background preloader

50 Popular English Idioms to Sound Like a Native Speaker

50 Popular English Idioms to Sound Like a Native Speaker
To understand English as it is spoken in real life, you have to be familiar with idioms. They are used so much in everyday English that it is important to be aware of them. You need to learn what they mean, and how to use them to become an ‘insider’. This blog post will show you some of the most popular English idioms currently in use. Remember, knowledge is power. 50 Popular English Idioms 1. I’m not getting enough sleep these days. 2. My colleagues were surprised at the Christmas party- I let my freak flag fly and showed them a break dance routine. 3. The party got out of hand and the guests started to throw bottles at each other. 4. I just can’t get my head around the fact that Joe is leaving us. 5. My parents wanted me to give up writing, but I dug in my heels and went on to become a famous writer.My parents wanted me to give up writing, but I stuck to my guns and went on to become a famous writer. 6. 7. 8. I’ll leave no stone unturned until I find out who did this. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

http://www.myenglishteacher.eu/blog/50-popular-english-idioms-and-slang-words/

Related:  RESSOURCES LV1 ANGLAISanglais 2Vocabidioms

Tim's Free English Lesson Plans Image credit: teaching.berkeley.edu Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio I’m running the Barcelona Half-Marathon dressed as David Bowie to raise money for Cancer Research, sponsor me here: This is a vocabulary lesson originally designed for higher levels (C1+) but the method can be adapted for any level and any set of vocabulary. The idea is that students teach each other a set of phrasal verbs, analyse them and then put them into practice in a gap-fill and a discussion.

English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions Use the navigation above to browse our A-Z of English idioms … If you have a question about idioms, ask us about it in our Idioms Discussion Forum. If you know of an idiom that you would like to be listed here, please use our online form to suggest an idiom. Below are listed the latest 30 entries that have been added to our database of English idioms & idiomatic expressions. Subscribe to our idioms feed to keep up-to-date: Idioms Quick searches: An idiom is a group of words in current usage having a meaning that is not deducible from those of the individual words. For example, "to rain cats and dogs" - which means "to rain very heavily" - is an idiom; and "over the moon" - which means "extremely happy" - is another idiom. In both cases, you would have a hard time understanding the real meaning if you did not already know these idioms! There are two features that identify an idiom: firstly, we cannot deduce the meaning of the idiom from the individual words; and secondly, both the grammar and the vocabulary of the idiom are fixed, and if we change them we lose the meaning of the idiom.

English Skills: 7 ways of saying “I don’t know” In this second post dedicated to life skills in English, I’d like to focus on the different ways you can say “I don’t know” in English. As my clients will tell you, saying “I don’t know” to me is not an option in our lessons! I will not allow my clients to rely on me to give them the answers before they have tried themselves to seek the answers. 10 Illustrated English Idioms That Will Make Your Life Easier For many people learning English for the first time it can be daunting and complex language to master. Lots of silent letters, complex spellings and odd expressions which often go over the heads of most non-English speakers. To make learning English a little easier, Irish illustrator Roisin Hahessy has created some wonderfully simple yet funny pictures to help make things a little clearer. She's also a part-time English teacher in Brazil so she uses the series to aid her students as well. Now whenever you hear any of these English idioms, thanks to Hahessy at least now you'll have a better idea of where the conversation is heading!

Koprowski - Ten Good Games for Recycling Vocabulary The Internet TESL Journal Mark Koprowskimarkkoprowski [at] yahoo.com Introduction Learning is remembering. If we respect this axiom, the review and recycling of new language items will be critical if they stand a chance of becoming readily accessible in long-term memory. In fact, students do the majority of their forgetting shortly after the lesson and then the rate of forgetting diminishes. To avoid this lexical vanishing act, one solution offered is to follow the 'principle of expanding rehearsal'. 14 Expressions with Crazy Origins that You Would Never Have Guessed Guest post by Anais John You probably use tons of expressions, idioms, and slang phrases every day that don’t make literal sense. If you ever thought long and hard about why you say something a certain way, you could probably make a guess. However, some English expressions are so crazy and unusual that it is impossible to guess where on earth it originated from — unless you know the history.

Seven steps to vocabulary learning You might expect that, after having been exposed to a word in ten, twenty, or maybe at the very most thirty, contexts, a learner will gradually piece together the word's meaning and start to use it correctly, appropriately and fluently. Classroom context Seven steps to vocabulary learning Conclusion Classroom context Of course we cannot expect a learner to acquire difficult words in the same way as a young child acquires their first language, but, perhaps as teacher we can somehow help learners to arouse their 'learning monitor' by, for example, providing rich contexts containing the target language and by giving our learners time to reflect on what the language item means. In this way teachers can use the EFL classroom to replicate the real world and nurture strategies to help students understand and produce difficult language items which often seem beyond their grasp. Seven steps to vocabulary learning Here are some practical steps that I have used to help my students.

20 Misused Words That Make Smart People Look Dumb  We're all tempted to use words that we're not too familiar with. If this were the only problem, I wouldn't have much to write about. That's because we're cautious with words we're unsure of and, thus, they don't create much of an issue for us. Nine ways to revise English vocabulary using slips of paper What can teachers do when classroom technology stops working? Cristina Cabal, latest winner of the British Council's TeachingEnglish blog award for her post on pronunciation, suggests nine activities for revising English vocabulary using simple slips of paper. Nowadays, it seems very simple to plan a lesson that makes use of the many tools available online, especially as more and more of us have access to the Internet in our classrooms. But while technology is increasingly part of our teaching, there are times when it can cause problems and frustrations for teachers, such as when the Wi-Fi stops working or the computer shuts down, leaving you with a one-hour lesson to teach and no plan B up your sleeve.

UK slang for international students By Sophie Cannon at Education UK, 27 January 2014 'Hiya mate, fancy a cuppa and a chin-wag?' 'I can't sorry pal, I'm skint. Gutted!' When you first arrive in the UK for your studies, you might be mystified by some of the words and phrases local people use. ESL Worksheets, English Word Formation, Prefixes, Suffixes Teach Kids to Read with Phonics - Games, Videos, Worksheeets Word Formation Worksheets Prefixes and Suffixes- Affixes & Root Words to Guess Meaning A prefix is a letter or group of letters added to the beginning of a word to make a new word: In the word '”UNHAPPY”, 'UN-' is a prefix added to HAPPY.

Related: