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How to Learn

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Quora. Big Think Video - Learn about the 10 most popular learning... Learning How to Learn: Powerful mental tools to help you master tough subjects. Untitled. To master any skill, use the learning technique that scared Bruce Lee — Quartz. Constant interruptions are the bane of life in today’s open-plan offices.

To master any skill, use the learning technique that scared Bruce Lee — Quartz

And a Swedish-Swiss industrial engineering company, ABB, says it has a solution: It has given some of its employees a kind of automated “do not disturb” sign: custom-designed traffic lights for their desks. The FlowLight system evaluates how busy someone is by measuring their combined mouse and keyboard activity against that person’s baseline average. When activity is in the top 9% of their typical range, the light turns red, letting colleagues know that it’s the wrong time to amble over with a funny anecdote or any question that’s not absolutely burning.

Why am I so bad at math? You're not, you're just looking at it wrong. — Quartz. What does mathematics look like to you?

Why am I so bad at math? You're not, you're just looking at it wrong. — Quartz

Do you see a wondrous landscape filled with connected ideas, or a sprawling mess of symbols? The distinction matters a great deal, because your mathematical worldview is inextricably tied to your success in the subject. We are all familiar with the multiplication grid, a centerpiece of classrooms and home studies the world over: You cannot fault this image for accuracy. A Stanford researcher's 15-minute study hack improves test grades by a third of a grade — Quartz.

Policy makers, tech executives, teachers, and parents are forever trying to find new ways to improve kids’ performance at school.

A Stanford researcher's 15-minute study hack improves test grades by a third of a grade — Quartz

Schools design and redesign curricula, teachers embrace and reject new learning technologies, and parents plot ways to get their kids to study more. One novel solution researchers find helps kids to perform better is to get them to think about how they think—metacognition—and have them strategize how they study. If this sounds easy, it is not. How Elon Musk learns faster and better than everyone else — Quartz. This past weekend Donald Trump praised his Chinese counterpart for his efforts to address the increasingly tense situation on the Korean peninsula.

How Elon Musk learns faster and better than everyone else — Quartz

The US president said Xi Jinping “is working to try and resolve a very big problem, for China also.” That problem, of course, is the ongoing development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons by North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, despite UN sanctions. Kim seems hellbent on being able to hit North America with nuclear-tipped missiles, and some analysts think he’s only a few years away from it. Trump suggested he might be willing to meet Kim under the right conditions, echoing sentiments from secretary of state Rex Tillerson that the US is open to direct talks with North Korea as long as the agenda is a “denuclearized Korean peninsula.” The Secret to Learning Anything: Albert Einstein’s Advice to His Son. With Father’s Day around the corner, here comes a fine addition to history’s greatest letters of fatherly advice from none other than Albert Einstein — brilliant physicist, proponent of peace, debater of science and spirituality, champion of kindness — who was no stranger to dispensing epistolary empowerment to young minds.

The Secret to Learning Anything: Albert Einstein’s Advice to His Son

In 1915, aged thirty-six, Einstein was living in wartorn Berlin, while his estranged wife, Mileva, and their two sons, Hans Albert Einstein and Eduard “Tete” Einstein, lived in comparatively safe Vienna. My dear Albert, Yesterday I received your dear letter and was very happy with it. I was already afraid you wouldn’t write to me at all any more. You told me when I was in Zurich, that it is awkward for you when I come to Zurich. I taught my 5th-graders how to spot fake news. Now they won’t stop fact-checking me. #TEDEdChat: New experiments in self-teaching. TED-Ed - How to practice effectively ... for just about... The Lesson You Never Got Taught in School: How to Learn! A paper published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest evaluated ten techniques for improving learning, ranging from mnemonics to highlighting and came to some surprising conclusions.

The Lesson You Never Got Taught in School: How to Learn!

The report is quite a heavy document so I’ve summarised the techniques below based on the conclusions of the report regarding effectiveness of each technique. Be aware that everyone thinks they have their own style of learning (they don't, according to the latest research), and the evidence suggests that just because a technique works or does not work for other people does not necessarily mean it will or won’t work well for you. If you want to know how to revise or learn most effectively you will still want to experiment on yourself a little with each technique before writing any of them off. Elaborative Interrogation (Rating = moderate) A method involving creating explanations for why stated facts are true.

Is it okay to spend money on books instead of getting them from the library? — Quartz. Constant interruptions are the bane of life in today’s open-plan offices.

Is it okay to spend money on books instead of getting them from the library? — Quartz

And a Swedish-Swiss industrial engineering company, ABB, says it has a solution: It has given some of its employees a kind of automated “do not disturb” sign: custom-designed traffic lights for their desks. The FlowLight system evaluates how busy someone is by measuring their combined mouse and keyboard activity against that person’s baseline average. When activity is in the top 9% of their typical range, the light turns red, letting colleagues know that it’s the wrong time to amble over with a funny anecdote or any question that’s not absolutely burning.

Non-emergencies can wait until the light is green. How to read 200 books a year — Quartz. 4.

How to read 200 books a year — Quartz

Execute We all know reading is important. We all know we should do more of it. Untitled. Power Searching. Mental Models List – Medium. 8 Programs to Help You Learn - Medium. 8.

8 Programs to Help You Learn - Medium

Curious Grow your skills with 15,000 lessons in tech, business, and more. Curious starts with a questionnaire that measures your interest in eight different areas: work, play, mind/body, relationships, humanities, STEM, aesthetic, and music. All of these areas and their subsets combine to give you access to over 15,000 bite-sized lessons. Free websites and apps to learn something new - Medium. This article was originally published in my private newsletter. Once upon a time, if you wanted to learn something, you had to a) pay a bunch of money, and b) go to a school or classroom, a place specifically dedicated to learning. Those days are over.