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Garr Reynolds/Presentations

Garr Reynolds/Presentations
1. Keep it Simple PowerPoint uses slides with a horizontal or “Landscape” orientation. The software was designed as a convenient way to display graphical information that would support the speaker and supplement the presentation. The slides themselves were never meant to be the “star of the show” (the star, of course, is your audience). People came to hear you and be moved or informed (or both) by you and your message. 2. Your presentation is for the benefit of the audience. We’ll talk more about this in the delivery section below, but as long as we are talking about text, please remember to never, ever turn your back on the audience and read text from the slide word for word. This slide is not unusual, but it is not a visual aid,it is more like an “eye chart.” Try to avoid text-heavy (and sleep inducing) slides like this one. Aim for something like this simple slide above. And this is even better… 3. Use object builds and slide transitions judiciously. 4. 5. 6. Pie Charts. Line Charts. 7. 8.

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Presentation Skills 3. The Rule of Three This is one of the oldest of all the presentation techniques – known about since the time of Aristotle. People tend to remember lists of three things. Structure your presentation around threes and it will become more memorable. The Rule of Three – We remember three things. The rule of three is one of the oldest in the book – Aristotle wrote about it in his book Rhetoric. Put simply it is that people tend to easily remember three things.

Garr Reynolds Official Site 1. Show your passion If I had only one tip to give, it would be to be passionate about your topic and let that enthusiasm come out. Yes, you need great content. Organization & Preparation Tips Before you even open up PowerPoint, sit down and really think about the day of your presentation. What is the real purpose of your talk? Why is it that you were asked to speak? What does the audience expect? In your opinion, what are the most important parts of your topic for the audience to take away from your, say, 50-minute presentation? Remember, even if you’ve been asked to share information, rarely is the mere transfer of information a satisfactory objective from the point of view of the audience.

Structure Your Presentation Like a Story - Nancy Duarte by Nancy Duarte | 8:00 AM October 31, 2012 After studying hundreds of speeches, I’ve found that the most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved. That tension helps them persuade the audience to adopt a new mindset or behave differently — to move from what is to what could be. And by following Aristotle’s three-part story structure (beginning, middle, end), they create a message that’s easy to digest, remember, and retell. Here’s how it looks when you chart it out: And here’s how to do it in your own presentations.

Presentation skills and why you need them It's hard to imagine your career going anywhere unless you can deliver an effective presentation. Unfortunately, most technology industry folks seem to be missing the presentation gene. How can I generalize like that? Because, I've been watching them struggle for a quarter of a century. Why they're so deficient in this regard, I have no idea. But they stand there, like they're glued to the floor, with their 90-slide presentation with a dozen bullets and sub-bullets and a book of text on each slide.

Do Your Slides Pass the Glance Test? An audience can’t listen to your presentation and read detailed, text-heavy slides at the same time (not without missing key parts of your message, anyway). So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds. Think of your slides as billboards. Find images on Google that you can reuse - Search Help When you do a Google Search, you can filter your results to find images, videos, or text that you have permission to use. To do this, you’ll use an Advanced Search filter called “usage rights” that lets you know when you can use, share, or modify something you find online. Find images, text, and videos you can reuse Go to Advanced Image Search for images or Advanced Search for anything else. In the "all these words" box, type what you want to search.

Do Your Slides Pass the Glance Test? - Nancy Duarte by Nancy Duarte | 11:00 AM October 22, 2012 An audience can’t listen to your presentation and read detailed, text-heavy slides at the same time (not without missing key parts of your message, anyway). So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds. Think of your slides as billboards. Structure Your Presentation Like a Story After studying hundreds of speeches, I’ve found that the most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved. That tension helps them persuade the audience to adopt a new mindset or behave differently — to move from what is to what could be. And by following Aristotle’s three-part story structure (beginning, middle, end), they create a message that’s easy to digest, remember, and retell. Here’s how it looks when you chart it out:

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