background preloader

Educator with a Maker Mindset

Facebook Twitter

The Maker Educator Workshop. The Mindset of the Maker Educator. Educator as a Maker Educator. Educators as Lead Learners. I have discussed educators as model learners before: The educator’s role has or should change in this age of information abundance or Education 2.0-3.0.

Educators as Lead Learners

The educator’s role has always been to model and demonstrate effective learning, but somewhere along the line, the major role of the educator became that of content and knowledge disseminator. Now that in this information age content is freely and abundantly available, it is more important than ever to assist learners in the process of how to learn. (Educator as Model Learner) Capture the Learning: Crafting the Maker Mindset. You've heard some good stuff about the maker movement such as how making helps students learn through embodied cognition, creates a mindset that's empowering, and builds creative confidence.

Capture the Learning: Crafting the Maker Mindset

You're interested in crafting some maker lessons but don't know where to start or how to do something that works in your classroom. Or perhaps you're worried that you don't have time to do a long, involved project. How do you still teach the Common Core or cover the required curriculum? Innovation Mindset = Growth + Maker + Team Experiences - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark - 21st century skills, academic mindest, deeper learning, education, Innovation, leadership. What do young people need to know and be able to do be successful?

Innovation Mindset = Growth + Maker + Team Experiences - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark - 21st century skills, academic mindest, deeper learning, education, Innovation, leadership

Sure reading, writing, and problem solving are important to just about every family wage job. Content knowledge gives you something to work with, but what else is important for success in life? It turns out there are a bunch of factors that schools seldom talk about, teach, or provide feedback on that are at least as important as academic skills. What research says. Two traits predict success in life: grit and self-control; that was the conclusion Penn professor Angela Lee Duckworth reached eight years ago.

The Maker Mindset: Albemarle County Public Schools & Maker Corps. By Chad Ratliff and Pam Moran, District Administrators, Albemarle County Public Schools (Charlottesville, VA) A few weeks ago, some of our young people reminded us that “making” is a mindset that can occur any time, any place.

The Maker Mindset: Albemarle County Public Schools & Maker Corps

During a snow day, a group of kids were co-opted by a local teenage video “maker” into creating and publishing a fabulous YouTube video, “Call Me Maybe, Josh Davis.” It represented the inherent passion and joy that surfaces when young makers get together and intersect talents, skills, and interests in a collaborative venture.

Creativity Lab – Making in School. Fun fact: here at the Creativity Lab, Making isn’t just about making things.

Creativity Lab – Making in School

Making is also about learning to see the world with new eyes, and developing deeper knowledge and understanding of the world around us. One of the ways we incorporate this idea is through using Agency by Design’s thinking routines. Educators can easily integrate these routines into any subject — even those not typically associated with making, like the Humanities. The Maker Mindset » Stir-fried Science. Written by Dr Kiruthika Ramanathan, Senior Manager, Education Services & Outreach at Science Centre Singapore.

The Maker Mindset » Stir-fried Science

A key event of the Singapore Science Festival, Maker Faire Singapore, aims to inculcate the Maker mindset – a growth mindset that encourages people to believe that they can learn to do anything. As the founder of Maker Faire, Dale Dougherty, puts it, Makers reject the idea that you are defined by what you buy. Makers focus instead on what they can make and what they can learn to do. Makers are thus motivated by internal goals, and not external rewards. This is a very empowering thought, especially in today’s world where consumerism is rampant. Edutopia. Educator as Lead Learner: Learning LittleBits. I have discussed educators as model learners before: The educator’s role has or should change in this age of information abundance or Education 2.0-3.0.

Educator as Lead Learner: Learning LittleBits

The educator’s role has always been to model and demonstrate effective learning, but somewhere along the line, the major role of the educator became that of content and knowledge disseminator. Now that in this information age content is freely and abundantly available, it is more important than ever to assist learners in the process of how to learn. (Educator as Model Learner) Learning About Young Makers. I am a huge proponent of using hands-on, interactive learning activities to explore ill-defined problems as a way of teaching for all age groups.

