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3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching

3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching
During the summer, you'll want to improve your teaching and lessons, but how do you decide where to start? Your students! I use these three ways to get feedback from my students on my lessons, activities, and what I can do to improve next year. Collecting Input First, I’m trying to identify my awful lessons or units so that I can rework them over the summer. For example, I set as a goal to take the most boring lesson or unit from one year and making it epic next year. Second, I want to understand firsthand what kids love and what they hate. 1. I end the year with students in a circle. I'm so proud of what you've done this year and how you've improved. First of all, what did we learn that you loved this year? What were the things we learned that you liked the least? So what is the most boring thing we did the whole year? Is there anything you wish we'd had more time to do? Was there anything you wish we'd done more of? How about ______? 2. 3. Just keep anonymous notes in perspective.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/student-feedback-improves-your-teaching-vicki-davis

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Improving Your Teaching: Obtaining Feedback Adapted from Black (2000) Center for Research on Learning and Teaching Just as students benefit in their learning from receiving your comments on their papers and assignments, you may find it beneficial in improving your teaching to receive feedback from your students. The more information that you gather about your teaching the more you can make informed changes that will be beneficial both to your students and to you as you develop as a teacher. There are several sources of information that you can use: student feedback, self evaluation, peer observation, viewing a videotape of your teaching, and consultation with a staff member at CRLT or with someone from your department. Student Feedback

Students most effectively learn math working on problems that they enjoy, not drills or exercises Students learn math best when they approach the subject as something they enjoy, according to a Stanford education expert. Speed pressure, timed testing and blind memorization pose high hurdles in the youthful pursuit of math. "There is a common and damaging misconception in mathematics – the idea that strong math students are fast math students," said Jo Boaler, a Stanford professor of mathematics education and the lead author on a new working paper. Boaler's co-authors are Cathy Williams, cofounder of Stanford's YouCubed, and Amanda Confer, a Stanford graduate student in education. Curriculum timely

Updated Comparison of Backchannel & Informal Assessment Tools Last winter I published a series of charts in which I compared popular ed tech tools for things like blogging, informal assessment, and video production. As is to be expected in the tech world, some of the tools in those charts have changed. Therefore, I'm now going through each chart and updating it. Yesterday, I published an update to my blogging platforms comparison chart. Today, I updated my chart comparing tools for backchannels and informal assessment.

Breaking the Teacher-Student Conflict Cycle: 5 Steps You Can Take Now Look to the grown-ups first! The key to improving student behavior is changing the way teachers and administrators react. This is the second in a three-part series on Building Positive School Culture, sponsored by Boys Town. To read the first article, click here. Devon enters your classroom with his head down and his stride slow. Student Centered Educators – globally minded counselor As an educator, every action taken, every decision made, every choice being weighed should be in a student’s best interest. By always keeping students at the center, an educator is most likely to create a purposeful, meaningful, and authentic learning environment that serves all students — not just a handful. Over the years, I have noticed a variety of practices that clearly indicate an educator is making decisions to promote student centered teaching and learning. Here are a few of my anecdotal observations of student centered practices: 1. Teacher is never behind a desk.

Gathering Feedback from Students The feedback students provide about your teaching on their end-of-semester course evaluations can be valuable in helping you improve and refine your teaching. Soliciting mid-semester student feedback has the additional benefit of allowing you to hear your students’ concerns while there is still time in the semester to make appropriate changes. In her book Tools for Teaching, Barbara Gross Davis offers a variety strategies for gathering feedback from students in a chapter called Fast Feedback. In-Class Feedback Forms Introduction

10 Free Math Games Your Kids Should Be Playing The mere mention of the word “mathematics” is enough to strike fear into the hearts of adults around the world. For thousands of people, the thought of doing annual tax returns, applying for a mortgage, or even just helping children with their homework can bring them out in an episode of cold sweats and get them running for the nearest calculator. Luckily their are phone apps to help adults improve, but the long-term solution appears reasonably obvious; children need to be engaged with maths from a young age, making use of tools, games, and apps that make the process of learning arithmetic fun rather than an arduous task. Here we look at some of the best games to help children learn mathematics in a fun way: Fraction Flags (Ages 7-9) Fractions can be a fiendishly difficult aspect of maths – they form a key part of basic algebra and underpin a surprising number of real-world situations.

Using Pre-Needs Assessment for Effective PD I've had the pleasure to deliver and be part of countless sessions and workshops, and I can tell you from first-hand experience that there is nothing worse than a presenter who doesn't know his or her audience. Adult learners carry with them a very diverse set of skills and needs. To prepare a one-size-fits-all (or most) session does everyone a disservice. How to Stop Yelling at Your Students Listen to this post as a podcast: Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 26:18 — 36.5MB) I’ll start right away by admitting I have done my fair share of yelling. As a middle school teacher, I wasn’t too bad—I probably had one good yell per week.

Students as innovators… – What Ed Said Guest post by Claire, one of our Grade 5 teachers, discovering the power of letting go. The headings are my commentary… Opportunities for creativity and innovation… Over the last week, my team of Year 5 teachers, together with Edna, have been planning a unit of inquiry into energy. We had already established the rubric for conceptual understandings that was to guide our inquiry but were looking for ways to allow for more creativity. Provocation to encourage thinking and action…

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