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From Reconquista to Reconquest

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At times of Reconquista decisions were sought in bloody battles. Nowadays is the armed struggle of secondary importance. Preference is given to very effective ways of enforcing the power in which violence is not practiced openly. Moreover they are far less costly than military interventions.

The subdued level of visible violence belies the true extent of the brutality at which the domination is exerted. In a World where most people are still being excluded from opportunities to better themselves and achieve prosperity, the ordinary people should struggle to reconquest the means needed to overcome the necessity to work for the few. That will then allow them to work for their mutual welfare in freedom.

Anti-Democratic attacks by multilateral Agreements

Disruptive Technologies. Islamic threat, war on terror and the true face of neoliberalism. The subjugation of Greece. Struggle for democratization of the media. Battleground Education. Battleground energy revolution. Battleground Food Supply. Battleground Water Supply. Civil disobedience. We Are One Community: Leading a Global Cooperative for The Highest Good of All. One Community is a 100% volunteer-operated non-profit and non-governmental organization creating open source resources and solutions for all aspects of sustainable and globally regenerative living.

We Are One Community: Leading a Global Cooperative for The Highest Good of All

This page will give you a comprehensive overview of One Community. It also serves as a path to navigate our website. It contains the following sections: One Community is a 100% volunteer-operated non-profit and non-governmental organization. We’ve had between 300 and 400 volunteers contribute to bring the project to where it is now. Everyone who has worked on the project is a volunteer, there’s no monetary compensation offered. Click Here if You’d Like to Join Our Team One Community is creating open source and free-shared resources and solutions for Highest Good food, energy, housing, education, for-profit and non-profit economics design, social architecture, fulfilled living, stewardship practices and more. These pages explain what we are creating from a global-change perspective:

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Think Like a Commoner

Noam Chomsky on the Potential for Ordinary People to Make Radical Change. Noam Chomsky.

Noam Chomsky on the Potential for Ordinary People to Make Radical Change

(Photo: Andrew Rusk) First published at Jacobin magazine, a print and online magazine offering socialist perspectives on politics, economics, and culture. Buddhist Economics: How to Start Prioritizing People Over Products and Creativity Over Consumption. By Maria Popova Much has been said about the difference between money and wealth and how we, as individuals, can make more of the latter, but the divergence between the two is arguably even more important the larger scale of nations and the global economy.

Buddhist Economics: How to Start Prioritizing People Over Products and Creativity Over Consumption

What does it really mean to create wealth for people — for humanity — as opposed to money for governments and corporations? That’s precisely what the influential German-born British economist, statistician, Rhodes Scholar, and economic theorist E. F. Schumacher explores in his seminal 1973 book Small Is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered (public library) — a magnificent collection of essays at the intersection of economics, ethics, and environmental awareness, which earned Schumacher the prestigious Prix Européen de l’Essai Charles Veillon award and was deemed by The Times Literary Supplement one of the 100 most important books published since WWII.

Community-Wealth.org: Wealth-Building Strategies for America's Communities. Democracycollaborative.org. The Rise of Anti-Capitalism. Photo WE are beginning to witness a paradox at the heart of capitalism, one that has propelled it to greatness but is now threatening its future: The inherent dynamism of competitive markets is bringing costs so far down that many goods and services are becoming nearly free, abundant, and no longer subject to market forces.

The Rise of Anti-Capitalism

While economists have always welcomed a reduction in marginal cost, they never anticipated the possibility of a technological revolution that might bring those costs to near zero. The first inkling of the paradox came in 1999 when Napster, the music service, developed a network enabling millions of people to share music without paying the producers and artists, wreaking havoc on the music industry. Similar phenomena went on to severely disrupt the newspaper and book publishing industries. Consumers began sharing their own information and entertainment, via videos, audio and text, nearly free, bypassing the traditional markets altogether. Green Taxi Cooperative: Building an alternative to the corporate "Sharing Economy" The “Sharing Economy” is comprised of corporations like Uber and Airbnb—that don’t actually do much sharing.

Green Taxi Cooperative: Building an alternative to the corporate "Sharing Economy"

But real alternatives that build community and cooperative ownership are under development across the country—like Green Taxi Cooperative, an emerging worker-owned business in Denver, Colorado that just received the regulatory approval they need to launch the 800-driver strong cooperatively-owned and union-organized company. The People’s Uber: Why The Sharing Economy Must Share Ownership.

Mayor Bill de Blasio recently discovered, during his short-lived campaign against Uber, that saying no to a popular, convenient new technology doesn't tend to win many friends—or win much at all.

The People’s Uber: Why The Sharing Economy Must Share Ownership

In just a few years, New York City's regulated yellow-taxi fleet has been outnumbered by a distant company with uncertain intentions. There are benefits to this, as well as mounting costs. But critics like Mr. De Blasio won't get very far until they have something to say yes to.