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Hessd 12 7843 2015. A25%20Love%20Rainfall interception evap runoff. 43032. An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. 10. The efficacy of calibrating hydrologic model using remotely sensed evapotranspiration and soil moisture for streamflow prediction. A Department of Infrastructure Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australiab CSIRO Land and Water, P.O.

The efficacy of calibrating hydrologic model using remotely sensed evapotranspiration and soil moisture for streamflow prediction

Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australiac Integrated Water and Land Management Program, ICARDA, P.O. Box 2416, Cairo, Egypt Received 7 September 2015, Revised 8 February 2016, Accepted 11 February 2016, Available online 22 February 2016 This manuscript was handled by Tim R. McVicar, Editor-in-Chief, with the assistance of Di Long, Associate Editor Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2016.02.018 Get rights and content Highlights Remotely sensed evapotranspiration (ET) and soil moisture (SM) are used for hydrologic model calibration.

Efficacy of each of calibration is assessed by the improvement in streamflow predictions. Calibration performs well in catchments with high average runoff. Summary Keywords Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. Calibration. 2007 Immerzeel FW69. RR140. Romaguera. Ganga Basin Science needs for water security. When dry is wet, what’s the problem? It seems obvious: if it’s called the Dry Zone it must be dry.

When dry is wet, what’s the problem?

Right? Webinar Asian Water Towers and Climate Change. Bookhagen trmm SWE in press. Publications - Meta Meta. India’s Climate Challenge. One of the positive outcomes of the recent UN climate summit in Paris, was the increased commitment by emerging economies to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

India’s Climate Challenge

Nowhere is this more vital than in India, where the demand for energy is escalating as the economy surges on. Farmer in a farm field. Photo: Neil Palmer / IWMI India’s poorest are likely to be among those most affected by a changing climate, so a new approach to mitigation makes sense. But change itself is now inescapable – indeed many would argue that more erratic weather patterns are already evident across the sub-continent. The Indus and Ganges-Brahmaputra Basins Are Drying Up Faster Than We’d Like. The Indus Basin is the second most overstressed on the planet, its water levels falling by 4-6 mm/year The Indus Basin at Skardu.

The Indus and Ganges-Brahmaputra Basins Are Drying Up Faster Than We’d Like

Photo: Adeel Shaikh (CC BY-NC 2.0) To the north, India is flanked by two giant groundwater aquifers – the Indus Basin to the west and the Ganges-Brahmaputra Basin to the east. Between them, they underlie a surface area of over 2.2 million sq. km and water from them supports the livelihoods of about 800 million people. That’s an area the size of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the population of the United States, Indonesia, Brazil and Malaysia combined. If a recent NASA survey is to be believed, the two basins which hold up two among the world’s largest agricultural regions including India’s breadbasket are, in fact, running dry. Annual groundwater level decline rates of the 37 largest aquifers. The data supporting these alarming conclusions was collected by the twin Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites between 2003 and 2013.

Southasia report. Satellite-derived surface and sub-surface water storage in the Ganges–Brahmaputra River Basin. Volume 4, Part A, September 2015, Pages 15–35 Groundwater Systems of the Indian Sub-Continent Edited By Abhijit Mukherjee, Dipankar Saha, Charles Harvey, Richard Taylor and Kazi Matin Ahmed Abstract Study region The Ganges–Brahmaputra (GB), a major river basin of the Indian Sub-Continent (ISC), is the host of more than 700 millions people.

Satellite-derived surface and sub-surface water storage in the Ganges–Brahmaputra River Basin

Study focus. Transboundaryriverbasins. RR83. Art8 2 2. Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security - Committee on Himalayan Glaciers, Hydrology, Climate Change, and Implications for Water Security, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Nati. Future water resources for food production in five South Asian river basins and potential for adaptation — A modeling study.

Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security. s13717 014 0019 4. TIBET: Environment and Development: Water availability and management. Growing industrialization, population growth, and increasing levels of consumption are placing heavy demands on water resources, which provide vital support for the subsistence livelihoods of millions of people.

TIBET: Environment and Development: Water availability and management

Figure 1 explains in brief the baseline water stress regions in Asia. The tension on water availability is further raised by the rate at which Chinese are commissioning damming projects on those trans-boundary rivers. With no foreseeable increase in the water availability and no water sharing treaty in action, all the riparian states from Pakistan till Vietnam are at the mercy of these massive reservoirs within Tibet and China. As for India, its water demand will double by 2030 reaching 1.5 trillion cubic meters, principally driven by population growth and the domestic need for agriculture [1]. TIWARI Prakash. How changes in rainfall and stream flows affect water security in the Indian Himalayan foothills. In Uttarakhand, as many as 450 new hydropower facilities are being developed rapidly and haphazardly.

How changes in rainfall and stream flows affect water security in the Indian Himalayan foothills

Installation of hydropower facilities presents a complex combination of benefits and risks for local residents. Hydropower facilities can provide local electricity, flood control and water storage for climate mitigation. However, there can be negative impacts. Road access to hydropower facilities as well as tunnel construction (dynamiting, rubble removal, etc.) is reported to increase landslides.