Learning About Young Makers

Given the spontaneity and uncertainty of these types of active learning environments, I believe educators should observe, reflect on, and analyze how learners interact with the materials, the content, the educator, and the other learners. This practice is in line with the teacher as ethnographer. In my role as a teacher as ethnographer, I made some initial observations during my first two weeks of teaching maker education for elementary age students. With half the kids under 7, I learned a bunch about young makers. How the Maker Movement Is Transforming Education.

How the Maker Movement is Transforming Education By Sylvia Libow Martinez and Gary S.

How the Maker Movement Is Transforming Education

Stager The Maker Movement, a technological and creative learning revolution underway around the globe, has exciting and vast implications for the world of education. New tools and technology, such as 3D printing, robotics, microprocessors, wearable computing, e-textiles, “smart” materials, and programming languages are being invented at an unprecedented pace. The Educator as a Maker Educator: the eBook. I compiled all of my blog posts about Maker Education into an ebook that I published via Amazon Kindle.

The Educator as a Maker Educator: the eBook

The price is $3.99. It can be accessed at The pieces include theoretical ideas, informal research-observations, ideas related to the educator as a maker educator, the maker education process, suggestions for implementation, and reflecting on the making process. Graphics and infographics created to support the chapter content are included. YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. Connecting Makerspaces to Authentic Learning. I love the idea of making, inventing and tinkering. Just watch kids who are immersed in the activities and you can see the engagement. But is the learning authentic and relevant? I presented three sessions at the Free Maker Movement event at One Work Place on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 with some amazing educators who presented hands-on activities. The event will took place at our Oakland Center for Active Learning . I decided I needed to spend some time researching where the Maker Movement was happening and find examples of authentic learning.

Reflecting on the Making Process. My background is in experiential education. One of the strategies used in experiential education is debriefing or reflecting on the experience. In other words, learning from direct experience is not left to chance. The educator becomes proactive in debriefing or processing the experiences to increase the chances that learning occurs. This is in line with John Dewey’s ideas: ‘We do not learn from experience, we learn from reflecting on experience.’ A recent research study published via Harvard Business Review concluded that: Learning from direct experience can be more effective if coupled with reflection-that is, the intentional attempt to synthesize, abstract, and articulate the key lessons taught by experience.Reflecting on what has been learned makes experience more productive.Reflection builds one’s confidence in the ability to achieve a goal (i.e., self-efficacy), which in turn translates into higher rates of learning.

Reflecting on Becoming a Maker Educator. As I wrap up my work for CEP811, a course focused on the Maker Movement and adapting innovative technologies to education, I took time to reflect on all of the different projects I have worked on over the past seven weeks. I realized that each project was a piece of a larger #MakerEd puzzle. The thread of making runs through them all and by engaging in each one of them (e.g., remixing, playful exploration, creating lesson plans and assessments, etc), educators can begin to own and embody the mindsets associated with the Maker Movement. Stepping back to look at each project, I reorganized them in a cycle that I think could help educators begin to dip their toes into making and become more comfortable with it before integrating it into their teaching and later their classroom (design) and everyday practice.

Although I organized the cycle to be completed as an ongoing, step-by-step process, educators could jump in at any point. The Maker Educator Cycle (click to see links) Like this: Related. Project-Based Learning Through a Maker's Lens. MakerSpace Reflections #makered #ctedu. Maker Education - About Maker Education. Making MAKEing More Inclusive.

Bridge to the Future: Creating Maker Mindsets in Girls. Inspiring the Next Generation of Makers. 9 Maker Projects for Beginner Maker Ed Teachers. From Makerspace to Makerspaces: School-Wide Integration of a Maker Mindset. If you asked me to define a makerspace at the start of the school year, I would have told you it was a room - most likely in a high school - where a 3D printer was lorded over by the building’s resident tech guru. Perhaps there were a few robots in the corner and some wires or motors whose purpose I couldn’t identify.

What the definition wouldn’t have included was me. The one-room, one guru vision of a makerspace makes sense. The level of know-how to manage such a space, as well as the money required to fill it, would limit the scope of any school’s maker initiative. But what if you didn’t need expensive 3D printers, robots, and fancy gizmos? It took me a while to arrive at this expanded view of a makerspace. I began by moving my desk out of of the room, making way for a mini TV studio consisting of a tripod, camera, and dry erase board. My definition of “making” was going to be broad, spanning all subjects. That trust is paying off.