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IdiomSite.com - Find out the meanings of common sayings

Having something that is certain is much better than taking a risk for more, because chances are you might lose everything. A Blessing In Disguise: Something good that isn't recognized at first. A Chip On Your Shoulder: Being upset for something that happened in the past. A Dime A Dozen: Anything that is common and easy to get. A Doubting Thomas: A skeptic who needs physical or personal evidence in order to believe something. A Drop in the Bucket: A very small part of something big or whole.

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The Seven Best Short Films for ELT Students - Kieran Donaghy I’ve been writing lesson plans designed around short films for my website Film English for six years. Teachers often ask me how I find the short films I use in my lesson plans. The answer is quite simple: I’ve watched literally thousands of short films and developed an instinct for the type of engaging and simple short films which will work in the ELT classroom. In this article I’d like to share what for me are the seven best short films for the language classroom. The Mirror The Mirror is a short film by Ramon and Pedro which tells the story of a boy’s journey from childhood to old age.

English Grammar Guide Punctuation is used to create sense, clarity and stress in sentences. You use punctuation marks to structure and organise your writing. You can quickly see why punctuation is important if you try and read this sentence which has no punctuation at all: perhaps you dont always need to use commas periods colons etc to make sentences clear when i am in a hurry tired cold lazy or angry i sometimes leave out punctuation marks grammar is stupid i can write without it and dont need it my uncle Harry once said he was not very clever and i never understood a word he wrote to me i think ill learn some punctuation not too much enough to write to Uncle Harry he needs some help Now let's see if punctuating it makes a difference!

Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms are commonly used in spoken and written English. They add colour and interest to what we are saying. But how often do we actually find idioms in their original and full form? 40 Excellent Short Stories For Middle School Middle school is a funny place. Students can be mature and insightful one minute, obtuse and petulant the next. Yet even the most resistant scholar will enjoy a good story. The 40 stories below are sometimes surprising, other times hair-raising. They are all guaranteed to raise questions and instigate discussions in your classroom that can lead to meaningful dialogues about what really matters in the lives of your students.

Winter Kids Poems Winter is Warmest Kids Poem – Classroom Jr. Use our special 'Click to Print' button to block the rest of the page and only send the image to your printer. 282 original ideas for Argumentative Speech Topics An argumentative speech is a persuasive speech in which the speaker attempts to persuade his audience to alter their viewpoints on a controversial issue. While a persuasive speech may be aimed more at sharing a viewpoint and asking the audience to consider it, an argumentative speech aims to radically change the opinions already held by the audience. This type of speech is extremely challenging; therefore, the speaker should be careful to choose a topic which he feels prepared to reinforce with a strong argument. Argumentative speeches generally concern topics which are currently being debated by society, current controversial issues. These topics are often derived from political debates and issues which are commonly seen in the media. The chosen topic may be political, religious, social, or ethical in nature.

Who, That, Which Rule 1. Who and sometimes that refer to people. That and which refer to groups or things. Examples: Anya is the one who rescued the bird. "The Man That Got Away" is a great song with a grammatical title. The World is Your Oyster In my last blog post, I wrote about some of the vocabulary that we associate with the season of autumn. Words like apples, leaves, pumpkin, nuts, squirrels, trees, orange, red, soup, casserole, golden, chestnuts, mist and plenty more. In this post, I’d like to share with you 10 idioms that I’ve found related to some of the words above. So let’s start with the word ‘autumn’ itself. 1.

Lord of the Flies Lists of Nobel Prizes and Laureates Lord of the Flies Play the Lord of the Flies Game About the game The aim of this game is to introduce some basic analytical aspects of the book and to challenge the reader's memory through play.

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