background preloader

Loss, grief and healing

Facebook Twitter

End-of-life care - Adults. The healing power of grief. The German Hospice and Palliative Care Association opposes a move to add the diagnosis of ‘prolonged grief disorder’ to a new version of the International Classification of Diseases.

The healing power of grief

Dr Klaus Onnasch, a retired pastor and a grief counsellor, and a member of the Bereavement Section of the German Hospice and Palliative Care Association (DHPV), explains more. Dr Klaus Onnasch As a long-time counsellor to several grief support groups in Kiel (Germany), I was under the impression that grieving people are increasingly respected for the situation they find themselves in: they are allowed space and time to express exactly how they are feeling. I was pleased to see that a culture of grieving is growing, both in Germany and in other countries. But just how difficult and uncertain their situation continues to be became clear to me in a group of grieving parents.

Not long after I lost my child, people still accepted my grieving. However, extremely stressful situations exist that require therapy. Older people, palliative care and multiple perspectives: My contributions and future directions. An interview with Dr Maria Heckel PhD, winner of the 2019 EAPC Palliative Medicine Early Researcher Award. Highlights of every EAPC Congress are the EAPC Researcher Awards, which recognise and support the work of scientists and clinicians who make an outstanding contribution to palliative care research.

Older people, palliative care and multiple perspectives: My contributions and future directions. An interview with Dr Maria Heckel PhD, winner of the 2019 EAPC Palliative Medicine Early Researcher Award

We talk to Dr Maria Heckel, PhD, winner of the 2019 EAPC Palliative Medicine Early Researcher Award, about her work as Head of the Research Team at the Department of Palliative Medicine at the University Hospital Erlangen, Germany, and the research that has led to her award. Maria received her award on Friday 24 May in Berlin. Dr Maria Heckel delivers her plenary lecture. What, or who, was your inspiration for a career in palliative care? Dr Maria Heckel: I have always been interested in transitions in life and in the needs of people that are usually not visible in our society. Can you tell us briefly about the research that has led to your winning this award and some of the main findings? MH: At least in Germany, social work studies do not necessarily lead to a scientific career. Links Like this: The Strangeness of Grief. This period of disturbance took me through to the end of my time at Oxford.

The Strangeness of Grief

I had now to leave, go into the unknown, and somehow seek to get started as a writer. The many anxieties I lived with helped to push grief away. I felt I had been inoculated against grief. I had drunk that bitterness to the dregs, and since human beings have limited capacity I didn’t think I would be able to do so again. The months and years passed. It was a poor way of thinking. This grief has its own exigencies.

One morning, thirty years after the death of my father, my telephone rang. Providing emotional support to people at the end of life and their families. Photo: stokkete/Adobe Stock This article looks at the social worker’s role in the emotional and spiritual care of people who are dying.

Providing emotional support to people at the end of life and their families

It is taken from a Community Care Inform Adults guide on end of life care. The full guide is available to Inform Adults’ subscribers and covers guidance in unexpected end of life care situations, policy, planning, social work interventions and more. The guide is written by Malcolm Payne, a writer, editor and consultant in social work, social care management and end of life care.

Big Fat Negative. The Compassionate Friends. Home - Coroners Courts Support Service. Care and support through terminal illness. Blue Cross Pet Bereavement Support Service. RoadPeace – The National Charity for Road Crash Victims. ARC supports parents throughout antenatal testing and its consequences. Stillbirth and neonatal death charity. Sudden – Supporting people after sudden death. Support - Brake the road safety charity. Brake’s National Road Victim Service is a specialist service for people affected by road death and serious injury and the professionals supporting them.

support - Brake the road safety charity

Case management service providing emotional and practical support to people affected by road crashesPolice engagement working in partnership with all UK police force areasInformation and guidance including our nationally accredited bereavement packs and online resourcesTraining events for professionals Support during the COVID-19 pandemic If you have been bereaved by a road crash during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic, or if you are are caring for someone who has been bereaved in this way, Brake's National Road Victim Service is here to help.

Our case management service for road crash victims is open as usual, from 10am to 4pm, Monday to Friday, to give practical and emotional support to anyone affected by road death and serious injury. Being bereaved during this pandemic will be challenging. Your memories. AfterTrauma. Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide – Overcoming the isolation of people bereaved by suicide. Winston's Wish - giving hope to grieving children. Hope Again. WAY Widowed & Young - Bereavement support UK. Bereavement support after the death of a baby or child - The Lullaby Trust. Someone to talk to when you need it most – Bristol based charity. Dying Matters. Support after murder and manslaughter.