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IGD announces eight essential employability skills for the future - FE News. IGD, the research and training charity for the food and grocery industry, has identified eight essential employability skills that will help set students up for future success in the food and grocery industry.

IGD announces eight essential employability skills for the future - FE News

The eight essential skills were developed in consultation with 18 senior HR professionals from some of the largest companies in the industry and will play a significant role in IGD’s Feeding Britain’s Future workshops. The one to one interviews and feedback from IGD’s expert HR group were supported by a comprehensive literature review of existing work on skills from a wide range of organisations, in addition to IGD’s research into the supply chain skills gap, which included a quantitative survey of 150 supply chain professionals.

The eight essential employability skills identified are: Entrepreneurial: The food and grocery industry is teeming with start-up companies that are founded on drive and spirit to try something new and launch products to market. About IGD: Why top companies are ditching degree requirements for some jobs. Opinion By Joshua Krook, University of Adelaide Updated At the end of 2016, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) revealed close to two-thirds of all Australians had completed a degree or apprenticeship.

Why top companies are ditching degree requirements for some jobs

The growth in the number of people attending a university or TAFE has risen out of a cyclical demand-driven system called "academic inflation". Think supply and demand. If an employer can hire someone with a degree or someone without, they'll hire the person with a degree because they are seen as the superior candidate. This puts pressure on everyone to get degrees. Entering the job market? Think skills, not just careers. Posted If you're a young person about to enter the job market, the skills you have already may give you more job mobility than you think — as long as you're in the right "job cluster".

Entering the job market? Think skills, not just careers

That's one of the main takeaways from a new report from the Foundation for Young Australians (FYA). It found the skills you get from working in one job could on average be transferred to 13 other positions. The report suggests in the future young people should be focusing on their strengths and interest areas rather just the one dream job. Employability Skills: Skills You Need for a Job. For many people today, a career for life is no longer an option.

Employability Skills: Skills You Need for a Job

Most people will hold jobs with a variety of employers and move across different employment sectors through their working life. We all need to be flexible in our working patterns and be prepared to change jobs and/or sectors if we believe there are better opportunities elsewhere. In order to be flexible we need a set of 'transferable skills' – skills that are not specific to one particular career path but are generic across all employment sectors. Young jobseekers not getting 'enterprise' skills employers are looking for, analysis shows. Posted A large analysis of jobs data shows young Australians are not developing the enterprise skills employers are looking for.

Young jobseekers not getting 'enterprise' skills employers are looking for, analysis shows

Key Points: 4.2 million job ads analysedDemand for digital skills up 212 per centCritical thinking skills demand up 150 per centCall to teach enterprise skills in primary school The analysis commissioned by the Foundation for Young Australians looked at 4.2 million job advertisements from 2012 to 2015, to identify the skills most in demand in junior positions. Generation Success — Telstra CEO David Thodey always looks for ways to improve processes. ‘Don’t just accept the status quo’ ...

Generation Success — Telstra CEO David Thodey always looks for ways to improve processes

Telstra CEO David Thodey is backing the Generation Success initiative Source: News Limited LOADING suitcases onto buses going to Wellington airport as a 14-year-old schoolboy on Christmas holidays taught Telstra boss David Thodey never to accept the status quo and always look at ways of improving the process. This has stuck with him as he revolutionised the nation’s biggest telecommunications player and turned it into a major corporate player.

GENERATION SUCCESS: Woolworths, News Corp Australia’s jobless youth initiative The New Zealand-born executive admits a series of low-end boring jobs during school and university, including as a tractor driver on pea farm, taught him about responsibility and that hard work pays — even if it is just a few dollars it is better than none. “Even just the way you carry or stack the bags, I wanted to make things even more efficient. “Young people can’t just sit there and just wait for the perfect job to arrive. Generation Success summit told work experience needs an overhaul. Prime Minister Tony Abbott and senior business leaders back plan to boost youth employment.

Generation Success summit told work experience needs an overhaul

Based on The New York Times bestselling true story of heroism, courage and survival, Lone Survivor tells the incredible tale of four Navy SEALs on a covert mission. Properties of the weekend with Prue Miller. The federal government has released details of its new three-year $5.1 billion 'work for the dole' program. TODAY Show host Karl Stefanovic asks Tony Abbott if he got on the Sake's with Japanese PM Shinzo Abe last night. Young workers too picky with first job as Generation Success tackles youth unemployment. Generation Success ... an initiative by Woolworths and News Corp Australia and backed by other major businesses.

Young workers too picky with first job as Generation Success tackles youth unemployment

Source: Supplied GENERATION Y workers may be perfectly poised to excel in the workplaces of the 21st century but the inflated expectations of young workers means many are unwilling to take any role as their first job, a new survey has found. Youth unemployment is running at around 20 per cent in many suburbs but more than 70 per cent of older workers say gen Y’s refusal to accept lower paid and often boring roles as a starting point is part of the problem. Ahead of Wednesday’s Generation Success summit with Prime Minister Tony Abbott and major business leaders — a program that aims to shine a light on youth unemployment — A Galaxy poll found younger workers are taking up to 4 months to find their first job and move roles much quicker than older generations.

But KPMG demographer Bernard Salt is upbeat gen Y is perfectly placed for the changing workplace.