation: Digital Differentiation - ideas and tools for differentiating with digital resources. Tips & Strategies for Effective Differentiation & Instruction.wmv. Tomlinson - Differentiation Central.

Ways To Differentiate Instruction - Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo. (This is the first post in a two-part series on differentiation) I posed this question last week: "What is the best advice you can give to a teacher about differentiating instruction? " I've shared my response in an Ed Week Teacher article that I've co-authored with my colleague, Katie Hull Sypnieski. It's titled "The Five By Five Approach To Differentiation Success. " I'll limit my contribution here to sharing a useful link to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

Experts in the field, though, have agreed to share their responses here, so today I'm pleased to publish answers from Carol Tomlinson and Rick Wormeli. Response From Carol Tomlinson Carol Tomlinson is an internationally-recognized leader and author in the field of differentiated instruction. My journey with differentiation began in my middle school classroom when it was quite clear that my one-size-fits-all approach to teaching was, in fact, not fitting many of my students. There were many more questions, of course. Daretodifferentiate - home. The Differentiator. Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator The Differentiator is based on Bloom's Taxonomy, Kaplan and Gould's Depth and Complexity, and David Chung's product menu. Try It In: French Dutch • Tweet It • Like Byrdseed • Pin It Students will judge the ethics of the [click to edit] using a textbook and create an essay in groups of three.

Revised Bloom's Taxonomy adapted from "A Taxonomy for Learning,Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives" by Anderson and Krathwohl Depth and Complexity adapted from The Flip Book by Sandra N. Depth Big Idea Unanswered Questions Ethics Patterns Rules Language of the Discipline Essential Details Trends Complexity Multiple Points Of View Change Over Time Across the Disciplines Imperatives Origin Convergence Parallels Paradox Contribution Key Words Consequences Motivations Implications Significance Adapted from David Chung and The Flip Book, Too by Sandra N.

Group Size One Two Three Four. Marzano's Instructional Strategies. Choice Boards. Differentiation for High Ability Learners. Differentiation - tools, tips and resources.