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The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have

The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have
By EdTech Team Updated on march 2, 2015 : The original list that was created in 2011 comprised 33 skills , after reviewing it we decided to do some merging and finally ended up with the 20 skills below. The 21st century teacher should be able to : 1- Create and edit digital audio Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill :Free Audio Tools for Teachers 2- Use Social bookmarking to share resources with and between learners Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill : A List of Best Bookmarking Websites for Teachers 3- Use blogs and wikis to create online platforms for students Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill : Great Tools to Create Protected Blogs and Webpages for your Class 4- Exploit digital images for classroom use Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill :Web Tools to Edit Pictures without Installing any softwareTools to Convert Photos into Cartoons

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/33-digital-skills-every-21st-century.html

Related:  21st century teaching and learningClassrooms and pedagogyDigital competence21stCenturySkillsDocencia

Report highlights 10 trends set to shake up education Massive open social learning and dynamic assessment on the Open University’s list The Open University has published the Innovating Pedagogy 2014 report, which explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment. It proposes 10 innovations that, although already established to some extent, have not yet had what it describes as “a profound influence” on education. To produce the report, academics at the university’s Institute of Educational Technology proposed a long list of new educational terms, theories and practices, which were then boiled down to 10 that it deems to “have the potential to provoke major shifts in educational practice”. 1.

Casllwchwr:Week 2 Well, we are into Week 2 and I have to say that the opportunities the individual iPads have allowed for my whole class have been endless. I have begun training my digital leaders for my new class. (In my own mind, they are all digital leaders as they teach me things daily: being natural investigators. This is what a 21st Century teacher needs to accept. We are going to learn WITH the children – and they WILL lead the learning- which is how it should be.) Homework went out on Monday and I chose 4 children.

Digital skills teaching in schools needs radical rethink, says report The teaching of digital skills in schools should be regarded as equally important as lessons in numeracy and literacy, according to a report published on Tuesday. The study by the House of Lords digital skills committee calls for a radical rethink of education and says digital literacy should be treated as a third core subject. It also says the internet should be regarded as a utility on a par with water or electricity, in order to ensure unimpeded access for all. The report says urgent action is required to support teachers who are currently not equipped to deliver the new computing curriculum, and insists no child should leave school without basic digital literacy. An estimated 9.5 million people currently lack a minimum level of digital skills and the report warns the UK risks becoming “a branch economy, much less prosperous and influential” if it doesn’t pursue a digital agenda.

Web literacy: Where the Common Core meets common sense We believe it’s essential for every teacher to develop lessons that challenge students to learn how to verify sources; here’s one example By Alan November and Brian Mull Read more by Contributor May 25th, 2012 “To ensure that students learn the grammar and strategies of the web, we believe it’s essential for every teacher to develop lessons that challenge students to learn how to verify sources,” the authors write. 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching - 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching by TeachThought Staff What makes an effective teacher? Or more specifically, what observable characteristics might you see and hear? The University of Minnesota offered some observable characteristics of effective teaching which, while focused on teacher actions rather than student learning, had some useful tips–not so much how to teach generally, but specific actions that you can use tomorrow. In “How A Good Teacher Becomes Great,” we theorized that good teachers “know which assessments are for “show,” and which are for “go”—that is, which look good from 10 feet, and which provide visibility for both the student and teacher where the learning needs to go next,” and that they model curiosity, collaborate with other great teachers, and “measure understanding in diverse ways.”

Visitors and Residents: What Motivates Engagement with the Digital Information Environment? Building on research of individuals’ modes of engagement with the web (Visitors and Residents4), and the JISC-funded Digital Information Seeker report5, this project is exploring what motivates different types of engagement with the digital environment for learning. The investigation focuses on the sources learners turn to in order to gather information, and which ‘spaces’ (on and offline) they choose to interact in as part of the learning process. It is using the Visitors and Residents6 framework to map learner’s modes of engagement in both personal and institutional contexts.

iPads in the classroom: embedding technology in the primary curriculum Last year David Andrews wrote for us about how he was using one-to-one devices in the classroom in the hugely popular blog post: An Apple for the teacher: are iPads the future in class? Here, he updates us on his progress and shares some of his favourite technology-led learning ideas. Since the start of September 2012 myself and a colleague, Chris Williams, have been trying to maximise the use of handheld technology (iPads and iPods) in year 6 in all areas of the curriculum. The potential for enhancing teaching and learning through technology has been particularly interesting: we've developed a range of apps using both iPads and iPods to engage, motivate and inspire pupils' learning in the classroom. The school's 'Apple journey' began in June 2012. Once the year 6 SATs were finished, we gave both our year 6 classes a two-week project to build a controllable vehicle.

INFOGRAPHIC: Digital skills in Europe – EurActiv.com SPECIAL REPORT / Most jobs today require some digital and ICT skills. Jobseekers will have a harder time finding work without them. The European Commission tracks several indicators to measure the level of ICT skills in the population, such as: Basic digital skillsInternet users with advanced digital skillsIndividuals who have obtained ICT skills through formal educational institutionsPeople who have created a web pagePeople having written a computer programme Basic digital skills

Why more schools aren’t teaching web literacy—and how they can start Fourteen years after we first published ‘Teaching Zack to Think,’ here’s a new three-part framework for making sure students are internet savvy By Alan November and Brian MullRead more by Contributor May 8th, 2012 If you follow the dictate that we teach what we test, it’s understandable why schools haven’t spent more time preparing students to be web literate since NCLB was passed. In 1998, a 15-year-old high school student used the personal website of a professor at Northwestern University, Arthur Butz, as justification for writing a history paper called “The Historic Myth of Concentration Camps.” That student, who we will call Zack, had been encouraged to use the internet for research, but he had not been taught to decode the meaning of the characters in a web address.

10 Reasons Every Teacher Needs A Professional Learning Network - 10 Reasons Every Teacher Needs A Professional Learning Network by TeachThought Staff What’s a professional learning network? Why disruptive innovation matters to education There is a common tendency at this time of year to reflect and refocus on what matters most and then use that renewed focus to chart into the year ahead. In that spirit of reflection, I want to share some thoughts on why the theory of disruptive innovation, which guides our work here at the Clayton Christensen Institute, is so important to education. If you are not familiar with the theory of disruptive innovation, a brief explanation is available here on our website. For a more thorough explanation, The Innovator’s Solution lays out the theory in a comprehensive yet digestible format. My purpose here is not to explain the theory, but rather, explain in brief why that theory should matter to people who want to improve our education system. First, disruptive innovation is the catalyst for bringing about more equitable access to high-quality education.

How Much Are iPads Really Helping Kids in the Classroom? The drive to increase technology use in classrooms has many asking whether the investment is more fizzle than bang, and whether it’s too early to tell how wisely the money is being spent. Education author Peg Tyre has investigated the use of iPads, one of the most popular classroom additions, in TakePart. She concludes that iPads in education may offer some new teaching techniques, but by themselves, they may not be better than traditional, cheaper methods. The classroom used to be about chalkboards, textbooks, teachers speaking directly to groups of kids, and worksheets. The iPad can take any of these roles: but in which role is it most effective? Jornada Organizaciones Educativas Digitalmente Competentes - #DigCompOrg Upload EducaLAB Educalab educación Loading... Working... ► Play all

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