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Scottjehl/Respond: A fast & lightweight polyfill for min/max-width CSS3 Media Queries (for IE 6-8, and more)

Scottjehl/Respond: A fast & lightweight polyfill for min/max-width CSS3 Media Queries (for IE 6-8, and more)
README.md Respond.js A fast & lightweight polyfill for min/max-width CSS3 Media Queries (for IE 6-8, and more) Copyright 2011: Scott Jehl, scottjehl.comLicensed under the MIT license. The goal of this script is to provide a fast and lightweight (3kb minified / 1kb gzipped) script to enable responsive web designs in browsers that don't support CSS3 Media Queries - in particular, Internet Explorer 8 and under. It's written in such a way that it will probably patch support for other non-supporting browsers as well (more information on that soon).

https://github.com/scottjehl/Respond

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generatedata.com This data type randomly generates human names (mostly Western) according to the format you specify. You can specify multiple formats by separating them with the pipe (|) character. The following strings will be converted to their random name equivalent: This data type randomly generates names. It works in the same way as the Names data type, except that it creates slightly more realistic data sets since the names are mapped to the country; e.g.

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CSS3 Transform to Matrix Filter converter This is the hardest of all the transform functions to understand unless you are mathematically gifted. However, for those who are stubborn, geeky, or both, a brief explanation follows. If you don't undertand everything below, don't fret — you'll probably never use this function. This function is almost the direct equivalent to Microsoft's Matrix Filter. Responsive Layouts, Responsively Wireframed Responsive layouts, responsively wireframed Made with HTML/CSS (no images, no JS*) this is a simple interactive experiment with responsive design techniques. Use the buttons top-right to toggle between desktop and mobile layouts. Using simple layout wireframes, this illustrates how a series of pages could work across these different devices, by simulating how the layout of each page would change responsively, to suit the context.

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