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English Grammar – Your guide to error-free writing

English Grammar – Your guide to error-free writing
Welcome to EnglishGrammar.org! Here you’ll learn all aspects of the English written language, enabling you to improve your writing skills in both personal and formal communications. Whether you’re starting with the very basics such as understanding the meaning of verbs and nouns and correct apostrophe placement, or wanting to understand more complex topics such as conjunctions, syntax optimization and creative writing techniques, we have it all covered. How to Get Started We’re constantly working to make this website more effective and efficient, and we’re committed to helping you find the information you need, fast. To get started, navigate over to the left-hand side of the page.

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Links for translators The resources on this page are all available free (or in free versions) on the Internet. General Dictionaries Cambridge The suite of Cambridge dictionaries are possibly the best online English-English dictionaries available (and with nearly 2m searches a month, among the most popular). Catalan Catalan dictionary from the Enciclopèdia Catalana. Dictionary.com Apart from the good results from its dictionary, the site also provides a lot of other resources (other language dictionaries, thesarus, style guides, links...). Merriam-Webster Not the full Merriam-Webster but useful nevertheless. 26 Fresh ESL Conversation Starters to Get Students Talking! 10 Oct I love teaching conversation in the ESL classroom. Part of it must be that because the students able to “converse” in English are better able to demonstrate their personalities, preferences, thoughts… and therefore, I get to know them better. Often it is simply hilarious to see the range of answers students feel free to share in a comfortable environment. If you’re a conversation teacher in an English as a Second Language classroom, there may be times when you feel as though you want fresh ideas, a change in routine or some way to remain slightly unpredictable so your students remain curious as to what tricks you have up your sleeves.

ESL Teaching Resources for English Language Teachers Select one of the five categories below to expand the list of ESL Teaching Resources. 75 Resources Lesson activities include games, puzzles, and warm-ups, as well as activities to teach and practice each of the core skills of language learning: speaking, listening, writing, reading, grammar, and vocabulary. These activities can be used as a component of a lesson, as homework for extra practice, or they can be developed into a complete lesson. 32 Resources Full lesson plans and templates for all levels of English skill: beginner, intermediate, and advanced, as well as lesson plans for mixed-level classes and plans that can be adapted for any level.

Grammar Welcome to EnglishClub Grammar for English learners. Many of these grammar lessons also have quizzes to check your understanding. If you still don't understand something, feel free to ask a question at the Grammar Help Desk. grammar (noun): the structure and system of a language, or of languages in general, usually considered to consist of syntax and morphology.

it's NOT about what the teacher does with technology Bruce Springsteen: "When we kiss…" Not just going through the motions! You could probably say I've had four different though overlapping careers — in language teaching, language teacher training, technology and ELT management. The first of those I retired from (after 35+ years) a few months ago, though the number of contact hours I was doing was limited; teacher training I'm retiring from at the end of this month; management I got fired from (to the relief of all involved!) many years ago; which leaves only another 10 or so years in technology to do (I'm only (?) 57, so it ain't over yet!).

Shopping – in a Café Shopping – in a Café Submitted by admin on 17 November, 2002 - 15:11 This lesson presents vocabulary relating to cafés. They also practise reading and ordering instructions and a short dialogue. They practise a short role-play. Timing: 60-90 mins English Grammar Pill: How to use the future tenses correctly Many of you will know that I am a huge fan of mind maps and infographics. I think they are a colourful and imaginative way of showing language points whether they are grammar or lexis. I haven’t had the time to create my own mind maps, however I have made good use of the excellent resources available from my creative fellow teachers to help me with my posts. And today is no exception.

English teachers, are you asking the right questions? Declan Cooley, CELTA Opens in a new tab or window. trainer at the British Council in Poland, explains why some questions are not as effective as they first appear, and offers some alternatives. Questions of all kinds are a teacher's most basic tools for generating interest, provoking thoughts, encouraging students to speak, developing text comprehension skills and checking understanding. New teachers on courses like the CELTA spend a lot of time honing their skills at using effective questions in the classroom. As well as discovering what questions work, teachers learn that some questions are not as effective as they first appear. Here are a few questions that do not always give the results intended. In some cases, we will see where they can be useful or how they can be replaced.

Activities for correcting writing in the language classroom How can teachers encourage learners to correct their own writing? Second-time winner of TeachingEnglish blog award, Cristina Cabal, offers a few tried and tested error-correction activities. Does every single writing error need to be corrected? In the learning of a second language, this is a question that stirs up great controversy. While it is true that most spelling errors will disappear as learner proficiency increases, there are some persistent errors – mainly grammatical – which remain despite repeated efforts to correct them.

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